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BBC Space – Explore the planets, black holes, stars and more

BBC Space – Explore the planets, black holes, stars and more
<div id="orb-no-js-banner" class="orb-banner-wrapper"><p class="b-g-p b-g-m">For a better experience on your device, try our <a href=" site</a>.</p></div> Space Missions to Mars Explore mankind's voyages to the Red Planet. News: Stranded probe sends further signalsViking tests for Martian lifeMariner reveals MarsPathfinder: pioneering wheeled roverMariner 9 finds new features Universe Explore black holes, dark matter, stars, and many other astronomy topics. Autumn night sky Find out what you can see in the autumn night sky. The Sky at Night Find out more about everyone's favourite astronomy programme. Solar System Discover the planets, moons and other amazing sights in the Solar System. The space shuttle Look back on the world's first reusable spacecraft. Stargazing LIVE star guide Download your free guide to the stars and get the most out of the night sky. BBC iPlayer TV Radio More Science and Nature programmes on BBC iPlayer Elsewhere on the web

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125 Great Science Videos: From Astronomy to Physics & Psychology Astronomy & Space Travel A Brief, Wondrous Tour of Earth (From Outer Space) - Video - Recorded from August to October, 2011 at the International Space Station, this HD footage offers a brilliant tour of our planet and stunning views of the aurora borealis.A Universe from Nothing - Video - In 53 minutes, theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss answers some big enchilada questions, including how the universe came from nothing.A Year of the Moon in 2.5 Minutes - Video - The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been orbiting the moon for over a year. The footage gets compressed into 2 slick minutes.A Day on Earth (as Seen From Space) - Video - Astronaut Don Pettit trained his camera on planet Earth, took a photo once every 15 seconds, and then created a brilliant time-lapse film.Atlantis's Final Landing at Kennedy Space Center - Video - After more than 30 years, the space shuttle era comes to a close. Video runs 30 minutes.

A 6,000 year old telescope without a lens - prehistoric tombs enhanced astron... Astronomers are exploring what might be described as the first astronomical observing tool, potentially used by prehistoric humans 6,000 years ago. They suggest that the long, narrow entrance passages to ancient stone, or 'megalithic', tombs may have enhanced what early human cultures could see in the night sky, an effect that could have been interpreted as the ancestors granting special power to the initiated. The team present their study at the National Astronomy Meeting, being held this week in Nottingham. The team's idea is to investigate how a simple aperture, for example an opening or doorway, affects the observation of slightly fainter stars. They focus this study on passage graves, which are a type of megalithic tomb composed of a chamber of large interlocking stones and a long narrow entrance. These structures could therefore have been the first astronomical tools to support the watching of the skies, millennia before telescopes were invented.

Using Layers in Photoshop – a Comprehensive Beginners’ Tutorial Like Every image in Photoshop is made of layers, and the manner in which these layers are designed and then stacked together is what gives the image its appearance and appeal. As such, using layers in Photoshop should be common knowledge for every Photoshop users. Here is a brief but comprehensive Photoshop beginner tutorial on how to use layer in Photoshop. The layers panel in Photoshop not only gives you access to the layers, but it also comes with a wide range of features that make manipulating and designing these layers simple. Station Spacewalk Game <center><div class="site_errors"><div class="floatType_site_error_top"></div><div class="floatType_site_error"><table summary="layout table"><tr><td bgcolor="#000000"><font color="#ffffff"><h2><img src="/templateimages/redesign/modules/overlay/site_error.gif" title="Site Error" alt="Site Error"/>There's a problem with your browser or settings. </h2></font><font color="#ffffff"><p>Your browser or your browser's settings are not supported. To get the best experience possible, please download a compatible browser. If you know your browser is up to date, you should check to ensure that javascript is enabled.

Top 10 Best Astrophotographers in the World The sky that we usually see and is considered to be an ordinary thing is in fact full of many wonders and secrets that need to be revealed but how to do this? Discovering more about the secrets that are hidden in the sky is costly and requires spending a long time trying to see the invisible objects and observe the changes that take place in front of your eyes using special equipment. The question is how to record all what you see and the amazing beauty of the invisible objects that can be found in the sky to enjoy watching them whenever you want? It is the role of the astrophotographers who come to dazzle us with the photos that they capture and are considered by many people to be unbelievable because of the stunning beauty that can be found in them.

Some Satellite Photos of Earth at Night (After clicking on a photo-link to show a photo, click on the Back button of your browser to return to this page. Alternatively: In most browsers, you can click the right mouse button when the cursor is over a link, then choose to open the link in a separate window.) Table of Contents: (of this page) For more images, you can use an Image search engine, like Google Images, and use keywords like "lights night satellite". End of Table of Contents. Start of contents. An Introduction to Photoshop Compositing for Beginners - Digital Photography School by Sarah Hipwell What is compositing? Simply, it means to combine two or more images to make a single picture. As a photographer, I’m constantly coming up with different concepts that I feel might make a good photo.

The Earth and Beyond Welcome to The Earth and Beyond Hello, my name is Tim O'Brien. I'm an astronomer working at The University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory. As an astronomer my job is to try and understand how the universe works and my main interest is why some stars explode - more about this later! I also get to visit lots of schools and share amazing facts with children and teachers about the Sun, Earth and Moon, the stars and planets, and the Universe as we know it! Now, in the Children’s University, I can share the excitement with you.

Earth & Space Science Essential Science for Teachers Exploring topics that range from soil to the solar system, Essential Science for Teachers: Earth and Space Science provides participants the opportunity to increase their science content knowledge and develop new understandings of how this content connects to K - 6 classrooms. The Geologic Timeline "Which came first, the chicken or the egg?" The Drake Equation "What do we need to know about to discover life in space?" How can we estimate the number of technological civilizations that might exist among the stars? While working as a radio astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia, Dr.

Introduction to the Photoshop Toolbar (Part 1) In this article (Part 1 of 3) I will give you a quick introduction to the Photoshop CS5 toolbar. The toolbar is a floating panel normally placed at the left of the screen. View Other Articles in This Series Resources start chapter 0: Introductory Materials[+] 1: Introductory Physics: A Model Approach, Online Edition 2: Copyright and License Vostochny (formerly Svobodny) Cosmodrome One of the many problems the Russian government faced upon the collapse of the Soviet Union was access to space launch facilities. Baikonur Cosmodrome, the largest Soviet space center, was in the newly-independent Kazakhstan. During 1991-1993, negotiations over the status of the facility were not easy. Russia turned to Plesetsk, as its "heartland" space center, however its geographical location limited payloads and the range of orbits accessible from the site. Besides, Plesetsk has never had launch pads for the heavy Proton launcher, the backbone of Russian space commerce.

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