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Kidsmart: Welcome

Kidsmart: Welcome

http://www.kidsmart.org.uk/

Related:  Digital CitizenshipOnline Safety ResourcesInternet and SafetyNew Training Project

Digital Citizenship Week: 6 Resources for Educators Considering how ubiquitous smartphones and tablets have become, especially in high school and middle school, questions about managing use and educating students about digital etiquette are on a lot of educators' minds. This October, Common Sense Media is sponsoring Digital Citizenship Week from October 16 to October 22. And we wanted to pull together some of the best resources to help educators talk about digital responsibility and safety online.

Teach Online Safety Key concepts for students to understand and apply to their online experience. C-SAVE is our volunteer program to teach young people cybersecurity, cybersafety, and cyberethics. It's easy to participate and use! When you start college, you're taking on new responsibilities, making your own decisions, and becoming part of the campus community. There is an important role that you can play in your college's cybersecurity efforts that combines these elements of responsibility, decision-making, and community.

Online Safety Listen Cyberbullying It's not just strangers who can make you feel uncomfortable. Cyberbullying refers to cruel or bullying messages sent to you online. Police Service of Northern Ireland The internet provides a useful educational tool for both parents and children alike. Most homes have an internet connection and research shows that children are the main users. Did you know that 1 in 12 children actually go to meet people they have only met online?

Keeping Kids Safe Online If your child is surfing the Web, you need to be paddling right alongside him — or at least observing him carefully from the shore. While the Internet offers goodies galore (educational materials, fun games, and connections with people all over the world), it can also pose risks to your child's physical safety and emotional well-being. Here's what is appealing — and what's dangerous — about several popular ways kids use the Internet, along with suggested rules to keeping kids safe online. The bottom line: Communicate with your child. Discuss what she's doing online and why. Set rules, and talk about them. Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens We hope that students and educators gain useful skills and a holistic understanding about responsible digital citizenship, not only on YouTube, but in all online activity.

Privacy Pirates: An Interactive Unit on Online Privacy (Ages 7-9) This tutorial introduces children, ages 7-9, to the concept of online privacy and teaches them to distinguish between information that is appropriate to give out and information better kept private – and to recognize how this may change in different contexts. In the game children assemble a map leading to a pirate treasure (to introduce the idea that personal information has value). As they do this, they will be asked a variety of questions about privacy and personal information on the Internet.

Online Citizenship Explained by Common Craft Most people are good citizens in the offline world. They are kind to others, they obey laws and want their community to be a better place. But these days many of us are also citizens of the online world. We participate in discussions, share photos, and get help using websites. While this makes communication faster and easier, it can also cause problems. Stewart is a good guy. Six Unforgettable CyberBullying Cases The truth behind 6 disturbing cyberbullying cases that turned into suicide stories… Also browse: 100 Must-Read Cyberbullying Articles and The 2014 Cyberbullying Statistics What is Cyberbullying? Wikipedia defines cyberbullying as, “Cyberbullying is the use of information technology to repeatedly harm or harass other people in a deliberate manner. According to U.S.

Welcome, Parents — ikeepsafe.org You can help your child become a responsible, ethical digital citizen with healthy online relationships. To do that, you’ll use the same successful parenting skills that you’re already using at home. Resilient digital citizens recognize and seek out the 3Cs—appropriate contact, content, and conduct—in all digital settings (e.g., iPods,instant messaging, chat, computer games, game consoles, cell phones, text messaging, webcams) The Power of Educational Technology: A Design Thinking approach to Digital Citizenship Design Thinking is a problem solving methodology used by people all over the world to come up with new ideas. Recently there has been a lot of discussion about how to integrate this approach into education. This summer I took two Online courses to learn more about the process. I am very interested in ways to use this approach in my own teaching.

Cyberbullying - what it is, how it works and how to understand and deal with cyberbullies what is it? :: how it works :: why cyberbully? :: prevention :: take action :: what's the law? Cyber-bullies could face two years in jail under new internet troll rules People convicted of cyber-bullying and text message abuse could face up to two years in prison, under plans backed by the government. The justice secretary, Chris Grayling, has backed an amendment to the criminal justice bill that would target new rules at combating trolls that sexually harass and verbally abuse people on the internet or via mobile phones in England and Wales. The amendment, due to be discussed in parliament on Thursday, was proposed by the Conservative MP for Ealing Central and Acton Angie Bray, after one of her constituents said her 14-year-old daughter had been “verbally raped” by 2,000 obscene texts sent by an older man, who escaped conviction. “Just tabled amendment to criminal justice bill to make life just a bit harder for cyber-bullies and sex pests using texts to harass victims,” said Bray on Twitter. Offences such as internet trolling fall under the Malicious Communications Act, which can only be tried in a magistrates’ court.

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