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Ubiquitous computing

Ubiquitous computing
Ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) is a concept in software engineering and computer science where computing is made to appear everywhere and anywhere. In contrast to desktop computing, ubiquitous computing can occur using any device, in any location, and in any format. A user interacts with the computer, which can exist in many different forms, including laptop computers, tablets and terminals in everyday objects such as a fridge or a pair of glasses. The underlying technologies to support ubiquitous computing include Internet, advanced middleware, operating system, mobile code, sensors, microprocessors, new I/O and user interfaces, networks, mobile protocols, location and positioning and new materials. This new paradigm is also described as pervasive computing, ambient intelligence,[1] ambient media[2] or 'everyware'.[3] Each term emphasizes slightly different aspects. Core concepts[edit] Dust: miniaturized devices can be without visual output displays, e.g. Layer 1: task management layer

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubiquitous_computing

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Human-centered computing (discipline) Human-centered computing (HCC) is a broadly defined interdisciplinary buzzword concerned with computing and computational artifacts as they relate to the human condition. Researchers and practitioners who affiliate themselves with human-centered computing usually come from one or more of the following disciplines: human factors, computer science, sociology, psychology, cognitive science, anthropology, communication studies, graphic design, science and technology studies, and industrial design. The term "human-centered computing" originates from Rob Kling and Susan Leigh Star in the paper "Human Centered Systems in the Perspective of Organizational and Social Informatics".[1] According to Kling and Star, the key feature of human-centered computing systems is that "knowledge of human users and the social context in which systems are expected to operate become integrated into the computer science agenda, even at the earliest stages of research and development." Career[edit]

Five "Free Energy" Devices that Could Save You Thousands of Dollars Image credit: www.flickr.com/photos/cr03/42435041 “Free energy” devices are the most important inventions for helping us solve many of our financial problems. Many of these “free energy” generators have the ability to generate energy at a fraction of the cost of traditional energy generators. Imagine having a “free energy” device in your home that generates enough electricity to power all your appliances and electronic devices for the cost of 10 dollars or less per month. How would that change your financial life?

Automotive lighting The lighting system of a motor vehicle consists of lighting and signalling devices mounted or integrated to various parts of a motor vehicle. These may include the front, sides, rear and, in some cases, the top of the vehicle. The purpose of this system is to provide illumination for the driver. This enables safe vehicle operation after dark and increases the conspicuity of the vehicle. The lighting system allows other drivers and pedestrians to observe the vehicle's presence, position, size, direction of travel, and the driver's intentions regarding direction and speed of travel.

Radio-frequency identification Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless use of electromagnetic fields to transfer data, for the purposes of automatically identifying and tracking tags attached to objects. The tags contain electronically stored information. Some tags are powered by electromagnetic induction from magnetic fields produced near the reader. Organic mega flow battery promises breakthrough for renewable energy A team of Harvard scientists and engineers has demonstrated a new type of battery that could fundamentally transform the way electricity is stored on the grid, making power from renewable energy sources such as wind and solar far more economical and reliable. The novel battery technology is reported in a paper published in Nature on January 9. Under the OPEN 2012 program, the Harvard team received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to develop the innovative grid-scale battery and plans to work with ARPA-E to catalyze further technological and market breakthroughs over the next several years. The paper reports a metal-free flow battery that relies on the electrochemistry of naturally abundant, inexpensive, small organic (carbon-based) molecules called quinones, which are similar to molecules that store energy in plants and animals. The battery was designed, built, and tested in the laboratory of Michael J.

Photodiode A photodiode is a semiconductor device that converts light into current. The current is generated when photons are absorbed in the photodiode. A small amount of current is also produced when no light is present. Photodiodes may contain optical filters, built-in lenses, and may have large or small surface areas. Photodiodes usually have a slower response time as their surface area increases.

Near field communication A summary of near-field communication Near field communication (NFC) is a set of ideas and technology that enables smartphones and other devices to establish radio communication with each other by touching the devices together or bringing them into proximity to a distance of typically 10 cm (3.9 in) or less. Early business models such as advertising and industrial applications were not successful, having been overtaken by alternative technologies such as barcodes or UHF tags, but what distinguishes NFC is that devices are often cloud connected. Let's Play NSA! The Hackers Open-Sourcing Top Secret Spy Tools Last August, at Defcon, the hacker conference in As quiet descended over an eager audience of hundreds of hackers, Ossmann stopped and issued a warning. “If you don't want to hear about leaked classified information, you can leave now,” he told the crowd. Ossmann was acknowledging a legal barrier: if you're a government employee, you're prevented by law from reading or hearing about leaked classified information.

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