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New chemical circuits make becoming a cyborg even cooler

New chemical circuits make becoming a cyborg even cooler

http://io9.com/5916972/new-chemical-circuits-make-becoming-a-cyborg-even-cooler

Related:  Cyborgenic Reengineering the Human Body

Digital Tattoo Gets Under Your Skin to Monitor Blood Bioengineering doctoral student Kate Balaconis shines the iPhone reader against her tattooless arm. Maybe tattoos aren’t just for Harley riders or rebellious teens after all. In a few years, diabetics might get inked up with digital tats that communicate with an iPhone to monitor their blood. Instead of the dye used for tribal arm bands and Chinese characters, these tattoos will contain nanosensors that read the wearer’s blood levels of sodium, glucose and even alcohol with the help of an iPhone 4 camera. Dr.

Electronic tattoo An ultra-thin electronic device that attaches to the skin like a stick on tattoo can measure electrical activity of the human body like heart, brain waves and other vital signs without the bulky electrodes used in current monitoring. process[edit] These tattoos are similar to those in children's fake tattoos. It usually starts out on a sheet of plastic, is then applied to the skin and rubbed on from outside the plastic, then the plastic is peeled away, leaving only a very thin, rubber patch that has a layer of flexible silicon wires. It is ultra-thin slices of plastic or rubber that encases tiny silicon wires, sensors, radios, cameras and even electricity generating cells. These tattoos stick to your skin like a Band-Aid and are typically temporary, lasting three to five days.

Human enhancement An electrically powered exoskeleton suit in development as of 2010 by Tsukuba University of Japan. Human enhancement is "any attempt to temporarily or permanently overcome the current limitations of the human body through natural or artificial means. It is the use of technological means to select or alter human characteristics and capacities, whether or not the alteration results in characteristics and capacities that lie beyond the existing human range." [1][2][3] Technologies[edit] Existing technologies[edit] Cyborg A cyborg (short for "cybernetic organism") is a theoretical or fictional being with both organic and biomechatronic parts. The term was coined in 1960 by Manfred Clynes and Nathan S. Kline.[1] D. S. Halacy's Cyborg: Evolution of the Superman in 1965 featured an introduction which spoke of a "new frontier" that was "not merely space, but more profoundly the relationship between 'inner space' to 'outer space' – a bridge...between mind and matter

9 Implants that make human healthy body even more useful Here’s a list of 9 ways you can modify your body to be even more useful, from bionic implants to portable power generators. 1. RFID Chips – A nice and easy way to start out with body hacking is to implant an RFID chip into you. An RFID chip is just a passive antenna that’s pre-configured to transmit a specific code when it’s brought near an RFID reader. Generally, RFID is used as a key of sorts; so for example, you can set up your computer or your phone to unlock only when you pick them up. Or install an RFID-enabled deadbolt on your front door and an RFID reader in your car and you won’t need to carry your keys around anymore. Human Augmentation: Blurring the Line Between Biology & Technology - Futurism Human Augmentation: Blurring the Line Between Biology & Technology Share This Tweet This Posted by Alex Klokus You must sign in or join to comment! Join

Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. This is according to a study from Umeå University in Sweden published in the journal Nature Neuroscience. A fundamental characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, so-called first-order neurons in the tactile system, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin. 3D Printed Body Parts Go Mainstream 3D printing technology has been around for two decades, but the price has come down in recent years and more people have been able to make use of it. Consequently, we've started to be able to really tap into its vast potential. 3D printed products are being spewed out left, right and center; from the building blocks of houses to replica shark skin. It almost seems as though the capabilities are endless, and the technology is not anticipated to slow down any time soon.

Singularity: Kurzweil on 2045, When Humans, Machines Merge On Feb. 15, 1965, a diffident but self-possessed high school student named Raymond Kurzweil appeared as a guest on a game show called I've Got a Secret. He was introduced by the host, Steve Allen, then he played a short musical composition on a piano. The idea was that Kurzweil was hiding an unusual fact and the panelists — they included a comedian and a former Miss America — had to guess what it was. On the show (see the clip on YouTube), the beauty queen did a good job of grilling Kurzweil, but the comedian got the win: the music was composed by a computer. Kurzweil got $200.

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