background preloader

Sizes of the Universe Poster

Sizes of the Universe Poster
Share this infographic on your site! <a href=" src=" alt="Sizes of the Universe" width="500" border="0" /></a><br />Source: <a href=" Sleuth</a> Embed this infographic on your site! Have you ever wondered how big the universe is? Maybe you've wondered how big Texas is in comparison to Pluto? Interact: Magnifying the Universe Interactive Infographic Related:  échelles/taille de l'UniversSpace

Magnifying the Universe Embed this infographic on your site! <iframe width="500" height="323" scrolling="no" src=" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br />Copyright 2012. <a href=" the Universe</a> by <a href=" Sleuth</a>. The above is an interactive infographic. We have also developed a complimentary poster that you can view here: Sizes of the Universe poster. Introduction: This interactive infographic from Number Sleuth accurately illustrates the scale of over 100 items within the observable universe ranging from galaxies to insects, nebulae and stars to molecules and atoms. While other sites have tried to magnify the universe, no one else has done so with real photographs and 3D renderings. How To Use: Step 1:To experience this interactive infographic in full screen (our recommendation) click the "Full Screen" button in the top right corner of the infographic. Credits:

11 cheap gifts guaranteed to impress science geeks Science comes up with a lot of awesome stuff, and you don't need a Ph.D, a secret lab, or government funding to get your hands on some of the coolest discoveries. We've got a list of 11 mostly affordable gifts that are guaranteed to blow your mind, whether or not you're a science geek. Click on any image to see it enlarged. 1. Aerogel Also known as frozen smoke, Aerogel is the world's lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. Aerogel isn't just neat, it's useful. Price: $35 2. Inside these sealed glass balls live shrimp, algae, and bacteria, all swimming around in filtered seawater. EcoSpheres came out of research looking at ways to develop self-contained ecosystems for long duration space travel. Price: $80 3. NASA has been trying to figure out how to get a sample of rock back from Mars for a while now. Every once in a while, a meteorite smashes into Mars hard enough to eject some rocks out into orbit around the sun. Price: $70+ 4. Price: $150 5. Price: $110 6. Price: $80 7. Price: $15 8.

100,000 Stars Physics 20b: Introduction to Cosmology - Spring 2010 - Download free content from UC Irvine The Scale of the Universe Interactive Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2012 March 12 The Scale of the Universe - Interactive Flash Animation Credit & Copyright: Cary & Michael Huang Explanation: What does the universe look like on small scales? On large scales? Tomorrow's picture: dust before galaxies Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD at NASA / GSFC& Michigan Tech.

New comet likely to impress when it passes closest to Earth in December By Alan Pickup, The GuardianSunday, October 14, 2012 20:16 EDT A comet found recently beyond the orbit of Jupiter could well become spectacular late next year and may be a sibling of one of the most celebrated comets of all time. What is formally known as Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was not at first recognised as a comet when it was spotted as a 19th magnitude object using a small Russian telescope of the International Scientific Optical Network on 21 September. Earlier images have been found stretching back to last year, allowing its orbit to be calculated and showing that it is destined to sweep within 1.2 million km of the Sun’s surface at perihelion on 28 November 2013. Some predictions claim that it could rival the full moon in brightness at that time. Its orbit resembles that of Kirch’s Comet, the Great Comet of 1680, which hangs over Rotterdam in our illustration from a painting by the Dutch artist Lieve Verschuier. © Guardian News and Media 2012

The Visible Universe, Then and Now Before the telescope was invented in 1608, our picture of the universe consisted of six planets, our moon, the sun and any stars we could see in the Milky Way galaxy. But as our light-gathering capabilities have grown, so too have the boundaries of the visible universe. Our interactive map shows how the known universe has grown from 1950 to 2011. In the late 1700s, William Herschel, an English astronomer using a telescope with an 18.7-inch aperture, made the first systematic surveys of the skies, revealing more than 2,000 distant galaxies, nebulae and other objects invisible to the naked eye. In 1948, astronomers erected the 200-inch Hale Telescope at Palomar Observatory in California, and now, large-scale projects such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and NASA's Kepler mission use sensitive digital imaging and computational power to collect and analyze hundreds of terabytes of data on millions of galaxies billions of light-years from Earth.

Earth-size planet found: Lightest exoplanet yet orbits Sun-like star Alpha Centauri B Newly found world orbits Alpha Centauri B, 4.3 light years from our SunIt is the lightest exoplanet yet found orbiting a Sun-like starIt is thought to be too hot for life, and there is likely no water presentBut presence suggests there may be other planets within the same system By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 08:18 GMT, 17 October 2012 | Updated: 12:37 GMT, 17 October 2012 An Earth-sized planet has been found orbiting a star in Alpha Centauri, our nearest neighbouring solar system. The mystery world circling Alpha Centauri B is thought to be much too hot to support life, with surface temperatures of around 1,500C. But astronomers say it is likely to be part of a more extensive solar system containing other planets, one or more of which might be habitable. Scroll down for video Next-door neighbour: An artist's impression of the recently found planet orbiting Alpha Centauri B, a member of the triple star system that is the closest to our own 'Alpha Centauri is our closest neighbour.

The Elegant Universe: Pt 1 The Elegant Universe: Part 3 PBS Airdate: November 4, 2003 NARRATOR: Now, on NOVA, take a thrill ride into a world stranger than science fiction, where you play the game by breaking some rules, where a new view of the universe pushes you beyond the limits of your wildest imagination. This is the world of "string theory," a way of describing every force and all matter from an atom to earth, to the end of the galaxies—from the birth of time to its final tick, in a single theory, a "Theory of Everything." BRIAN GREENE (Columbia University): And no matter how many times I come here, I never seem to get used to it. NARRATOR: Can he help us solve the greatest puzzle of modern physics—that our understanding of the universe is based on two sets of laws that don't agree? NARRATOR: Resolving that contradiction eluded even Einstein, who made it his final quest. BRIAN GREENE: We really may live in a universe with more dimensions than meet the eye. S. BRIAN GREENE:The atmosphere was electric. S.

Dark alien planet discovered by NASA An alien world blacker than coal, the darkest planet known, has been discovered in the galaxy. The world in question is a giant the size of Jupiter known as TrES-2b. NASA's Kepler spacecraft detected it lurking around the yellow sun-like star GSC 03549-02811 some 750 lightyears away in the direction of the constellation Draco. The researchers found this gas giant reflects less than 1 percent of the sunlight falling on it, making it darker than any planet or moon seen up to now. [The Strangest Alien Planets] "It's just ridiculous how dark this planet is, how alien it is compared to anything we have in our solar system," study lead-author David Kipping, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told SPACE.com. "However, it's not completely pitch black," co-author David Spiegel of Princeton University said in a statement. "It's a mystery as to what's causing it to be so dark," Kipping said. This article was reprinted with permission from SPACE.com.

La plus grande image du ciel jamais obtenue « meridianes La collaboration Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III, qui regroupe notamment des chercheurs du CNRS et du CEA, vient de mettre à la disposition de la communauté scientifique internationale le plus grand relevé du ciel jamais effectué, à l’occasion de la réunion annuelle de la Société Américaine d’Astronomie qui se tient à Seattle du 10 au 13 janvier 2011. Ce relevé a permis de construire une image dont on a extrait un catalogue de sources d’une grande partie du ciel en cinq couleurs et d’une qualité sans précédent (couverture du ciel, profondeur, précision de la mesure des luminosités). Ce catalogue, qui contient environ 470 millions d’objets (galaxies, étoiles, quasars…), fait l’objet d’une publication dans la revueAstrophysical Journal Supplements. L’image du ciel obtenue est d’une résolution d’un térapixel (mille milliards de pixels) et en cinq couleurs. Like this: J'aime chargement…

Top 10 Strangest Things In Space Space Let’s be honest: space is an absolutely crazy place. Most science fiction writers throw in a planet with two stars that looks vaguely like Southern California, and call it a day. But the cosmos is a lot stranger than we give it credit for: Everyone knows that shooting stars are just meteors entering the atmosphere, right? If you didn’t, congratulations—you just failed the fourth grade. When a binary star system is gobbled down by the supermassive black hole (that’s the scientific term, by the way) at the center of a galaxy, one of the two partners is consumed, while the other is ejected at high speed. Gliese 581 c wants to kill you. This planet orbits a red dwarf star, many times smaller than our Sun, with a luminosity of only 1.3% of our sun. The tidal locking of the planet alone results in some pretty odd features. Living on Gliese 581 c would have its challenges, though. As if one or two giant, fiery balls of gas weren’t enough, here we have the Castor System.

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system Mercury Venus Earth You Are Here Moon Mars Jupiter Io Europa Ganymede Callisto Saturn Titan Uranus Neptune Pluto(we still love you) That was about 10 million km (6,213,710 mi) just now. Pretty empty out here. Here comes our first planet... As it turns out, things are pretty far apart. We’ll be coming up on a new planet soon. Most of space is just space. Halfway home. Destination: Mars! It would take about seven months to travel this distance in a spaceship. Sit back and relax. When are we gonna be there? Seriously. This is where we might at least see some asteroids to wake us up. I spy, with my little eye... something black. If you were on a road trip, driving at 75mi/hr, it would have taken you over 500 years to get here from earth. All these distances are just averages, mind you. If you plan it right, you can actually move relatively quickly between planets. Pretty close to Jupiter now. Sorry. Lots of time to think out here... Pop the champagne! We're always trying to come up with metaphors for big numbers.

Scientists say mysterious 'Oumuamua' object could be an alien spacecraft Get the Mach newsletter. Nov. 5, 2018 / 7:06 PM GMT By David Freeman Maybe it's an alien spacecraft. Scientists have been puzzling over Oumuamua ever since the mysterious space object was observed tumbling past the sun in late 2017. Now a pair of Harvard researchers are raising the possibility that Oumuamua is an alien spacecraft. The researchers aren't claiming outright that aliens sent Oumuamua. Who would have sent such a spacecraft our way — and why? "It is impossible to guess the purpose behind Oumuamua without more data," Avi Loeb, chairman of Harvard's astronomy department and a co-author of the paper, told NBC News MACH in an email. Earthlings have launched simple solar-powered lightsails of our own, and Loeb is an adviser to Breakthrough Starshot, an initiative that plans to send a fleet of tiny laser-powered lightsail craft to the nearest star system. Coryn Bailer-Jones, an astronomer at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany, voiced similar objections.

Related: