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All Empires: Online History Community

All Empires: Online History Community

http://www.allempires.com/

Related:  romeWorldMiddle East

Secrets of Lost Empires Welcome to the companion Web site to the NOVA program "Roman Bath," scheduled for rebroadcast on January 31, 2006. In the film, which is a part of the NOVA series Secrets of Lost Empires, an international crew of archeologists, engineers, and historians designs, builds, and tests a functioning Roman bath in the Turkish countryside. Here's what you'll find online: A Day at the Baths Wander through the frigidarium, tepidarium, caldarium, and other vital rooms in our online reconstruction of the famous Baths of Caracalla. Construct an Aqueduct (Hot Science) The Emperor has appointed you Chief Water Engineer on an aqueduct-building project. To successfully ferry water from the hills, you'll need to learn when to use a tunnel or a covered trench, a wall, or an arcade. Good luck!

Classical Period, 900 - 290 BC Detailed Timeline of European History Classical Period (900 - 290 BC) Beginning of Western Culture and Philosophy Go to European History Interactive Map Classical Period Europe Interactive Map Note: From Tribal to Advanced Organization. Europe Europe is the second smallest of the seven continents covering roughly 2% of the earth’s surface. The name 'Europe’ has long been thought to have been derived from the ancient myth of Zeus and Europa. According to this tale, the great god Zeus, seeing the lovely Phoenician princess Europa bathing (or, according to other versions, playing with her handmaidens) by the sea shore, transformed himself into a magnificent white bull and slowly approached her from the sea.

Rome Rome (/ˈroʊm/; Italian: Roma pronounced [ˈroːma] ( ); Latin: Rōma) is a city and special comune (named "Roma Capitale") in Italy. Rome is the capital of Italy and also of the Province of Rome and of the region of Lazio. With 2.7 million residents in 1,285.3 km2 (496.3 sq mi), it is also the country's largest and most populated comune and fourth-most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. The urban area of Rome extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of around 3.8 million.[2] Between 3.2 and 4.2 million people live in Rome metropolitan area.[3][4][5][6][7] The city is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, on the Tiber within Lazio (Latium). The Vatican City is an independent country within the city boundaries of Rome, the only example of a country within a city existing.

Tradition and Memory: World Civilizations to 1500 Welcome to the World Wide Web resources, student work, and student discussion attached to General Education 110, World Cultures to 1500, taught by Richard Hooker at Washington State University. This web course has a long and productive history involving students in collaborative and constructivist work with each other and with others outside the course. This course is now being offered as a distance-learning course integrating distant learners with the on-site classroom. If you are not taking the course, feel free to look at our schedule and our readings and join in on our discussions and our "discussion quizzes" with your ideas and knowledge. Please limit your discussion to material around the current week's work; if you have comments or ideas about other parts of the course or readings, send them to me. Any great mail I receive will be forwarded to the discussion group.

The Early Middle East Symbols of the three religions that originated in the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. "The cradle of civilization." Throughout the centuries, historians have used these powerful words to describe the Middle East. In the ancient Middle East, many great civilizations rose and fell. The religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam each trace their origins back to this part of the world. Keats-Shelley Memorial House Coordinates: The Keats-Shelley House in Rome The Keats-Shelley Memorial House is a museum in Rome, Italy, commemorating the Romantic poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley. The museum houses one of the world's most extensive collections of memorabilia, letters, manuscripts, and paintings relating to Keats and Shelley, as well as Byron, Wordsworth, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Oscar Wilde, and others. It is located on the second floor of the building situated just to the south of the base of the Spanish Steps and east of the Piazza di Spagna.

The 9,000-year-old underground megalithic settlement of Atlit Yam Not far off the coast of the village of Atlit in the Mediterranean Sea, near Haifa in Israel, lies the submerged ruins of the ancient Neolithic site of Atlit Yam. The prehistoric settlement, which dates back to the 7 th millennium BC, has been so well preserved by the sandy seabed that a mysterious stone circle still stands as it was first erected, and dozens of human skeletons lay undisturbed in their graves. Atlit Yam is one of the oldest and largest sunken settlements ever found and sheds new light on the daily lives of its ancient inhabitants. Today, Atlit Yam lies between 8 – 12 metres beneath sea level and covered an area of 40,000 square metres.

The Crusades - home page Return from the Crusade by Karl Friedrich Lessing Rheinisches Landesmuseum This site is a fully virtual course offered through Boise State University. The course materials are open to the general public and to other educators. Please see the Visitor Center for details. Visitor Center Classroom Spanish Steps The Spanish Steps (Italian: Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti) are a set of steps in Rome, Italy, climbing a steep slope between the Piazza di Spagna at the base and Piazza Trinità dei Monti, dominated by the Trinità dei Monti church at the top. The Scalinata is the widest staircase in Europe.[1] History[edit] Following a competition in 1717 the steps were designed by the little-known Francesco de Sanctis,[2] though Alessandro Specchi was long thought to have produced the winning entry. Generations of heated discussion over how the steep slope to the church on a shoulder of the Pincio should be urbanised preceded the final execution. Archival drawings from the 1580s show that Pope Gregory XIII was interested in constructing a stair to the recently completed façade of the French church.

Sakamoto Ryoma and Nakaoka Shintaro: Very Different, Yet Very Similar The alliance between Satsuma and Choshu, concluded in early 1866, was a turning point in the revolution. Sakamoto Ryoma’s biographers never fail to point out that the epochal event was brought about by a political outlaw who considered himself “a nobody.” While Ryoma receives so much of the historical limelight, it must not be forgotten that Nakaoka Shintaro, Ryoma’s cohort from Tosa, also played an indispensable role in bringing about the Satsuma-Choshu Alliance. Until the alliance was concluded, Satsuma and Choshu were bitter enemies.

GREAT MILITARY BATTLES At the height of the Assyrian Empire (700 BC) she possessed the most powerful army yet seen in the ancient world, and would go on to dominate the for three hundred years. Expansion began in the reign of King Ashurnasirpal II (883 – 859) BC whose campains would reveal the true military skill on which the Assyrians would conquer, their superior tactics and technology in siege warfare. In his first campaign, Ashurnasirpal captured five cities in an era when other warlords would have regarded the capture of one a successful conclusion to hostilities. Ashurnasirpal’s son Shalmaneser III (859 - 824) BC also adopted a policy of conquest.

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