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Andrew Carnegie

Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie (/kɑrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑrnɨɡi/ KAR-nə-gee or /kɑrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[2] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish American industrialist who led the enormous expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century. He was also one of the highest profile philanthropists of his era and had given away almost 90 percent – amounting to, in 1919, $350 million[3] (in 2014, $4.76 billion) – of his fortune to charities and foundations by the time of his death. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his very poor parents in 1848. Carnegie started as a telegrapher and by the 1860s had investments in railroads, railroad sleeping cars, bridges and oil derricks. Biography Early life Railroads Carnegie age 16, with brother Thomas 1860–1865: The Civil War

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Carnegie

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The Gospel of Wealth "Savage Wealth",[2] more commonly known as "The Gospel of Wealth",[3] is an article written by Andrew Carnegie in 1889[4] that describes the responsibility of philanthropy by the new upper class of self-made rich. Carnegie proposed that the best way of dealing with the new phenomenon of wealth inequality was for the wealthy to redistribute their surplus means in a responsible and thoughtful manner. This approach was contrasted with traditional bequest (patrimony), where wealth is handed down to heirs, and other forms of bequest e.g. where wealth is willed to the state for public purposes.

Barbara Dickson Barbara Ruth Dickson, OBE (born Dunfermline, Fife, 27 September 1947)[1] is a Scottish singer whose hits include "I Know Him So Well" and "January February". Dickson has placed fifteen albums in the UK Albums Chart from 1977 to date, and had a number of hit singles, including four which reached the Top 20 in the UK Singles Chart.[2] The Scotsman newspaper has described her as Scotland's best-selling female singer in terms of the numbers of hit chart singles and albums she has achieved in the UK since 1976.[3] Career[edit] Early years[edit] Dickson went to Woodmill High. Previously she lived in "Dolly Town", which no longer exists as it was demolished in the early 1970s.

St. Bartholomew's Day massacre The St. Bartholomew's Day massacre (Massacre de la Saint-Barthélemy in French) in 1572 was a targeted group of assassinations, followed by a wave of Roman Catholic mob violence, both directed against the Huguenots (French Calvinist Protestants), during the French Wars of Religion. Traditionally believed to have been instigated by Catherine de' Medici, the mother of King Charles IX, the massacre took place five days after the wedding of the king's sister Margaret to the Protestant Henry III of Navarre (the future Henry IV of France). Ginni Rometty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Early life and education[edit] Rometty graduated from the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University in 1979 with high honors, receiving a bachelor's degree in computer science and electrical engineering.[11] Rometty was a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, eventually serving as its president.[12] Career[edit]

Fabian Society Originally, the Fabian society was committed to the establishment of a socialist economy, alongside a commitment to British imperialism as a progressive and modernizing force.[3] Organisational history[edit] Establishment[edit] Ian Anderson Early life[edit] Ian Anderson was born the youngest of three siblings. His father, James Anderson, ran the RSA Boiler Fluid Company[2] in East Port, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.

Huguenot The Huguenots (/ˈhjuːɡənɒt/ or /huːɡəˈnoʊ/; French: [yɡno], [yɡəno]) were members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France during the 16th and 17th centuries. French Protestants were inspired by the writings of John Calvin in the 1530s, and they were called Huguenots by the 16th century. By the end of the 17th century and into the 18th century, roughly 500,000 Huguenots had fled France during a series of religious persecutions. They relocated to Protestant nations, such as England, Wales, Scotland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, the Dutch Republic, the Electorate of Brandenburg, Electorate of the Palatinate (both in the Holy Roman Empire), the Duchy of Prussia, the Channel Islands and also to Cape Colony in South Africa and several of the English colonies of North America which were willing to accept them. Etymology[edit]

Charles M. Schwab - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For the founder and chairman of the Charles Schwab Corporation brokerage firm, see Charles R. Schwab Charles Michael Schwab (February 18, 1862 – September 18, 1939) was an American steel magnate. Under his leadership, Bethlehem Steel became the second largest steel maker in the United States, and one of the most important heavy manufacturers in the world. Early life[edit] Charles Michael Schwab was born in Williamsburg, Pennsylvania, to John Anthony Schwab and Pauline (née Farabaugh).[1][2] All four of his grandparents were Roman Catholic immigrants from Germany.[2] Schwab was raised in Loretto, Pennsylvania, which he considered his home town.

In Memory of W. B. Yeats Wystan Hugh Auden was born in York, England, on February 21, 1907. He moved to Birmingham during childhood and was educated at Christ Church, Oxford. As a young man he was influenced by the poetry of Thomas Hardy and Robert Frost, as well as William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Old English verse. At Oxford his precocity as a poet was immediately apparent, and he formed lifelong friendships with two fellow writers, Stephen Spender and Christopher Isherwood. Stuart Adamson Stuart Adamson (11 April 1958 – 16 December 2001), born William Stuart Adamson, was an English-born Scottish guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter, described by broadcaster and DJ John Peel as “Britain’s answer to Jimi Hendrix”.[1] He founded the Scottish art-punk band Skids and later the more mainstream rock group Big Country, as well as the 1990s alternative country rock act The Raphaels. Early life[edit] Although Adamson was born in Manchester, both his parents were Scottish, and the family returned to Scotland when he was four.

French Wars of Religion The exact number of wars and their respective dates are the subject of continued debate by historians; some assert that the Edict of Nantes in 1598 concluded the wars, although a resurgence of rebellious activity following this leads some to believe the Peace of Alais in 1629 is the actual conclusion. However, the Massacre of Vassy in 1562 is agreed to begin the Wars of Religion and the Edict of Nantes at least ended this series of conflicts. During this time, complex diplomatic negotiations and agreements of peace were followed by renewed conflict and power struggles.

Nick Vujicic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Nicholas James "Nick" Vujicic (/ˈvɔɪtʃɪtʃ/ VOY-i-chich; Serbian: Николас Џејмс Вујичић, Nikolas Džejms Vujičić; born 4 December 1982) is an Australian Christian evangelist and motivational speaker born with tetra-amelia syndrome, a rare disorder characterised by the absence of all four limbs. Although he was an otherwise healthy baby, He has two siblings Michelle, and Aaron. As a child, he struggled mentally and emotionally as well as physically, but eventually came to terms with his disability and, at the age of seventeen, started his own non-profit organisation, Life Without Limbs.

Spies by Michael Frayn What is a plot? For the reader, it is the discovery of concealed connections between events in a narrative. Michael Frayn's Spies is a novel with a carefully engineered plot, and a story whose two main characters are determined to uncover the sinister logic of apparently ordinary events. They are themselves looking for a plot.

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