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Earth Exploration Toolbook

Earth Exploration Toolbook
Awarded Science Magazine's Science Prize for Online Resources in Education (SPORE), September 30, 2011 AAAS Press Release What is the Earth Exploration Toolbook? Developed by teams of scientists and educators, the Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) is a collection of online Earth system science activities. Within the context of a case study, each chapter guides users through a step-by-step process in which they access data and use analysis tools to explore real issues and questions in Earth system science. Who is it for? Earth Exploration Toolbook chapters are written to the teacher, generally at the secondary and college level. How can I learn more? Come on into the site! Related:  Earth Sciences

Breathingearth - CO2, birth & death rates by country, simulated real-time PowerUp the Game - have fun while learning about engineering and the environment PowerUp the Game is a 3D, action strategy, multi-player, free, online game. The premise is that the Planet Helios is being destroyed from the side effects of burning fossil fuels for energy. The environment is damaged with CO2, pollution, extreme weather, and more. Players work together in extreme environments to try to save the planet, learning about environmental issues and designing systems to harness renewable energy. It's fun, it takes critical-thinking and problem solving skills, along with teamwork and is educational. It is available for Windows and Mac OS. The only issue I see is that it may be blocked in some districts, like mine, because it is a "game." The game was developed in cooperation with museums, energy agencies, and educators (including Education Connection in CT - one of our area resource centers.) Check it out.

Density Tower - Magic with Science at Steve Spangler Science Start your column by pouring the honey into the cylinder. Now, you will pour each liquid SLOWLY into the container, one at a time. It is very important to pour the liquids slowly and into the center of the cylinder. Make sure that the liquids do not touch the sides of the cylinder while you are pouring. It’s okay if the liquids mix a little as you are pouring. The layers will always even themselves out because of the varying densities. The same amount of two different liquids will have different weights because they have different masses. To test this, you might want to set up a scale and measure each of the liquids that you poured into your column. Density is basically how much "stuff" is smashed into a particular area... or a comparison between an object's mass and volume. The same goes for the small objects that you dropped into your density column. In the materials, we had you grab a bunch of miscellaneous tiny objects. Why do you think these two phenomena happen?

Edheads TckTckTck | the Global Campaign for Climate Action Great Games and Simulation Tools for teaching STEM Content! (P2) It’s great to be a STEM teacher these days! We have a plethora of technology tools to help us improve teaching and learning in our classroom. One of the greatest tools for teaching science and math that I have used are online simulations. The following simulation products are my favorites and are similar in many ways. I use all of them in my classroom several times a week, and almost daily to help me bring abstract concepts to life for my students. Great Interactive Simulations: They are vibrant, colorful, fun, and interactive. Teacher Materials and Student Lab Sheets: Each of these programs includes student lab sheets to help guide student investigations. Individualized: Each of these simulations can be assigned to individual students for them to complete as a station or center activity, for homework, or for remediation on a concept that they need extra practice with. Great Ways to Use Simulations in the Classroom The Best STEM Simulation Products Discovery Education Science Phet

Lawrence Hall of Science - 24/7 Science Welcome to Twenty Four Seven Science! Activity Collections View All Citizen Science Activities How fast does the wind blow? So many questions—and so many ways to find answers! Bridge Builders How Fast Is the Wind Gooo! Filling Without Spilling Parachute Drop Crystals Bird Beaks Sticky Situations Oil Spill How Old is Your Penny? Measure Yourself Where Do Plants Grow? Bug Hunt! Afterschool KidzScience Afterschool KidzScience AfterSchool KidzScience™ kits are designed specifically for children in grades 3 - 5 in out-of-school settings. Check Out Science Check Out Science Check Out Science makes doing science with your family easy, no scientific expertise necessary. Explore Your World Explore Your World You don't have to trek through a rainforest, blast off for space, or dive to the deep sea to explore your world. Roadside Heritage Roadside Heritage Roadside Heritage is an informal science educational project with its origins in the stunning landscape of the Eastern Sierra along the 395 scenic byway. Save Sam!

A History of Climate Science Skeptical Science takes a different approach to Naomi Oreskes' Science paper who sorted her papers into "explicit endorsement of the consensus position", "rejection of the consensus position" and everything else (neutral). In this case, the backbone of our site is our list of climate myths. Whenever a climate link is added to our database, it is matched to any relevant climate myths. Therefore, each link is assigned "skeptic", "neutral" or "proAGW" whether it confirms or refutes the climate myth. This means a skeptic paper doesn't necessarily "reject the consensus position" that humans are causing global warming. There are a large number of neutral papers. So yes, categorisation can get a little complicated and I expect there will continue to be discussion on the issue of classification.

Understanding Evolution The bacteria that changed the world - May, 2017 The make-up of Earth's atmosphere, once the domain of Earth science textbooks, has become an increasingly "hot" news topic in recent decades, as we struggle to curb global warming by limiting the carbon dioxide that human activity produces. While the changes that humanity has wrought on the planet are dramatic, this isn’t the first time that one species has changed Earth’s atmosphere. Three billion years ago, there was no free oxygen in the atmosphere at all. Life was anaerobic, meaning that it did not need oxygen to live and grow. That all changed due to the evolution of Cyanobacteria, a group of single-celled, blue-green bacteria. Read the rest of the story here | See the Evo in the News archive

Climate Science Info Zone - There are many institutions and organisations around the world researching climate science, how our climate is changing, and ways of responding. Here are just a few… British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Energy Saving Trust (EST) Environmental Change Institute (ECI) European Space Agency (ESA) The Geological Society (GS) Grantham Institute for Climate Change (GICC) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Met Office (MO) National Academy of Sciences (NAS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Oceanography Centre (NOC) The Royal Society (RS) Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (TCCCR) UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) World Meteorological Organization (WMO)

The Earth Exploration Toolbook is amazing. I highly recommend it. Developed by teams of scientists and educators, the Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) is a collection of online Earth system science activities. Each activity, or chapter, introduces one or more scientific data sets and analysis tools that enables users to explore some aspect of the Earth system.

Within the context of a case study, each chapter guides users through a step-by-step process in which they access data and use analysis tools to explore real issues and questions in Earth system science. In the course of completing a chapter, users produce and analyze maps, graphs, images, or other data products. The ultimate goal of each activity is to build users' skills and confidence so they can use data to conduct their own investigations of the Earth system.

Who is it for?
Earth Exploration Toolbook chapters are written to the teacher, generally at the secondary and college level. However, chapters can be used by other educators, students, citizens, and policy makers to guide their own learning, adapt to their own purposes, and enable them to answer their own Earth system science questions based on valid scientific data. by drsinasoul May 27

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