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Web service

Web service
A Web service is a method of communications between two electronic devices over a network. It is a software function provided at a network address over the web with the service always on as in the concept of utility computing. The W3C defines a Web service as: a software system designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network. It has an interface described in a machine-processable format (specifically WSDL). Other systems interact with the Web service in a manner prescribed by its description using SOAP messages, typically conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization in conjunction with other Web-related standards.[1] The W3C also states: We can identify two major classes of Web services:REST-compliant Web services, in which the primary purpose of the service is to manipulate XML representations of Web resources using a uniform set of stateless operations; andArbitrary Web services, in which the service may expose an arbitrary set of operations.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_service

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Service-oriented architecture See also the client-server model, a progenitor concept A Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is a design pattern in which software/application components provide services to other software/application components via a protocol, typically over a network and in a loosely-coupled way. The principles of service-orientation are independent of any vendor, product or technology.[1] Comet (programming) Comet is a web application model in which a long-held HTTP request allows a web server to push data to a browser, without the browser explicitly requesting it.[1][2] Comet is an umbrella term, encompassing multiple techniques for achieving this interaction. All these methods rely on features included by default in browsers, such as JavaScript, rather than on non-default plugins. The Comet approach differs from the original model of the web, in which a browser requests a complete web page at a time.[3] The use of Comet techniques in web development predates the use of the word Comet as a neologism for the collective techniques. Comet is known by several other names, including Ajax Push,[4][5] Reverse Ajax,[6] Two-way-web,[7] HTTP Streaming,[7] and HTTP server push[8] among others.[9]

OGC Introduction OGC members are specifying interoperability interfaces and metadata encodings that enable real time integration of heterogeneous sensor webs into the information infrastructure. Developers will use these specifications in creating applications, platforms, and products involving Web-connected devices such as flood gauges, air pollution monitors, stress gauges on bridges, mobile heart monitors, Webcams, and robots as well as space and airborne earth imaging devices.

Understanding WSDL Aaron Skonnard Northface University October 2003 Applies to: Web Services Web Services Description Language (WSDL) 1.1 WS-I Basic Profile Version 1.0 XML Messaging XML Schema Summary: See the importance of WSDL in the overall Web services architecture, as it describes the complete contract for application communication. Service-level agreement A service-level agreement (SLA) is a part of a service contract[disambiguation needed] where a service is formally defined. In practice, the term SLA is sometimes used to refer to the contracted delivery time (of the service or performance). As an example, Internet service providers and telcos will commonly include service level agreements within the terms of their contracts with customers to define the level(s) of service being sold in plain language terms. In this case the SLA will typically have a technical definition in terms of mean time between failures (MTBF), mean time to repair or mean time to recovery (MTTR); various data rates; throughput; jitter; or similar measurable details. Overview[edit]

HTML WebSockets WebSocket is a protocol providing full-duplex communications channels over a single TCP connection. The WebSocket protocol was standardized by the IETF as RFC 6455 in 2011, and the WebSocket API in Web IDL is being standardized by the W3C. Technical overview[edit] Browser implementation[edit] Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) CoRE Working Group Z. Shelby Internet-Draft Sensinode Intended status: Standards Track K. Hartke Expires: December 30, 2013 C. Bormann Universitaet Bremen TZI June 28, 2013 Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) draft-ietf-core-coap-18 Abstract The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is a specialized web transfer protocol for use with constrained nodes and constrained (e.g., low-power, lossy) networks. The nodes often have 8-bit microcontrollers with small amounts of ROM and RAM, while constrained networks such as 6LoWPAN often have high packet error rates and a typical throughput of 10s of kbit/s.

WSDL Example Given below is a WSDL file that is provided to demonstrate a simple WSDL program. Let us assume the service provides a single publicly available function, called sayHello. This function expects a single string parameter and returns a single string greeting. For example, if you pass the parameter world then service function sayHello returns the greeting, "Hello, world!". Web Services Interoperability It is governed by a Board of Directors consisting of the founding members (IBM, Microsoft, BEA Systems, SAP, Oracle, Fujitsu, Hewlett-Packard, and Intel) and two elected members (currently, Sun Microsystems and webMethods). Since joining OASIS, other organizations have joined the WS-I technical committee including CA Technologies, JumpSoft and Booz Allen Hamilton. The organization's deliverables include profiles, sample applications that demonstrate the profiles' use, and test tools to help determine profile conformance. WS-I Profiles[edit] According to WS-I, a profile is

REST Representational State Transfer (REST) is a software architecture style consisting of guidelines and best practices for creating scalable web services.[1][2] REST is a coordinated set of constraints applied to the design of components in a distributed hypermedia system that can lead to a more performant and maintainable architecture.[3] REST has gained widespread acceptance across the Web[citation needed] as a simpler alternative to SOAP and WSDL-based Web services. RESTful systems typically, but not always, communicate over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol with the same HTTP verbs (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, etc.) used by web browsers to retrieve web pages and send data to remote servers.[3] The REST architectural style was developed by W3C Technical Architecture Group (TAG) in parallel with HTTP 1.1, based on the existing design of HTTP 1.0.[4] The World Wide Web represents the largest implementation of a system conforming to the REST architectural style. Architectural properties[edit]

RFC 6687: Performance Evaluation of (RPL) Independent Submission J. Tripathi, Ed. Request for Comments: 6687 J. de Oliveira, Ed. Category: Informational Drexel University ISSN: 2070-1721 JP. Vasseur, Ed. WSDL 2.0 - Web Service Description Language WSDL is short for Web Service Description Language. WSDL is used to describe the interface of a web service. If you do not know the interface of a web service, how could you call it? This WSDL tutorial is an introduction to WSDL 2.0. It will not cover each and every little detail of WSDL 2.0, but focus on the primary details. World Wide Web Consortium The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is the main international standards organization for the World Wide Web (abbreviated WWW or W3). Founded and currently led by Tim Berners-Lee,[3] the consortium is made up of member organizations which maintain full-time staff for the purpose of working together in the development of standards for the World Wide Web. As of 7 September 2013[update], the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has 383 members.[2] W3C also engages in education and outreach, develops software and serves as an open forum for discussion about the Web.

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