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The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon

The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon
You may have heard about Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon before. In fact, you probably learned about it for the first time very recently. If not, then you just might hear about it again very soon. Baader-Meinhof is the phenomenon where one happens upon some obscure piece of information—often an unfamiliar word or name—and soon afterwards encounters the same subject again, often repeatedly. Anytime the phrase “That’s so weird, I just heard about that the other day” would be appropriate, the utterer is hip-deep in Baader-Meinhof. Most people seem to have experienced the phenomenon at least a few times in their lives, and many people encounter it with such regularity that they anticipate it upon the introduction of new information. The phenomenon bears some similarity to synchronicity, which is the experience of having a highly meaningful coincidence, such as having someone telephone you while you are thinking about them. The reason for this is our brains’ prejudice towards patterns. Related:  PsychonauticaPsychoThought Patterns

100+ Documentaries To Expand Your Consciousness - Open Box Thinking - Open Box Thinking Free your mind & expand your awareness. Here is a list of over 100 documentaries you can watch for free online. They are about Science, Consciousness, ETs, you name it. It’s a smorgasbord of fascinating subjects to learn about. “If you find a video wrongly linked please let us know and we will find another to replace it. 1. This list will never be complete!

On Smell Smell is one of our primary and most immediate ways of understanding and interpreting the world and everything in it. We naturally categorise things into good and bad smells, and gravitate towards the former. Billion dollar industries exist around masking smells; making our environments and bodies smell better and less human. We often intuitively talk about smell as a shortcut to memory — with a certain, distinct scent being enough to remind us of of a certain time or place, often with great emotional intensity. Yet throughout history, smell has oftentimes been considered a lower sense, through which we can only access a baser reality. Plato renounced smell. Philosopher G.W. When the Black Death swept through Europe in the 14th century, understanding of the modern germ theory of disease eluded doctors. Enlightenment thinkers dismissed smell as irrational and unverifiable. But not all throughout history have rejected smell as low and base. “Not just smells.

How to find true friends (and love) in 45 minutes David Rowan Editor of Wired magazine This article was featured in Times Magazine, 5 November. There's a shorter version in the Ideas Bank section on the current Wired magazine. Can you make someone become intimately close to you -- even fall in love with you -- in less than an hour? Dr Aron -- known to friends as Art -- runs the Interpersonal Relationships Lab at Stony Brook University on the north shore of Long Island, east of New York City, and he has love on his mind. Back in 1997, Aron and colleagues published a paper in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin on "The Experimental Generation of Interpersonal Closeness". They arranged volunteers in pairs, and gave them a list of 36 questions that, one by one, they were both asked to answer openly over an hour "in a kind of sharing game". But would the "fast friends" experiment also work with more worldly senior executives and entrepreneurs?

Is slavery wrong? - Atheist Alliance International Recently a Muslim asked me, “Why is it bad to own slaves?” It’s a good question and it needs an answer. What religions tell us Both Christians and Muslims can answer this question from their holy scriptures, and both would find similar answers. The Bible, in the Old and New Testaments, permits slavery. God outlaws many things from having a tattoo to eating a pork sausage but he does not outlaw slavery. What reason tells us But atheists have no god to rely on and must use evidence and reason to arrive at a conclusion. Holding slaves is about how we treat fellow human beings so, by definition, it is a moral question. When you have a choice that affects another human, the moral act is one that reduces or prevents suffering or increases well-being. I would be the first to concede that moral decisions are not always clear-cut. Fortunately, we don’t have to worry too much about these intractable edge-cases because slavery does such gross damage to a person’s well-being that it is clearly wrong.

Transtheoretical model The transtheoretical model of behavior change assesses an individual's readiness to act on a new healthier behavior, and provides strategies, or processes of change to guide the individual through the stages of change to Action and Maintenance. The transtheoretical model is also known by the abbreviation "TTM"[1] and by the term "stages of change."[2][3] A popular book, Changing for Good,[4] and articles in the news media[5][6][7][8][9] have discussed the model. It is "arguably the dominant model of health behaviour change, having received unprecedented research attention, yet it has simultaneously attracted criticism. History and Core Constructs of the model[edit] James O. Prochaska and colleagues refined the model on the basis of research that they published in peer-reviewed journals and books.[13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26] The model consists of four "core constructs": "stages of change," "processes of change," "decisional balance," and "self-efficacy 1980s 1990s

Teleologic Evolution, Intelligent Self-Design, Anticipatory Computing, Local-Global Feedback Concurrent ontology and the extensional conception of attribute "By analogy with the extension of a type as the set of individuals of that type, we define the extension of an attribute as the set of states of an idealized observer of that attribute, observing concurrently with observers of other attributes. The attribute theoretic counterpart of an operation mapping individuals of one type to individuals of another is a dependency mapping states of one attribute to states of another. We integrate attributes with types via a symmetric but not self-dual framework of dipolar algebras or disheaves amounting to a type-theoretic notion of Chu space over a family of sets of qualia doubly indexed by type and attribute, for example the set of possible colors of a ball or heights of buildings. We extend the sheaf-theoretic basis for type theory to a notion of disheaf on a profunctor. Keywords: Attribute, Chu space, ontology, presheaf, type." "3.3 Ontology of properties and qualia (Notes:

Seekers Of The Lost Pieces – The Lacanian Review When I first saw the Kennedy assassination filmed by Zapruder, I thought that Jacqueline was trying to jump out of the limousine after the fatal shot. An understandable reaction of panic in someone who sees bullets impact on the one next to them. Later, White’s interview made me see better what the images showed. She did not jump out of the vehicle, but instead tried to retrieve a piece of her husband’s brain mass. Vain effort from the medical point of view, but not from the perspective of desire. Translated by Florencia F.C. Share This Story, Choose Your Platform!

The Lesson of the Monkeys | Jason Wells I was first told of this experiment* by a former work colleague, and later discovered this illustration of it. It’s both illuminating and disturbing. There is a clunky word that describes this phenomenon: filiopietism, or the reverence of forebears or tradition carried to excess. But I prefer another term for it: the tragic circle. I believe many of these tragic circles exist, mostly unseen, in across all cultures and societites, causing untold harm. The lesson is as obvious as it is important: question everything. * Stephenson, G.

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