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Good Enough Is Good Enough

Good Enough Is Good Enough
Published 19 March 2020 Philip Kerr has a message to all teachers who have made the transition from teaching in the classroom to online: If this is the end of the (teaching) week for you, well done – you’ve made it. I’ll keep this short! You may be busy… Switching classes to online In a language school that I work with, my colleagues have spent the last ten days frantically figuring out how to switch their classes online. I have to say that my colleagues have been doing an incredible job. Looking for practical help If you’re looking for practical help, keep following the posts here on the Supporting Every Teacher blog series. But, if I have one piece of advice, it is to try to keep things in perspective. It’s worth bearing in mind, too, what many of your students will be going through. But right now… The week is almost over and hoping that you don’t have to teach this weekend. If you would like to read more blog articles from the Supporting Every Teacher series, click here. But right now…

https://www.cambridge.org/elt/blog/2020/03/19/good-enough-is-good-enough/

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Ideas for adapting group lessons to working on Zoom As has happened in much of Europe, Poland has now closed schools, universities and other places where people might gather in the hope of reducing the spread of coronavirus. Our school had its last normal lessons on Wednesday, with Thursday and Friday dedicated to training our teachers how to use Zoom. We start teaching on Monday 16th, so my total experience with Zoom so far has been in the training process. However, I wanted to share what we’ve done and some of the ideas we’ve had for our adapting our standard EFL face-to-face lessons, in the hope that others will be able to build on this.

Using Class Dojo to reinforce positive behavior Class Dojo is a popular and somewhat controversial free tech tool for behavior management. I frequently hear it recommended by teachers at all grade levels, but am not familiar with it personally. So, I’ve invited a teacher who has used Class Dojo with her students to explain what’s worked for her. Teaching Your Adult English Class Online Published 19 March 2020 Our blog series continues to help English teachers move their classes online in view of many institutions being closed due to the Covid-19 virus. Today’s post is by Carol Rainbow, who offers suggestions for teaching your adult English class online. The virtual learning environment

Child protection The British Council builds connections, understanding and trust between people in the UK and other countries through arts and culture, education and the English language. We believe child protection requires everyone to take responsibility. We recognise that the care and welfare of children is paramount and that all children have the right to protection from all types of harm. Teaching Children Online Published 18 March 2020 Are you a primary English teacher who is about to teach online for the first time? Or, are you a primary teacher facing the dual challenge of teaching children online and preparing them for English exams? Or, maybe you already teach English online and are looking for extra ready-to-use ideas to engage and motivate children? David Valente shares advice on ways of teaching children online, keeping them engaged and focused on the task in hand.

Online safety for teenagers This lesson addresses the topic of online safety in a motivating way, allowing students to discuss issues, share their opinions and ideas and then do some online activities to finish the lesson or as a homework task. Aims: To develop students’ spoken fluency and use of modals for advice. To develop higher level critical thinking skills by ranking a series of tips in order of importance. To encourage students to think about the importance of online safety. Moving your classes online #2 Published 13 March 2020 This is a follow up post from Ceri Jones who continues to share advice on how teachers can feel prepared with teaching students and moving classes online. Ceri Jones is a teacher, trainer and materials writer based in Spain. She is part of the author team for our courses Eyes Open and Evolve as well as an online tutor for The Consultants-E.

The Adventures of Kara, Winston and the Smart crew - Childnet Our website, like most websites, uses cookies to distinguish you from other users. This helps us to improve your experience when you browse our website and also allows us to improve our site. By using cookies, the website is essentially able to ‘remember’ you during a single visit to the site, known as session cookie or for repeat visits, known as persistent cookies. Moving Your Classes Online #1 Published 13 March 2020 To help support all teachers who now have to teach from home due to the Coronavirus outbreak, we have created a series of blog posts with expert advice on how to move your classes online. To begin, here’s a message from Eric Baber, Director of Professional Learning and Development, introducing the blog series. Moving your classes online: getting started

Classroom Rules – Whole Brain Teaching Use the same approach for Rule 3 as you did for Rule 2. Rehearse the rule, “Raise your hand for permission to leave your seat” with the hand gesture; students raise their hands, then walk their fingers through the air. Then, use Wrong Way-Right Way. Reynaldo, on your cue, leaves his seat without permission. Video Conference Platform For Teaching Online Published 16 March 2020 Carol Rainbow is an online tutor for The Consultants-E. She has been a teacher for over 40 years and has been teaching online since 2008. Can we learn a second language like we learned our first? Robert William McCaul, winner (with Marek Kiczkowiak) of the TeachingEnglish blog award, examines the influential ideas of linguist Stephen Krashen, and the implications they have for the language classroom. If you've ever doubted whether you're a good language learner, then bear in mind that you've already learned one language very well indeed – your first. But this raises an interesting question: can adults learn a second language in the same way they learned their first as children? And if so, what are the implications for the classroom?

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