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Singaporeans are among the most stressed at work, globally

Singaporeans are among the most stressed at work, globally
Singaporeans are among the most stressed at work, globally, the 2019 Cigna 360 Well-Being Survey – Well and Beyond has revealed. In fact, of the five indices used to examine perceptions of well-being – family, financial, physical, work and social, work is a leading cause of rising stress levels in the country. Financial concerns and health concerns follow as the second and third respectively. More importantly, the ‘always on’ corporate culture that is prevalent in Singapore is another contributor of stress, particularly among women – 71% feel they work in such a culture, as compared to 66% of men. On this, April Chang, Chief Executive Officer, Cigna Singapore, said: “A busy work life, combined with an ‘always on’ culture, is impacting the physical and social well-being of Singaporeans. “The stigma of seeking help for mental well-being may also prevent many from pursuing professional help.” ALSO READ: Mental wellness at the workplace: It goes beyond the occasional day-off The global snapshot

https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/singaporeans-are-among-the-most-stressed-at-work-globally/

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Coping one day and crying the next: Work-related burnout is real SINGAPORE: One day at work, Ms Jamuna Raj was striking off “to-dos” from a neat hand-written list, thinking she had a lid on all her tasks at work. But the next day, she was bawling when her boss asked her if she was okay. The 31-year-old, who was handling multiple roles in client management, events, editorial management and production in a small publishing house, did not know what sparked it, but it was the start of her journey towards realising that she was experiencing burnout. “I was striking the to-dos off, but for every one that I did, there were five more. Still, because I was striking things out, I thought I could handle it,” she told CNA. Tips for Managing Stress in the Workplace Whatever your work demands, there are steps you can take to protect yourself from the damaging effects of stress, improve your job satisfaction, and bolster your well-being on and off the job. When is workplace stress too much? Stress isn’t always bad. A little bit of stress can help you stay focused, energetic, and able to meet new challenges in the workplace. It’s what keeps you on your toes during a presentation or alert to prevent accidents or costly mistakes. But in today’s hectic world, the workplace too often seems like an emotional roller coaster.

A whopping 92% of working Singaporeans are stressed – and women are prioritising families over themselves, study finds, Business Insider - Business Insider Singapore Pexels If you’re feeling stressed at work, you’re not alone. A vast majority of working Singaporeans are under stress, and women in particular feel that it’s less manageable, a survey has found. In the 2019 Cigna 360 Well-Being Survey, a whopping 92 per cent of working Singaporeans report feeling stressed, higher than the global average of 84 per cent. Of this, 13 per cent say their stress is unmanageable, which is on par with the global average, according to the study which surveyed a total of 13,200 online interviews in 23 markets, including 502 residents in Singapore. And stress doesn’t go undetected in the workplace.

Stress: Why does it happen and how can we manage it? Stress is a natural feeling of not being able to cope with specific demands and events. However, stress can become a chronic condition if a person does not take steps to manage it. These demands can come from work, relationships, financial pressures, and other situations, but anything that poses a real or perceived challenge or threat to a person’s well-being can cause stress. Stress can be a motivator, and it can even be essential to survival. The body’s fight-or-flight mechanism tells a person when and how to respond to danger.

Stress Facts, Statistics and Trends At times, stress is a helpful tool capable of boosting energy and attention. Most of the time, though, stress is a negative force in a person’s life that triggers a host of unwanted effects. Stress is a nearly universal human experience, so every person can benefit from learning about the condition. By understanding just how widespread and harmful stress is, a person can begin to take action against its effects. How Common Is Stress? Regardless of age, sex, ethnicity and religion, no one is immune to the burdens of stress.

Gender Inequality and Women in the Workplace Such inequality is hardly unique to the United States, however. In the following Q&A, Mary Brinton—sociology professor at Harvard University—answered a few questions about how the United States compares to other postindustrial countries on gender inequality, as well as how gender equality can help solve declining birth rates. It is important to incorporate men into the theoretical framework. Coping with stress at work Everyone who has ever held a job has, at some point, felt the pressure of work-related stress. Any job can have stressful elements, even if you love what you do. In the short-term, you may experience pressure to meet a deadline or to fulfill a challenging obligation. But when work stress becomes chronic, it can be overwhelming — and harmful to both physical and emotional health. Unfortunately, such long-term stress is all too common. In fact, APA’s annual Stress in Americauudyrvysezxwwadraactcaeby survey has consistently found that work is cited as a significant source of stress by a majority of Americans.

Singapore's most stressed out millennials on working long hours and dealing with anxiety at work I can't remember the last time I heard a young Singaporean say that they were genuinely excited about the prospect of getting into the office in the morning, even if they were deeply passionate about their field of work. Instead, often times, they expose a toxic work environment where stress and anxiety skyrocket while self-confidence plummets as a result of slave-driving superiors, a overwhelming workload, miserable working hours that extend far beyond the standard 9-to-5 with no reward, and even the possibility of retrenchment in the near future. If all the above sounds a little too dire to be true, you'll only need to look at the findings of the 2019 Cigna Well-Being Survey, which revealed a staggering 92 per cent of of working Singaporeans feel stressed in the workplace with debilitating effects such as lowered morale.

Workplace Stress - The American Institute of Stress Although the Institute is often asked to construct lists of the “most” and “least” stressful occupations, such rankings have little importance for several reasons. It is not the job but the person-environment fit that matters. Some individuals thrive in the time urgent pressure cooker of life in the fast lane, having to perform several duties at the same time and a list of things to do that would overwhelm most of us — provided they perceive that they are in control. They would be severely stressed by dull, dead-end assembly line work enjoyed by others who shun responsibility and simply want to perform a task that is well within their capabilities.

A Wife and Mother's Role - Focus on the Family It wasn’t until our second child was born that we realized the difference between raising her and raising our firstborn — our son with special needs. Yet no matter the roles and responsibilities a husband or wife takes, it often falls on a wife and mother to discern how to best support and nurture each relationship within the family. Two Roles – One Person

Burnout likely a common problem here, Singaporeans among most stressed at work globally SINGAPORE - When Ms Le Giang, 37, started a business selling Vietnamese street food in a kopitiam here nearly two years ago, she looked forward to being her own boss. The degree holder, who was previously a regional sales manager for a multinational firm, has since realised being her own boss is far from rosy. "It's extremely hard running it alone," she said. Some days, she relies on cups of coffee and cans of energy drink Red Bull to keep going. She has had to close the stall on a few occasions because she was too sick to work. "People don't understand that it's very stressful...

TODAYonline SINGAPORE — Miss Wee Sihui is only 22, but the former retail assistant, who started working full-time early this year, is suffering burnout from work and its accompanying symptoms of feeling constant exhaustion, negativity, dread and pessimism. She used to work in a popular confectionery store and when there was a manpower crunch, she spent around 13 hours on her feet from 9.30am to around 10.30pm daily, juggling responsibilities meant for at least two employees. But it wasn’t just the physically punishing work routine that made her quit her job. The mental stress, fuelled by a lack of support at work, led to anxiety attacks. Stress: Signs, Symptoms, Management & Prevention What is stress? Stress is the body's reaction to any change that requires an adjustment or response. The body reacts to these changes with physical, mental, and emotional responses. Stress is a normal part of life.

The Economics of Happiness When I was 21, I told my father that I didn’t want to work with him any longer at the ice cream company he co-founded, Baskin-Robbins, and I didn’t want to depend on his financial achievements. I did not want to have a trust fund or any other access to or dependence on his money. I wanted to discover and live my own values, and I knew that I wasn’t strong enough to do that if I remained tethered, even a little, to my father’s fortune. I left Baskin-Robbins and the money my father had made selling ice cream because I didn’t want to live a life of affluence based on a product that could harm people’s health.

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