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Thousands of Plastic Figures Hold Up the Floor

Thousands of Plastic Figures Hold Up the Floor
One of the most exciting contemporary artists of our time, Korean Do Ho Suh, created this large sculptural installation that doesn't look like much until you come closer. Glass plates rest on thousands of multicolored miniature plastic figures who are crowded together with their heads and arms turned skyward. Together, they are holding the weight of the individual visitor who steps onto the floor. Currently showing at Lehmann Maupin's pop-up gallery at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute (STPI), Floor is one of those installations that's wonderfully thought-provoking. This installation can be seen, alongside works by artists Teresita Fernández, Ashley Bickerton, and Lee Bui, from now till February 11, 2012. DO HO SUH Floor, 1997-2000 Installation at Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York PVC Figures, Glass Plates, Phenolic Sheets, Polyurethane Resin 40 parts each: 39.37 x 39.37 x 3.15 inches 100 x 100 x 8 cm Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York Lehmann Maupin Gallery website Related:  Sculptures & Figures

Broken CDs Transformed Into Iridescent Animal Sculptures With most of our music now in a digital format, neatly contained on our mobile phones and iPods, many of us have no doubt got lots of old CDs stacked up in garages, waiting to become miniature frisbees or coffee coasters or museum relics from a bygone era. But rather than letting them lie there in their boxes, unloved and gathering dust, why not put them to good use by smashing them up and turning them into attractive animal sculptures? Artist Sean Avery has done exactly that and created a series of sculptures—from bears to peregrine falcons and even the Loch Ness monster—using the reflective splinters of what was once, possibly, a cherished music collection. It’s not the first time we’ve seen artworks created from dead (well, dead-ish) media. This last one’s a dragon made from circuit boards and old CDs [via Colossal]

serge salat: beyond infinity immersive installation sep 16, 2011 serge salat: beyond infinity immersive installation ‘beyond infinity’, an immersive installation by french artist and theorist serge salat ‘beyond infinity’, a multisensory installation by french artist and theorist serge salat, interweaves mirrors, light, music, and fractal art in an architecture that conflates visitors’ perceptions of space. sponsored by buick cars and usable during the events as a vehicle showroom, the work is installed at shanghai’s westgate mall from september 16th through 18th, 2011. measuring 12.45 by 10.8 meters at a height of 3.8 meters, the structure is completely closed, composed of a steel infrastructure with honeycomb aluminum panels covered in mirrors. view looking into the third ‘room’ in the sequence: the circular and triangular infinite staircases the ‘infinite fault’ when exiting from the red grid the ‘hyper cross’, the fifth ‘room’ architectural plan process photograph: assembling the staircases video tour through the space

takashi murakami at versailles sep 20, 2010 takashi murakami at versailles ‘oval buddha’ by takashi murakami, 2007-2010 (bronze and gold leaf) ©2007-2010 takashi murakami/kaikai kiki co., ltd. all rights reserved. photo: cedric delsaux – water parterre / château de versailles the château de versailles is the location of the latest exhibition by japanese artist takashi murakami. the show is titled ‘murakami versailles’ and features a number of manga-inspired sculptures displayed both indoors and out at the historic french palace. of the 22 works on display, 11 were created specifically for this show. all the murakami works sit within the context of the palace, often contrasting sharply with the period décor and complimenting it at other times. the show will run from now till december 12th as part of the regular versailles admission. nate archer I designboom

Sculptures Popping Out of Paintings Oh, to have been in Tokyo in June! Shintaro Ohata just finished up a solo exhibition at the Yukari Art Contemprary in Tokyo, Japan. This Hiroshima, Japan-born artist is known for his ability to show us everyday life in a cinematic way. He captures light in his paintings, showering the world, as we know it, with carefully placed strokes of it. "Every ordinary scenery in our daily lives, such as the rising sun, the beauty of a sunset or a glittering road paved with asphalt on a rainy night, becomes something irreplaceable if we think we wouldn’t be able to see them anymore," he told Yukari gallery. More than that, this artist has a unique style. Straight from the Yukari gallery, here's a sample of his stellar work. ' Photos courtesy of Yukari Art Contemporary.

Wire Sculpture Coup de coeur pour les étonnants travaux de l’artiste Gavin Worth avec ces différentes sculptures en fil de fer. Actuellement basé à San Francisco, il conçoit à partir de 2 mètres de fil des oeuvres et des profils de personnages. A découvrir sur son portfolio et dans la suite de l’article.

Staring Cats Light Sculpture is Fixating Need Help? Staring Cats Light Sculpture Is Fixating - Core77 Curated by Nuttawat Sujarit Related PostsMore Posts by This Curator Michael Sporn Animation Jellyfish-like Bowls Photos: Gülnur Özdağlar Plastic bottles -- that environmental bane of a disposable, modern society -- can be both an abundant form of pollution in waterways and oceans, as well as a materials source for mind-boggling art. In the skillful hands of Turkish architect and upcycling designer Gülnur Özdağlar the unremarkable PET plastic bottle is transformed into gorgeously diaphanous and functional objects like bowls and jewelry. Using simple tools like a candle, scissors and a soldering iron, Özdağlar upcycles bottles into a bewildering range of ephemeral accessories that under the light, look like fantastical, tentacled sea creatures or little undersea treasures. ... to this: That's pretty neat! Alchemy of upcyclingAs TreeHugger Lloyd has mentioned before about how 'redesign', not recycling, will be the wave of the future, Özdağlar asserts that large-scale recycling is not the solution, rather ... the real solution is "upcycling" rather than plain recycling.

Skateboard Sculpture Now that’s a sick madness! If you have never heard about Japanese wood sculptor named Haroshi, go get the wind of his most original conceptual art. As a creator of amazingly beautiful wooden sculptures out of old, crashed and broken skateboard decks, Haroshi passed for a man of considerable resourcefulness. His multicolored and meticulously sculpted art pieces simply astound with lifelike affinity, so in whichever way it’s even possible to mistake them for being real! In his works he stacks many layers with all piece elements being connected either in their original form or in shapes to form wooden mosaic, dots, and pixels. Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source Source

Recycled Newspaper Creatures Appear All Over Tucson Photograph: Nick Georgiou At first glance, this sculpture might pass for a dog, but look again and you’ll notice that despite having a curiously affecting expression, its eyes aren’t moving and its fur is made out of recycled newspaper. The Gloamer. Photograph: Nick Georgiou This is "The Gloamer," one of urban sculptor Nick Georgiou’s newspaper sculptures, which he poses on the street before photographing people’s reactions to them. Speaking to Helen Soteriou, he explained: “I get a lot of double takes, some people stopping me even before I position the piece. Sculpture alongside a Banksy. Georgiou likes the spontaneity of the street, abandoning the sacrosanct boundaries of the gallery — you can’t predict how the environment will change, and you can’t predict how the public will interact with the sculpture, adding a whole new active personality to the artwork. All this unwanted paper is symptomatic of a larger issue — the decline of the press — which is one of Georgiou’s key themes.

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