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Thousands of Plastic Figures Hold Up the Floor

Thousands of Plastic Figures Hold Up the Floor
One of the most exciting contemporary artists of our time, Korean Do Ho Suh, created this large sculptural installation that doesn't look like much until you come closer. Glass plates rest on thousands of multicolored miniature plastic figures who are crowded together with their heads and arms turned skyward. Together, they are holding the weight of the individual visitor who steps onto the floor. Currently showing at Lehmann Maupin's pop-up gallery at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute (STPI), Floor is one of those installations that's wonderfully thought-provoking. This installation can be seen, alongside works by artists Teresita Fernández, Ashley Bickerton, and Lee Bui, from now till February 11, 2012. DO HO SUH Floor, 1997-2000 Installation at Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York PVC Figures, Glass Plates, Phenolic Sheets, Polyurethane Resin 40 parts each: 39.37 x 39.37 x 3.15 inches 100 x 100 x 8 cm Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York Lehmann Maupin Gallery website Related:  Sculptures & FiguresSculpture

Broken CDs Transformed Into Iridescent Animal Sculptures With most of our music now in a digital format, neatly contained on our mobile phones and iPods, many of us have no doubt got lots of old CDs stacked up in garages, waiting to become miniature frisbees or coffee coasters or museum relics from a bygone era. But rather than letting them lie there in their boxes, unloved and gathering dust, why not put them to good use by smashing them up and turning them into attractive animal sculptures? Artist Sean Avery has done exactly that and created a series of sculptures—from bears to peregrine falcons and even the Loch Ness monster—using the reflective splinters of what was once, possibly, a cherished music collection. It’s not the first time we’ve seen artworks created from dead (well, dead-ish) media. This last one’s a dragon made from circuit boards and old CDs [via Colossal]

Sunken bridge-Agency Art Animation A series of moats and fortresses were built over the West Brabant Water Line region of the Netherlands during the 17th century in order to provide protection from invasion by France and Spain. Fort de Roovere was surrounded with a shallow moat that was too deep to march across, and too shallow for boats. In turn the earthen fort had remained protected –until now. The bridge and its components have been made from sustainable hardwood that has also been treated with a non-toxic coating protecting it from fungal decay and increasing its durability… Just a little wave and you won’t be so amazed anymore! Very nice and beautiful concept still. Via – Inhabitat Related Photos No related photos. Related Posts Popular Posts Sorry.

serge salat: beyond infinity immersive installation sep 16, 2011 serge salat: beyond infinity immersive installation ‘beyond infinity’, an immersive installation by french artist and theorist serge salat ‘beyond infinity’, a multisensory installation by french artist and theorist serge salat, interweaves mirrors, light, music, and fractal art in an architecture that conflates visitors’ perceptions of space. sponsored by buick cars and usable during the events as a vehicle showroom, the work is installed at shanghai’s westgate mall from september 16th through 18th, 2011. measuring 12.45 by 10.8 meters at a height of 3.8 meters, the structure is completely closed, composed of a steel infrastructure with honeycomb aluminum panels covered in mirrors. view looking into the third ‘room’ in the sequence: the circular and triangular infinite staircases the ‘infinite fault’ when exiting from the red grid the ‘hyper cross’, the fifth ‘room’ architectural plan process photograph: assembling the staircases video tour through the space

82 Clever and Creative Fred & Friends Products I'm sure you've come across Fred & Friend products before at your local indie store and might not have even known it. Last weekend I was cruising around town and stopped at an indie store only to find one whole corner of the place dedicated to Fred & Friend products. It was heavenly. I stood there for probably more than a half hour laughing and checking out all their cool stuff. A lot of creativity goes into the making of these products, and I think part of that cleverness is shown in the name of the product and the slogan. Which one's your favorite? Disclaimer: the images you're about to view may not be suitable for all audiences. the OH! conversational paperclips the hot buttered desk accessory! there’s no esc for flies! bigger, better, louder, cooler who says dusting can’t be fun? we ALL need a foot in the door rude, chewed refrigerator magnets street style for your home race you home they really make an entrance< another bright idea from Mr. matryoshkas made to measure a handy little spatula

takashi murakami at versailles sep 20, 2010 takashi murakami at versailles ‘oval buddha’ by takashi murakami, 2007-2010 (bronze and gold leaf) ©2007-2010 takashi murakami/kaikai kiki co., ltd. all rights reserved. photo: cedric delsaux – water parterre / château de versailles the château de versailles is the location of the latest exhibition by japanese artist takashi murakami. the show is titled ‘murakami versailles’ and features a number of manga-inspired sculptures displayed both indoors and out at the historic french palace. of the 22 works on display, 11 were created specifically for this show. all the murakami works sit within the context of the palace, often contrasting sharply with the period décor and complimenting it at other times. the show will run from now till december 12th as part of the regular versailles admission. nate archer I designboom

Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee (click images for detail) For the better part of three decades multidisciplinary artist Guy Laramee has worked as a stage writer, director, composer, a fabricator of musical instruments, a singer, sculptor, painter and writer. Among his sculptural works are two incredible series of carved book landscapes and structures entitled Biblios and The Great Wall, where the dense pages of old books are excavated to reveal serene mountains, plateaus, and ancient structures. Of these works he says: So I carve landscapes out of books and I paint Romantic landscapes. Laramee’s next show will be in April of 2012 at the Galerie d’Art d’Outremont in Montreal.

Sculptures Popping Out of Paintings Oh, to have been in Tokyo in June! Shintaro Ohata just finished up a solo exhibition at the Yukari Art Contemprary in Tokyo, Japan. This Hiroshima, Japan-born artist is known for his ability to show us everyday life in a cinematic way. He captures light in his paintings, showering the world, as we know it, with carefully placed strokes of it. "Every ordinary scenery in our daily lives, such as the rising sun, the beauty of a sunset or a glittering road paved with asphalt on a rainy night, becomes something irreplaceable if we think we wouldn’t be able to see them anymore," he told Yukari gallery. More than that, this artist has a unique style. Straight from the Yukari gallery, here's a sample of his stellar work. ' Photos courtesy of Yukari Art Contemporary.

Yuki Matsueda ‘While most designers are busying adding more and more elements into their artworks, Japan-based Yuki Matsueda has, however, managed to let some elements escape from his art pieces. The result seems quite amazing… A vivid 3D image is successfully created and all the elements are believed to be more shocking than those stay still on paper.’

Wire Sculpture Coup de coeur pour les étonnants travaux de l’artiste Gavin Worth avec ces différentes sculptures en fil de fer. Actuellement basé à San Francisco, il conçoit à partir de 2 mètres de fil des oeuvres et des profils de personnages. A découvrir sur son portfolio et dans la suite de l’article.

Ephemeral Portraits Cut from Layers of Wire Mesh by Seung Mo Park Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh. Each piece is several inches thick as each plane that forms the final image is spaced a few finger widths apart, giving the portraits a certain depth and dimensionality that’s hard to convey in a photograph, but this video on YouTube shows it pretty well.

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