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Grow Your Own Chocolate

Grow Your Own Chocolate
By Mindy McIntosh-Shetter Around Valentine’s Day the worry of what to give that special person is throbbing in ones head. A nice dinner is always a great start to that special day dedicated to couples. Commercials show giving diamonds as a way of expressing ones love but I have another way that may take time but shows true commitment, love, and can address those cravings that we all have had some time in our lives. One may ask what could that be. Well the answer can be found in the candy aisle and it is . . . chocolate. Growing your own hyper-local chocolate is one way of showing how much you care for an individual. Chocolate mint is one plant that any individual can grow that smells and tastes like the name states, chocolate mint. The cocoa plant is a challenge to grow for even the seasoned gardener. To start this project of love, either purchase cocoa plants from a reputable tropical plant dealer or start with the beans. Move the tree to a warm room away from direct sunlight.

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