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Rune Meanings - The Elder Futhark

Rune Meanings - The Elder Futhark
I work with the "Elder Futhark", the runic alphabet which is a composite of the runic symbols most commonly used in northern Europe. The names of the runes of the Elder Futhark are speculative recreations of what linguists call "proto-Germanic", which stems from "proto-Indo-European". There are many versions of the runic alphabets. Each has variations in names, shapes, esoteric meanings and magical uses. One should not mix futharks, or the intent or meaning becomes confused. The Elder Futhark, the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc, and the Younger (or Scandinavian) Futhark are the most frequently seen versions of the runic alphabets in use today. The runes are broken into three sections or groups of eight, called aett (aettir, plural). First the rune name is given, then its phonetic value, its symbolic image, and finally the esoteric meaning used in divination. Fehu(F: Domestic cattle, wealth.) Uruz: (U: Auroch, a wild ox.) Thurisaz: (TH: Thorn or a Giant.) Ansuz: (A: The As, ancestral god, i.e.

http://www.sunnyway.com/runes/meanings.html

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Runes the origins of Runes The middle-eastern biblical description of the phonic alphabet's (Phoenecian root) division into the many spoken language-branches of the Semitic middle-eastern language family-tree describes it as having originally occured shortly after the world-flood that destroyed Atlantis (called, in Genesis, the city of Enoch), at the beginning of the Babylonian Empire from the unification of northern Akkad and southern Sumer between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. In Genesis we are told of the building of the Tower of Babel, and of the subsequent "confusion of the tongues." This mythology establishes the division of the alphabet into languages to the east of Babylon, with the 50 letters of Indus Sanskrit, and to the west with the 27 "monoliteral" Hieroglyphics of Egypt as having derived from the 36 letters of pre-Babylonian "Ugaritic" cuneiform, the earliest known ante-deluvial alphabets known of including "linear-A" and "-B."

Ishtar Ishtar (pronounced /ˈɪʃtɑːr/; Transliteration: DIŠTAR; Akkadian: 𒀭𒈹 ; Sumerian 𒀭𒌋𒁯) is the East Semitic Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex.[1] She is the counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna, and is the cognate for the Northwest Semitic Aramean goddess Astarte. Characteristics[edit] Ishtar was the goddess of love, war, fertility, and sexuality. Ishtar was the daughter of Ninurta.[2] She was particularly worshipped in northern Mesopotamia, at the Assyrian cities of Nineveh, Ashur and Arbela (Erbil).[2]

Runic magic In medieval sources, notably the Poetic Edda, the Sigrdrífumál mentions "victory runes" to be carved on a sword, "some on the grasp and some on the inlay, and name Tyr twice." In early modern and modern times, related folklore and superstition is recorded in the form of the Icelandic magical staves. In the early 20th century, Germanic mysticism coins new forms of "runic magic", some of which were continued or developed further by contemporary adherents of Germanic Neopaganism. Modern systems of runic divination are based on Hermeticism, classical Occultism, and the I Ching. Historical evidence[edit] Tacitus[edit]

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré Grew Up on the Plains of Namibia What you see below isn’t child abuse. It’s actually an amazing once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that two parents blessed their young daughter with. The girl in these pictures is Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré. Kāla (time) Head of Kala carved on top of Kidal temple portal, East Java. Kālá (Sanskrit: काल, IPA: [kɑːˈlə]) is a Sanskrit word which means "Time".[1] It is also the name of a deity in which sense it is not always distinguishable from kāla meaning "black". It often used as one of the various names or forms of Yama. Monier-Williams's widely used Sanskrit-English dictionary[2] lists two distinct words with the form kāla.

Runic alphabets / Runes / Futhark Little is known about the origins of the Runic alphabet, which is traditionally known as futhark after the first six letters. In Old Norse the word rune means 'letter', 'text' or 'inscription'. The word also means 'mystery' or 'secret' in Old Germanic languages and runes had a important role in ritual and magic. Here are some theories about the origins of runes: The alphabet was probably created independently rather than evolving from another alphabet.

Amazing Photo Manipulation by Photographer Erik Johansson Swedish photographer and retouch artist Erik Johansson has one of the craziest photography portfolios we’ve ever seen. Erik is completely self-taught in retouching his own photographs to make impossible and extraordinary images. He says his inspiration came from both growing up with a grandmother who painted and having a penchant for escaping into the other worlds of video games, so he naturally blended the two into a technique using computers to generate images that couldn’t be captured by a camera. Ori (Yoruba) Ori is a metaphysical concept important to Yoruba spirituality and philosophy. Ori, literally meaning "head," refers to one's spiritual intuition and destiny. It is the reflective spark of human consciousness embedded into the human essence, and therefore is often personified as an Orisha in its own right . In Yoruba tradition, it is believed that human beings are able to heal themselves both spiritually and physically by working with the Orishas to achieve a balanced character, or iwa-pele.

A Few Words About Edred Thorsson... There are as many opinions about Edred Thorsson as there are readers of his books, and there are plenty of those. Rather than take up space in the reading list proper presenting these diverse and often conflicting viewpoints, I thought it best to banish the debate to it's own page. There is no doubt that Edred Thorsson is one of the most prolific and widely-read authors on the subject of the runes. Thorsson is one of the few authors you will find listed in both the academic and mystical sections of this bibliography - his academic books are written under his real name, Stephen E.

Astaxanthin Astaxanthin /æstəˈzænθɨn/ is a carotenoid. It belongs to a larger class of phytochemicals known as terpenes, which are built from five carbon precursors; isopentenyl diphosphate (or IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (or DMAPP). Astaxanthin is classified as a xanthophyll (originally derived from a word meaning "yellow leaves" since yellow plant leaf pigments were the first recognized of the xanthophyll family of carotenoids), but currently employed to describe carotenoid compounds that have oxygen-containing moities, hydroxyl (-OH) or ketone (C=O), such as zeaxanthin and canthaxanthin. Indeed, astaxanthin is a metabolite of zeaxanthin and/or canthaxanthin, containing both hydroxyl and ketone functional groups. Like many carotenoids, astaxanthin is a colorful, lipid-soluble pigment.

Baal Bronze figurine of a Baal, ca. 14th–12th century BC, found at Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit) near the Phoenician coast. Musée du Louvre. "Baal" may refer to any god and even to human officials. In some texts it is used for Hadad, a god of thunderstorms, fertility and agriculture, and the lord of Heaven. Since only priests were allowed to utter his divine name, Hadad, Ba‛al was commonly used. Stephen Flowers Stephen Edred Flowers (born May 5, 1953), commonly known as Stephen E. Flowers, and also by the pen-names Edred Thorsson, and Darban-i-Den, is a former American professor, scholar, runologist, runosophist, goði[1][2] and proponent of occultism, Odianism, esoteric runosophy, Germanic mysticism, Asatru, and Mazdaism, being instrumental in the early establishment of the Germanic Neopagan movement in North America and has also been very active in Left-Hand Path occult organizations. He has over three dozen published books and hundreds of published papers and translations on a disparate range of subjects.

What a Shaman See’s In a Mental Hospital 77.4k Shares The Shamanic View of Mental Illness In the shamanic view, mental illness signals “the birth of a healer,” explains Malidoma Patrice Somé. Thus, mental disorders are spiritual emergencies, spiritual crises, and need to be regarded as such to aid the healer in being born. What those in the West view as mental illness, the Dagara people regard as “good news from the other world.”

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