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Poems for kids

Related:  English in early childhoodLEARNIGN ENGLISH AND EVERYTHINGEnglish Teaching - Early yearssuranileanne2278

Music and Movement Activities for Toddlers and Preschoolers How to teach children English using illustrated storybooks What makes illustrated storybooks such a good resource for teaching young learners of English? The British Council’s Gail Ellis, co-author of a storytelling handbook for primary English language teachers, explains. Listen to an interview with Gail in our podcast and register for her webinar taking place on Thursday, 2 October. Illustrated storybooks provide an ideal resource for helping children learn English. This is because children love listening to stories. Storybooks present language in familiar and memorable contexts, and high quality illustrations help children understand as they match what they hear to what they see. Why use storybooks in the classroom? Teachers can use storybooks to complement an English language course or as the main teaching resource. Storybooks can meet a variety of learner needs Selecting the right storybook The key to successful storytelling is having the right story for the linguistic and cognitive ability of the children. Discovering new storybooks

50+ Quick & Easy Kids Crafts that ANYONE Can Make! These 50+ quick and easy kids crafts can be made in under 30 minutes using items that you probably already have around the house! No special tools or skills are required, so ANYONE can make these cute crafts for kids! Great fun for the entire family! 50+ Quick & Easy Kids Crafts One of the #1 things that people often say to me is, “I would love to make creative projects with my kids, but I’m just not crafty. Why Craft with Your Kids? A recent study by Dr. Other key findings of Dr. • Arts and crafts engage multiple brain areas simultaneously and improve bilateral coordination between the left and right sides of the brain, leading to immediate and future cognitive development. • Activities like arts and crafts accelerate the development of muscles in the hands and fingers, improving fine motor skills that are essential for school success in the earliest formal years. • Face-to-face interaction in the early years is critical for optimal social development. emotions. lasting memories.

Whole Child Development Is Undervalued The question is how to make such an approach both systemic and sustainable. Whole Person Socio-emotional, physical, creative, and cognitive capacities are deeply intertwined and equally important in ensuring a child's wellbeing, learning, and growth. (That shouldn't be a surprise to anyone studying or supporting children's learning.) Nobel laureate James Heckman, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, has shown that the non-cognitive skills emerging in early childhood are among the strongest predictors of adult outcomes. And Paul Tough, author of How Children Succeed, has continued to emphasize the crucial role that soft skills play in character formation and building on persistence, curiosity, and even grit -- the "passion and perseverance for very long-term goals," according to psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth. The most impactful way of supporting such skills is associated with helping children feel in control of their learning process. Whole Communities Whole Societies

Integrating ICT self-study booklet It forms part of a series of self-study booklets, in which teachers will find useful theory and practice for teaching English effectively, including short case studies and professional development activities to do individually and with colleagues. Featuring a range of engaging and accessible activities, the booklets help teachers to: identify areas for development find a variety of ways to improve their teaching knowledge develop the skills they need in and out of the classroom. Teacher educators can make use of these materials to work with developing teachers to help assess and address their learning needs. Each booklet covers one of the professional practices in the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Framework for teachers and is based on research into what effective professional development involves. In this booklet, you will look at: The publications are free to download in pdf format Featuring a range of engaging and accessible activities, the booklets help teachers to:

The Art of Control Executive function — our ability to remember and use what we know, defeat our unproductive impulses, and switch gears and adjust to new demands — is increasingly understood as a key element not just of learning but of lifelong success. Researchers at the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University describe executive function as an air traffic control system for the mind — helping us manage streams of information, revise plans, stay organized, filter out distractions, cope with stress, and make healthy decisions. Children learn these skills first from their parents, through reliable routines, meaningful and responsive interactions, and play that focuses attention and stirs the beginnings of self-control. But when home is not stable, or in situations of neglect or abuse, executive function skills may be impaired, or may not develop at all, limiting a child’s success in elementary school and later life. Imaginary Play Support it by: Storytelling “Children love to tell stories.

How to help your child learn English with YouTube videos Tracey Chapelton, education consultant and materials writer, has some advice for parents of young English learners, whose home language might not be English. To learn a language we need a lot of exposure to it. YouTube is beneficial if you are not a fluent English speaker, and want a more fluent model of English for your child. Repetition is also important for language learning. It helps us remember important words and expressions. The more they watch, the more they will understand, eventually using the language themselves. Where to start? There are lots of great cartoons and songs available on YouTube for young children. Start by watching your child’s favourite programme on YouTube, but in English. The language is designed for children who may be hearing English for the first time. Show interest while watching Many parents worry about their children having too much screen time. One way around this is to watch the programme along with your child. We’ve got a beach ball too!

What to consider when teaching English in large classes How many students do you teach? Do you feel that your classes are too big? Author and education consultant Jason Anderson looks at the issues and offers some potential solutions. For many of us, our classes are larger than we would like them to be. They can present a number of challenges that teachers of smaller classes are less likely to face. But what exactly do we mean by large classes? Definitions of a large class What we label a ‘large class’ depends mostly on context and expectations. In this article, we will take the midpoint between these two figures. Where teachers work in large classes today Perhaps the two continents where teachers most commonly work in large classes are Africa (especially sub-Saharan Africa) and Asia (especially the Indian sub-continent and China). This is not a uniform picture. Large classes are not unique to low-income countries. The challenges of working in large classes We can divide the challenges into two general areas: 1. 2. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2.

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