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The destruction of the Earth is a crime. It should be prosecuted

The destruction of the Earth is a crime. It should be prosecuted
Why do we wait until someone has passed away before we honour them? I believe we should overcome our embarrassment, and say it while they are with us. In this spirit, I want to tell you about the world-changing work of Polly Higgins. She is a barrister who has devoted her life to creating an international crime of ecocide. This means serious damage to, or destruction of, the natural world and the Earth’s systems. It would make the people who commission it – such as chief executives and government ministers – criminally liable for the harm they do to others, while creating a legal duty of care for life on Earth. I believe it would change everything. There are no effective safeguards preventing a few powerful people, companies or states from wreaking havoc for the sake of profit or power. Hundreds of dead dolphins are washing up on French beaches, often with horrendous injuries. When governments collaborate (as in all these cases they do), how can such atrocities be prevented?

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/mar/28/destruction-earth-crime-polly-higgins-ecocide-george-monbiot

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