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How Humans Could Halt Climate Change By 2050 : Goats and Soda : NPR

How Humans Could Halt Climate Change By 2050 : Goats and Soda : NPR

https://choice.npr.org/index.html?origin=https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2019/03/11/688876374/its-2050-and-this-is-how-we-stopped-climate-change

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People who think their opinions are superior to others are most prone to overestimating their relevant knowledge and ignoring chances to learn more By guest blogger Tom Stafford We all know someone who is convinced their opinion is better than everyone else’s on a topic – perhaps, even, that it is the only correct opinion to have. Maybe, on some topics, you are that person. Google Just Gave 2 Billion Chrome Users A Reason To Switch To Firefox Berlin, Germany - February 26: In this photo illustration the app of Google Chrome is displayed on a smartphone on February 26, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo Illustration by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images) Getty Google is planning to restrict modern ad blocking Chrome extensions to enterprise users only, according to 9to5Google.

Regenerative agriculture can make farmers stewards of the land again For years, “sustainable” has been the buzzword in conversations about agriculture. If farmers and ranchers could slow or stop further damage to land and water, the thinking went, that was good enough. I thought that way too, until I started writing my new book, “One Size Fits None: A Farm Girl’s Search for the Promise of Regenerative Agriculture.” I grew up on a cattle ranch in western South Dakota and once worked as an agricultural journalist. For me, agriculture is more than a topic – it is who I am.

Norway is starting the world's biggest divestment in oil and gas Kristian Helgesen/Bloomberg via Getty Images By Adam Vaughan Norway has said its $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund, the world’s biggest, should sell stocks in oil and gas exploration companies, in a move that is the biggest divestment from hydrocarbons yet. The Government Pension Fund Global, which was built off Norway’s oil revenues, should begin phasing out $8 billion held in 134 firms to reduce the fund’s risk from volatile oil prices, the country’s finance ministry said in a statement on 8 March. But in a major concession, the withdrawal won’t apply to Shell, BP and France’s Total, the three biggest investments in the fund’s total £27.9bn of oil and gas stocks, because they aren’t solely oil production companies.

The Prescription Drug Landscape, Explored Overview Americans spend more on prescription medications each year than the citizens of any other country. Measuring drug spending remains a challenge, however, because of limited public data on how much the various payers and supply chain intermediaries pay for prescription drugs. Several public and private organizations have recently published U.S. drug spending estimates using different methodologies. These estimates differ, but an analysis from The Pew Charitable Trusts indicates that spending on prescription drugs has increased in recent years. The federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) estimates that total retail prescription drug spending rose 26.8 percent between 2012 and 2016—a faster rate of growth than all other categories of personal health care expenditures.

Images of Melt: Earth's Vanishing Ice Midnight Iceberg The midnight sun glows off an iceberg in Disko Bay, Greenland. Icebergs calving into the sea are a major source of Greenland's ice loss. Meltwater Stream A stream of meltwater flows across the ice surface in Greenland. 'I've paid a huge personal cost:' Google walkout organizer resigns over alleged retaliation A prominent internal organizer against Google’s handling of sexual harassment cases has resigned from the company, alleging she was the target of a campaign of retaliation designed to intimidate and dissuade other employees from speaking out about workplace issues. Claire Stapleton, a longtime marketing manager at Google and its subsidiary YouTube, said she decided to leave the company after 12 years when it became clear that her trajectory at the company was “effectively over”. “I made the choice after the heads of my department branded me with a kind of scarlet letter that makes it difficult to do my job or find another one,” she wrote in an email to co-workers announcing her departure on 31 May. “If I stayed, I didn’t just worry that there’d be more public flogging, shunning, and stress, I expected it.” “The message that was sent [to others] was: ‘You’re going to compromise your career if you make the same choices that Claire made,” she told the Guardian by phone.

How Bill Gates-backed vegan Beyond Meat is winning over meat-eaters Whatever your burger pleasure, targeting meat-eaters is a smart move — there are way more of them than there are vegans and vegetarians. Only 5 percent of Americans identify as vegetarian and 3 percent vegan, according to a 2017 Gallup poll. Those numbers haven't changed much in the last decade or so. Republicans are accidentally doing more to advance progressive values than Democrats Something strange and unfamiliar has taken root in Washington, DC these past few days. In between segments about Donald Trump’s latest impeachable offense, Republican intransigence in the face of a cataclysmic government shutdown, and whatever other mundanity du jour is on the docket, cable news shows have carved out time to talk about honest-to-God policy proposals. Specifically, we find ourselves amidst a nationwide conversation about, of all things, marginal tax rates. How we got here is clear: a rising star of the Democratic Party has sought to introduce herself to the American people by extolling the virtues of making the wealthiest among them pay their fair share for the good of the country. And yes, Rep.

Octopuses May Go Blind As Climate Change Sucks Oxygen Out of the Ocean Editor's Note: This story was updated at 11:20 a.m. E.D.T. on Friday, May 17 Turning light particles into visual information is hard work, and your body relies on oxygen to get the job done. A quantum experiment suggests there’s no such thing as objective reality Back in 1961, the Nobel Prize–winning physicist Eugene Wigner outlined a thought experiment that demonstrated one of the lesser-known paradoxes of quantum mechanics. The experiment shows how the strange nature of the universe allows two observers—say, Wigner and Wigner’s friend—to experience different realities. Since then, physicists have used the “Wigner’s Friend” thought experiment to explore the nature of measurement and to argue over whether objective facts can exist. That’s important because scientists carry out experiments to establish objective facts. But if they experience different realities, the argument goes, how can they agree on what these facts might be? That’s provided some entertaining fodder for after-dinner conversation, but Wigner’s thought experiment has never been more than that—just a thought experiment.

Japan to set 5G network relay devices on traffic signals TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The Cabinet on Friday approved a project to install wireless relay devices for 5G network services on traffic signals across the country. Fifth-generation network technology requires more relay spots than the current 4G services as it uses short-length radio waves that cannot pass through buildings. However, there is a lack of suitable locations for new base stations as suitable locations already house equipment for existing services. Muslims Worked a Soup Kitchen on Christmas Eve to Give Christians the Day Off In a gesture of goodwill and human decency, a group of Muslims in Detroit volunteered at a Christian church’s soup kitchen on Christmas Eve so the usual volunteers could take time off for the holiday. Volunteers served up meals at the soup kitchen inside St. Peter’s Episcopal Church.

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