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Periodic Table of Elements [Interactive]

Periodic Table of Elements [Interactive]
Hydrogen Fun Fact: Despite all the nuclear fusion that has occurred in stars since the big bang, hydrogen is still by far the most abundant element in the universe, and makes up four-fifths of all ordinary matter. For a while it was touted as the fuel of the future, but it remains difficult to produce, transport and store. At extreme temperatures and pressures, like those at the core of a gas-giant planet, hydrogen can become metallic. He Helium Fun Fact: It is not the lightest of all elements, but it is the smallest: it has a stronger electrostatic charge in its nucleus than hydrogen does, and thus it keeps its electrons in a tighter orbit. Li Lithium Fun Fact: One of only three elements to be created in the big bang, though in much smaller amounts than hydrogen or helium. Be Beryllium Fun Fact: This element is the first one that requires more neutrons than protons in its nucleus in order to be stable, and thus it created a bottleneck in the formation of new elements after the big bang. Boron

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Twelve Free Chemistry Databases Just two years ago, trying to find free online chemistry databases was an exercise in futility. Now, they're sprouting up all over the Web like wildflowers after a wet Spring. What follows is a far-from-complete roundup of some of the more interesting places to start your chemical search. PubChem- The granddaddy of all free chemistry databases. Search over 8 million compounds by a variety of criteria. Although some PubChem records are linked into the primary literature through MeSH, most are not. Cranial Nerves - StumbleUpon Can't remember the names of the cranial nerves? Here is a handy-dandy mnemonic for you: On Old Olympus Towering Top AFamous Vocal German Viewed Some Hops.

Periodic Table of Elements [Interactive] Hydrogen Fun Fact: Despite all the nuclear fusion that has occurred in stars since the big bang, hydrogen is still by far the most abundant element in the universe, and makes up four-fifths of all ordinary matter. For a while it was touted as the fuel of the future, but it remains difficult to produce, transport and store. At extreme temperatures and pressures, like those at the core of a gas-giant planet, hydrogen can become metallic. Bonsai styles, shapes and forms explained Over the years many styles to classify Bonsai trees have been advanced, closely resembling circumstances in nature. These styles are open to personal interpretation and creativity, meaning that trees do not necessarily need to conform to any form. Still, the styles are important to gain a basic understanding of shapes and should serve as guidelines to successfully train miniature trees. Bonsai styles movie The Bonsai styles More information

15 Awesome Chemistry GIFs You don’t need to watch Breaking Bad to know that chemistry is pretty awesome. Below, we explore our favorite 15 chemistry GIFs and the science behind them (when we could figure it out): Melting Metal With Magnets The Science: The copper wire has a significant amount of AC electricity running through it, causing it to act like a really strong electromagnet. General Issues in Scaling « PreviousHomeNext » S.S. Stevens came up with what I think is the simplest and most straightforward definition of scaling. He said: Scaling is the assignment of objects to numbers according to a rule.

100 Websites You Should Know and Use Entertainment Meet David Peterson, who developed Dothraki for Game of Thrones There are seven different words in Dothraki for striking another person with a sword. Among them: “hlizifikh,” a wild but powerful strike; “hrakkarikh,”a quick and accurate strike; and “gezrikh,” a fake-out or decoy strike. But you won’t find these words in George R. R. Reversible flow (when I show this in class, minds are blown) 12Google + 33StumbleUpon Interesting video showing Laminar Flow and demonstrating fluid flowing in layers. Very cool! Filmed at the University of New Mexico – Physics Department. This apparatus was developed by John DeMoss and Kevin Cahill of the Department of Physics & Astronomy.

Brain Scanner Records Dreams on Video Just a few weeks ago, we posted about how brain patterns can reveal almost exactly what you're thinking. Now, researchers at UC Berkeley have figured out how to extract what you're picturing inside your head, and they can play it back on video. The way this works is very similar to the mind-reading technique that we covered earlier this month. A functional MRI (fMRI) machine watches the patterns that appear in people's brains as they watch a movie, and then correlates those patterns with the image on the screen.

How big is a mole? (Not the animal, the other one.) - Daniel Dulek A comprehensive biography of Avogadro can be found here: The mole is taught in every introductory chemistry class one can take at the college level. Here's an example of a chemistry course: There is an entire day dedicated to commemorating Avogadro's Number. National Mole Day: What number is halfway between 1 and 9? Is it 5 — or 3? Ask adults from the industrialized world what number is halfway between 1 and 9, and most will say 5. But pose the same question to small children, or people living in some traditional societies, and they're likely to answer 3. Cognitive scientists theorize that that's because it's actually more natural for humans to think logarithmically than linearly: 30 is 1, and 32 is 9, so logarithmically, the number halfway between them is 31, or 3. Neural circuits seem to bear out that theory.

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