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My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)
Edit Storyline Two young girls, Satsuki and her younger sister Mei, move into a house in the country with their father to be closer to their hospitalized mother. Satsuki and Mei discover that the nearby forest is inhabited by magical creatures called Totoros (pronounced toe-toe-ro). They soon befriend these Totoros, and have several magical adventures. Written by Christopher E.

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Top 10 Screenwriting Tips Introduction to Screenwriting How to become a screenwriter Over the last quarter century I’ve stumbled and lurched my way to some understanding of the screenwriter’s craft. As our AFTRS Graduate Certificate of Screenwriting students begin their journey, I thought I’d share the 10 things I wish I’d know when I started out. 1. Why people go to the movies If you’re making films to be viewed by the cinema-going public, it would seem pretty obvious that you should seek to understand why people go the movies, wouldn’t it? Not to me. Hayao Miyazaki Hayao Miyazaki (宮崎 駿, Miyazaki Hayao?, born January 5, 1941[2]) is a Japanese film director, producer, screenwriter, animator, author, and manga artist. Through a career that has spanned five decades, Miyazaki has attained international acclaim as a masterful storyteller and as a maker of anime feature films and, along with Isao Takahata, co-founded Studio Ghibli, a film and animation studio. The success of Miyazaki's films has invited comparisons with American animator Walt Disney, and American directors Steven Spielberg and Orson Welles.[3]

Michael Clayton Beat Sheet Written and Directed by Tony Gilroy Running time: 116 minutes Year: 2008 PROTAGONIST: Michael Clayton, a mid-40’s, high-powered law firm’s fixer.CHARACTERIZATION/MAIN MISBEHAVIOR: former gambling addict and fixer of immoral actions. He is a demoralized man in the midst of financial strain.EXTERNAL GOAL: To pay off the loan shark / To solve Arthur’s murderINTERNAL GOAL: To find purpose in life / To redeem himself of past sinsMAIN DRAMATIC CONFLICT: Arthur and U/North.THEME: Redemption can come with a high price.CENTRAL DRAMATIC QUESTION: Will Michael redeem himself for years of playing clean-up for the immoral games of others?ENDING: Michael secretly tapes a confession from U/North CEO, Karen Crowder, for both Arthur’s murder and his attempted murder, and single-handedly takes down both U/North and Kenner Bach.ARC: Michael goes from a fixer of immoral actions, to man a who sacrifices his career and wealth to call attention to the unethical deeds of both U/North and Kenner Bach.

Compassion Compassion personified: a statue at the Epcot center in Florida Compassion is the response to the suffering of others that motivates a desire to help.[1][2] Compassion is often, though not inevitably, the key component in what manifests in the social context as altruism. 10 Screenwriting Lessons You Can Learn from "The Graduate" For the foreseeable future, every Tuesday will be a Scriptshadow Secrets type breakdown of a great movie, giving you 10-12 screenwriting lessons from some of the best movies of all time. Today will be the first entry, “The Graduate.” Next week will be The Big Lewbowski. And going forward from there, I’ll be taking suggestions. Feel free to offer potential films in the comments section, and if you like what someone’s suggested, make sure to “like” their comment so I know what the most popular requests are.

Themes In contemporary literary studies, a theme is the central topic a text treats.[1] Themes can be divided into two categories: a work's thematic concept is what readers "think the work is about" and its thematic statement being "what the work says about the subject".[2] The most common contemporary understanding of theme is an idea or concept that is central to a story, which can often be summed in a single word (e.g. love, death, betrayal). Typical examples of themes of this type are conflict between the individual and society; coming of age; humans in conflict with technology; nostalgia; and the dangers of unchecked ambition.[3][examples needed] A theme may be exemplified by the actions, utterances, or thoughts of a character in a novel. An example of this would be the theme loneliness in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, wherein many of the characters seem to be lonely.

Peter Bradshaw’s top 50 films of the demi-decade As far as actors are concerned, the first five years of the 2010s proved that you can’t make it big unless you’re prepared to get into the Lycra and stride around in front of the greenscreen. This has been the demi-decade of the superhero, coming alongside genres like sci-fi and fantasy. Perhaps it’s surprising that it didn’t happen long ago and that, until very recently, only three or four A-list superheroes were being consistently reinvented in franchise properties. Now there are dozens, with the Marvel stable a powerhouse of profitable movies. In the past five years, we have also seen the emergence of a recognisable new genre, young adult, drawn from colossal multi-volume bestsellers targeted at teens: these fanbases are formidably loyal, intelligent, opinionated, with a sense of self and identity; the product driven by social media. As far as international arthouse movie trends go, it’s difficult to tell.

Critics Art criticism is the discussion or evaluation of visual art.[1][2][3] Art critics usually criticize art in the context of aesthetics or the theory of beauty.[2][3] A goal of criticism is the pursuit of a rational basis for art appreciation,[1][2][3] however, critics and criticism cannot escape the socio-political situation of their own time.[4] The variety of artistic movements has resulted in a division of art criticism into different disciplines, each using vastly different criteria for their judgements.[3][5] The most common division in the field of criticism is between historical criticism and evaluation, a form of art history, and contemporary criticism of work by living artists.[1][2][3]

Discrimination Discrimination is the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their actual or perceived membership in a certain group or category, "in a way that is worse than the way people are usually treated."[1] It involves the group's initial reaction or interaction, influencing the individual's actual behavior towards the group or the group leader, restricting members of one group from opportunities or privileges that are available to another group, leading to the exclusion of the individual or entities based on logical or irrational decision making.[2] Discriminatory traditions, policies, ideas, practices, and laws exist in many countries and institutions in every part of the world, even in ones where discrimination is generally looked down upon. In some places, controversial attempts such as quotas or affirmative action have been used to benefit those believed to be current or past victims of discrimination—but have sometimes been called reverse discrimination themselves. Etymology[edit]

Racism Some definitions consider that any assumption that a person's behavior would be influenced by their racial categorization is inherently racist, regardless of whether the action is intentionally harmful or pejorative, because stereotyping necessarily subordinates individual identity to group identity. Racism and racial discrimination are often used to describe discrimination on an ethnic or cultural basis, independent of whether these differences are described as racial. According to the United Nations convention, there is no distinction between the terms racial discrimination and ethnic discrimination, and superiority based on racial differentiation is scientifically false, morally condemnable, socially unjust and dangerous, and that there is no justification for racial discrimination, in theory or in practice, anywhere.[10] Usage of the term and related terms

Equanimity Equanimity (Latin: æquanimitas having an even mind; aequus even animus mind/soul) is a state of psychological stability and composure which is undisturbed by experience of or exposure to emotions, pain, or other phenomena that may cause others to lose the balance of their mind. The virtue and value of equanimity is extolled and advocated by a number of major religions and ancient philosophies. Hinduism[edit]

Me Me or ME may also refer to: In arts and entertainment Music Other Medicine Filmmakers Parts[edit] Film production consists of five major stages:[1] Development — The first stage in which the ideas for the film are created, rights to books/plays are bought etc., and the screenplay is written. Financing for the project has to be sought and greenlit.Pre-production—Preparations are made for the shoot, in which cast and film crew are hired, locations are selected, and sets are built.Production—The raw elements for the film are recorded during the film shoot.Post-production—The images, sound, and visual effects of the recorded film are edited.Distribution—The finished film is distributed and screened in cinemas and/or released to home video. Development[edit] Next, a screenwriter writes a screenplay over a period of several months.