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Irish Culture & Customs of Ireland - Irish Traditions, Folklore, Recipes & History

Irish Culture & Customs of Ireland - Irish Traditions, Folklore, Recipes & History
Related:  Ireland

Irish culture and Irish customs - World Cultures European » 7 Irish Proverbs Adopted Into Pop Culture When Saint Patrick’s Day rolls around, everyone embraces a little Irish spirit. Sporting shamrocks and shillelaghs and wearing a bit o’ green, friends come together to celebrate this most Celtic tradition — and no one celebrates like the Irish! Given the enthusiasm with which America endorses this holiday, perhaps it’s no surprise that Irish culture has blended so happily with American pop culture. In honor of Saint Patrick’s Day, here are a few examples of Irish wisdom and sayings that have come to be part of modern culture. May the Road Rise Up to Meet You Chances are you’ve seen this famous blessing stitched on a pillow at your Irish granny’s house or emblazoned on a plaque hung near her door. It Is Often That a Person’s Mouth Broke His Nose Sure, this one plays into the stereotype of an Irishman’s passion for brawling, but this good advice applies to everyone equally. A Son Is a Son ‘Til He Takes Him a Wife. The Older the Fiddle, the Sweeter the Tune Slainte!

Ireland in the Movies Whether you are planning a holiday or just interested in Ireland in general, movies can be a great way to explore the country from your armchair. Here are my ten top picks of movies you should see ... but be aware that this a very personal list! Some classics such as "Ryan's Daughter" and "Man of Aran" are missing, as are "The Field" with the inimitable Richard Harris and the rather uneven "Patriot Games" based on Tom Clancy's novel. Michael Collins Liam Neeson stars as the "Big Fellow" himself while Alan Rickman delivers an icy performance as ally-turned-enemy de Valera. The Quiet Man John Wayne is the famed boxer returning from the USA to Connemara to live a quiet life - which local rivals try to hinder and the flame-haired Maureen O'Hara considerably complicates. Angela's Ashes Limerick still has the nickname "Stab City" due to numerous incidents involving sharp, pointed implements - but is has come a long way from the depressing greyness of Frank McCourt's childhood. Waking Ned Devive

Irish Customs, Food and Fun Folklore for Your Family Reunion - CustomInk Celebrating culture and heritage is plenty of fun for Irish families when they get together for a family reunion. Ireland has a rich history of arts, music, dance, mythology, and cuisine. By introducing some of these aspects in a family reunion, it is a wonderful way of passing down parts of one’s heritage to the next generation. Many people in the U.S. have Irish ancestry. Even if you have not been to Ireland, there is still plenty you can do to celebrate the culture. Irish Traditions Irish song and dance have become well-known in the last couple of decades thanks to the award-winning touring show, Riverdance. Irish Food Although potatoes have come to be a bit of an Irish stereotype, they are usually joined by several other foods. Irish Folklore Most people are familiar with the image of the Irish leprechaun.

Ireland Map / Geography of Ireland / Map of Ireland The last Ice Age melted away some 10,000 years ago, and that dramatic event created the English Channel, Irish Sea and hundreds of rivers and lakes. Great Britain and Ireland (long attached to the European continent) were now islands, and cultural history was about to change. The Celtic people occupied great stretches of land across central Europe by 500 BC. They first arrived in Ireland around 300 BC, subsequently controlling and influencing this land that the powerful Roman culture never reached. The Pope in Rome (Celestinus the First) sent the first Christian missionaries to Ireland in the 5th century, including St. This somewhat peaceful Celtic world was first invaded by the Vikings in the late 8th century. Localized fighting over land and property continued for decades, but over time, some Celtic family groups and Vikings reached alliances - sort of a workable, live together understanding. Understandably, the now angry and proud Celts rebelled, and bloody riots soon followed.

Burren National Park - Homepage How St. Patrick's Day Works" Regardless of your heritage, you're prob­ably very aware of St. Patrick's Day. Celebrated each year on March 17, it's a day when people from all sorts of national and ethnic backgrounds dip a toe in Irish culture. Many observe the day by sporting a bright green shirt and meeting up with friends at a favorite local Irish pub. But there's a lot more to St. Patrick's Day than simply wearing green and knocking back a pint of Guinness. ­­For instance, who was Saint Patrick? As the luck of the Irish would have it, we've got the answers to these questions as well as lots more information about this historic holiday. St Patrick North Ireland profile - Overview 17 January 2013Last updated at 11:40 ET Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom, is emerging from a period of conflict known as "the Troubles" and is attempting to implement an historic peace deal. Security has returned - though not without occasional reminders of the bad old days - and Northern Ireland has begun to reap the economic and social benefits. But divisions persist, finding physical form in the barriers that separate some communities. Preferences in schooling, sport and culture often follow ethnic and religious fault lines. Northern Ireland is made up of six counties and forms part of the province of Ulster. Giant murals became one of the main symbols of Northern Ireland's divisions Continue reading the main story Politics: Efforts to overcome the long conflict between pro-UK Unionists and pro-Ireland Nationalists has led to a devolved power-sharing government involving both sides. Profiles compiled by BBC Monitoring Religious and cultural traditions meld with politics.

Bobby Sands Biography Early Years A hero among Irish nationalists, Robert Gerard "Bobby" Sands was born in Belfast, Ireland on March 9, 1954. Bobby Sands was the oldest of four children born to John and Rosaleen Sands, and the couple's first son. At an early age, Sands's life was affected by the sharp divisions that shaped Northern Ireland. At the age of 10, he was forced to move with his family out of their neighborhood due to repeated intimidation by British loyalists. "I was only a working-class boy from a Nationalist ghetto," Sands later wrote about his childhood. Loyalist intimidation proved to be a theme in Sands's life. Activism The steady number of conflicts pushed Sands to join the Republican Movement in 1972. In late 1976, authorities arrested Sands again, this time in connection with a bombing that had taken place at a large furniture company, and an ensuing gun battle. As a prisoner, Sands's stature only grew. Death and Legacy

Northern Ireland: A brief background to the conflict FAQs ABOUT NORTHERN IRELAND Ireland's history is a long story of suffering, suppression and poverty, but also one of strong people who refuse to give up and who manage to see things from a humorous side in the face of hardship. After most of Ireland got its freedom from Britain, the northern part remained in union with England, Scotland and Wales. In the following text we will look at some frequently asked questions (FAQs) in connection with the situation in Northern Ireland. Note: To find out more about the history of the conflict and the current situation in Northern Ireland, go to the links given below. What is the difference between Ireland and Northern Ireland? Ireland – or the Republic of Ireland as it is officially named – is now a completely separate country and has no longer any formal bond to the UK. Copyright: Getty Images Why is there so much talk of Catholics and Protestants in the conflict in Northern Ireland? Why has this separation between the two Irish nations taken place?

Tracks 2013: FAQ: The conflict in Northern Ireland Ireland's history is a long story of suffering, suppression and poverty, but also one of strong people who refuse to give up and who manage to see things from a humorous side in the face of hardship. After most of Ireland got its freedom from Britain, the northern part remained in union with England, Scotland and Wales. In the following text we will look at some frequently asked questions (FAQ) in connection with the situation in Northern Ireland. What is the difference between Ireland and Northern Ireland? Ireland – or the Republic of Ireland as it is officially named – is a completely separate country and has no longer any formal bond to the UK. Why is there so much talk of Catholics and Protestants in the conflict in Northern Ireland? The Republic of Ireland is historically a Catholic country and a large majority of the Irish are Catholics. Why has this separation between the two Irish nations taken place? Ireland is one of England’s first colonies. Is the conflict a religious one?

Authentic video in the classroom: Ireland II | Elisabeth Horn My second example of utilising authentic video in the EFL classroom is based on the same 50-minute travel video as my first. Of course, one can apply this to any video, but this time I will stick with Ireland. How I do it now will, however, differ from my last post because now I’ll concentrate on the language and vocabulary awareness in detail (but I wouldn’t use both methods on the same video in the same class, though). This approach is, however, associated with a lot of painstaking preparatory work for the teacher, because transcription of the video material needs to be done, at least for some of the clips. It takes about 1 hour to take down 5 minutes of video material, so one needs plenty of time to get a complete transcript. I rather enjoy transcribing videos and sound; oddly enough I experience the process as relaxing, especially if there is no deadline approaching. The “game board” that the students start out with looks like this: 1. 2. 3. 4A Road bowling 4B Janus the fertility god

Authentic video in the classroom: Ireland I | Elisabeth Horn What you see here is an approximately 3-minute clip from a 50-minute travel video on Ireland. It is authentic, in the sense that it’s intended for English-speaking people interested in travelling and other countries, not for language learners per se. “Ireland” is one of many videos in the Globetrekker series produced by UK-based Pilot Productions. The series is based on the concept of having a travel guide touring a specific country, experiencing cultural highlights, meeting local people and basically learning about the country together with the viewer. The “guide” is not the expert here, the experts are the locals, and the viewer travels the country in the “guise” of the guide, which makes the videos quite entertaining and exciting – and ideal for the language classroom. There is hardly any language classroom without the use of videos at one time or another. What activities are used in connection with video-clips in class? Quite a lot it would seem. Post-video phase 2 – Debriefing 1.

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