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ThePowerofPlay

ThePowerofPlay

https://ugc.futurelearn.com/uploads/files/4c/fb/4cfb8224-3c6a-476d-ae02-00145ce19c6b/ThePowerofPlay.pdf

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Convention on the Rights of the Child Arabic | Chinese | French | Russian | Spanish Text in PDF Format Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 entry into force 2 September 1990, in accordance with article 49 Preamble The States Parties to the present Convention, Considering that, in accordance with the principles proclaimed in the Charter of the United Nations, recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world, Bearing in mind that the peoples of the United Nations have, in the Charter, reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights and in the dignity and worth of the human person, and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom, Recalling that, in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the United Nations has proclaimed that childhood is entitled to special care and assistance, 1.

Taking Playtime Seriously So part of encouraging play is pulling back on how much programmed goal-directed learning we expect from very young children, to leave them time for the fun of exploration, curiosity and, well, fun. But another important part may be creating environments that foster children’s play and parents’ participation and attention. Dr. Hirsh-Pasek, who is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, cited its Learning Landscapes Initiative, which aims to set up learning opportunities in public places where people will encounter them. One of these, the Urban Thinkscape project in Philadelphia, involves puzzle benches at bus stops, with puzzles designed to build STEM skills. Before the benches were installed, she said, parents waiting for buses were almost uniformly looking at their cellphones. “We put one up in a park,” she said. Free play, she said, reduces stress and also “allows our kids to flex their entrepreneurial muscle.”

Importance of play for babies & children Australian Government Department of Education and Training (2009). Belonging, being and becoming: The early years learning framework for Australia. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved 19 June 2019 from Cole-Hamilton, I. (2011). Getting it right for play: The power of play: An evidence base. Fleer, M. (2013). Ginsburg, K.A. (2007). Lester, S., & Russell, W. (2010). Lui, C., Solis, S.L., Jensen, H., Hopkins, E.J., Neale, D., Zosh, J.M., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Whitebread, D. (2017). Whitebread, D., Neale, D., Jensen, H., Liu, C., Solis, S.L., Hopkins, E., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Zosh, J.M. (2017). Woods, A. (2013). Yogman, M., Garner, A., Hutchinson, J., Hirsh-Pasek, K. & Golinkoff, R.M., Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health & Council on Communications and Media (2018).

How young children learn English through play As we release Learning Time with Timmy – our first app for early-years learners of English – Danitza Villarroel, a teacher on our Learning Time with Shaun and Timmy course in Chile, explains the importance of learning through play, and offers a few tips for teachers new to this age group. Teaching English to pre-school children can be daunting for teachers new to this age group. Young children have shorter attention spans than older children and adults, and they're still learning their mother tongue. But teaching these learners can be enormously rewarding once you've taken a few basic principles on board. The importance of active learning Active learning means fully involving children in the learning process. Promoting learning through play Play is a very significant part of what life means to children at this stage of their development. Encouraging children's creativity and imagination It's important that we help young learners develop beyond mere language abilities.

One theory all teachers with disruptive children should know about Imagine a classroom where children are unable to wait their turn or stay focused on their work. They are easily distracted, cannot remember basic instructions or hold enough information in their head to solve problems – skills teachers rely on in order to teach successfully. These behavioural issues are all examples of problems that can arise from attachment issues – based on the relationship between children and their main caregiver. Attachment theory is now one of the world’s most well-researched theories about human development. Research has shown that secure attachments create mental processes that enable a child to regulate emotions and attune to others. In turn, these processes support the foundation of “executive functioning skills”. Trauma takes its toll Insecure attachments develop if early interactions between a child and their parent or caregiver are more negative, more inconsistent or more insensitive. Making teachers aware

5 ways to win over parents to the importance of play in international EYFS | Tes "I’m not sending my child to school for them play all day. They should be learning properly!" Have you ever overheard comments like this? Or read something similar on social media? Learning through play: What are the benefits? Digital storytelling: 4 steps to create digital stories for language learning Early years foundation stage: Everything you need to know The idea that children learn best through play is not new, with the likes of Vygotsky, Piaget, Montessori, Reggio Emilia and even the UK’s Department for Education promoting the value of play in early years education. You can be forgiven for finding this frustrating and maybe even a little insulting, given the time and consideration that has gone into setting up your classroom environment and the learning experiences that are available. I can certainly admit to having experienced these feelings. In the process, I have managed to turn some of the most cynical of parents into our greatest supporters. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why Movement is Essential in Early Childhood With so few years under their belts, my 3- and 6-year-old daughters are still learning to inhabit their bodies. They are learning how to maneuver themselves physically, how to orient themselves in space. As Vanessa Durand, a pediatrician at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, says, freedom of movement is necessary for children to meet their developmental milestones: “Children learn by experiencing their world using all of their senses. The restriction of movement, especially at a young age, impedes the experiential learning process.” Movement allows children to connect concepts to action and to learn through trial and error. Research has shown time and again that children need opportunities to move in class.

Bruce, Tina, 2015. Early Childhood Education: 5th Edition Hodder...

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