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Eros

In Greek mythology, Eros (, ;[2] Ancient Greek: Ἔρως, "Desire") is the Greek god of love and sex. His Roman counterpart was Cupid ("desire").[3] Normally, he is described as one of the children of Aphrodite and Ares and, with some of his siblings, was one of the Erotes, a group of winged love gods. In some traditions, he is described as one of the primordial gods. Etymology[edit] The Greek ἔρως, meaning "desire," comes from ἔραμαι "to desire, love", of uncertain etymology. R. Cult and depiction[edit] Eros appears in ancient Greek sources under several different guises. A cult of Eros existed in pre-classical Greece, but it was much less important than that of Aphrodite. Primordial god[edit] Homer does not mention Eros. At the beginning there was only Chaos, Night (Nyx), Darkness (Erebus), and the Abyss (Tartarus). Son of Aphrodite and Ares[edit] [Hera addresses Athena:] “We must have a word with Aphrodite. Eros and Psyche[edit] Eros in art[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] ^ A. References[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eros

Related:  Memories, dreams, and reflections - Carl JungMetamorphoses by Ovid-

Libido Libido (/lɪˈbiːdoʊ/; colloquial: sex drive) is a person's overall sexual drive or desire for sexual activity. Libido is influenced by biological, psychological and social factors. Biologically, the sex hormones and associated neurotransmitters that act upon the nucleus accumbens (primarily testosterone and dopamine, respectively) regulate libido in humans.[1] Social factors, such as work and family, and internal psychological factors, such as personality and stress, can affect libido. Libido can also be affected by medical conditions, medications, lifestyle and relationship issues, and age (e.g., puberty). A person who has extremely frequent or a suddenly increased sex drive may be experiencing hypersexuality, while the opposite condition is hyposexuality.

Shirt of Nessus In Greek mythology, the Shirt of Nessus, Tunic of Nessus, Nessus-robe, or Nessus' shirt was the poisoned shirt that killed Heracles. It was once a popular reference in literature. In folkloristics, it is considered an instance of the "poison dress" motif.[1] Mythology[edit] Deianira Ancient Greek mythical character Deianira, Deïanira, or Deianeira[1] (/ˌdeɪ.əˈnaɪrə/;[2] Ancient Greek: Δηϊάνειρα, Dēiáneira, or Δῃάνειρα, Dēáneira, [dɛːiáneːra]), also known as Dejanira,[3] was a figure in Greek mythology whose name translated as "man-destroyer"[4] or "destroyer of her husband".[5][6] She was the wife of Heracles and, in late Classical accounts, his unwitting murderer, killing him with the poisoned Shirt of Nessus. She is the main character in Sophocles' play Women of Trachis. Mythology[edit] Family and marriage[edit]

Death drive In classical Freudian psychoanalytic theory, the death drive (German: Todestrieb) is the drive toward death and self-destruction. It was originally proposed by Sabina Spielrein in her paper "Destruction as the Cause of Coming Into Being"[1][2] (Die Destruktion als Ursache des Werdens)[3] in 1912, which was then taken up by Sigmund Freud in 1920 in Beyond the Pleasure Principle. This concept has been translated as "opposition between the ego or death instincts and the sexual or life instincts".[4] In Pleasure Principle, Freud used the plural "death drives" (Todestriebe) much more frequently than in the singular.[5] Origin of the theory: Beyond the Pleasure Principle[edit] The first problem Freud encountered was the phenomenon of repetition in (war) trauma.

Deucalion Deucalion from "Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum" Etymology[edit] According to folk etymology, Deucalion's name comes from δεῦκος, deukos, a variant of γλεῦκος, gleucos, i.e. Beyond the Pleasure Principle Importance[edit] In sections IV and V, Freud posits that the process of creating living cells binds energy and creates an imbalance. It is the pressure of matter to return to its original state which gives cells their quality of living. The process is analogous to the creation and exhaustion of a battery. This pressure for molecular diffusion can be called a "death-wish".

Jupiter Fifth planet from the Sun in the Solar System Formation and migration Astronomers have discovered nearly 500 planetary systems with multiple planets. Wilhelm Fliess Wilhelm Fliess (German: Wilhelm Fließ; 24 October 1858 – 13 October 1928) was a German Jewish otolaryngologist who practised in Berlin. He developed highly eccentric theories of human biorhythms and a possible nasogenital connection that have not been accepted by modern scientists. He is today best remembered for his close personal friendship and theoretical collaboration with Sigmund Freud, a controversial chapter in the history of psychoanalysis. Career[edit] Fliess developed several idiosyncratic theories, such as 'vital periodicity', forerunner of the popular concepts of biorhythms.

Leto Greek mythological figure and mother of Apollo and Artemis The island of Kos is claimed to be her birthplace. However, Diodorus, in 2.47 states clearly that Leto was born in Hyperborea and not in Kos.[2] In the Olympian scheme, Zeus is the father of her twins,[3] Apollo and Artemis, which Leto conceived after her hidden beauty accidentally caught the eye of Zeus. Classical Greek myths record little about Leto other than her pregnancy and search for a place where she could give birth to Apollo and Artemis, since Hera in her jealousy caused all lands to shun her.

Peripheral nervous system The peripheral nervous system (PNS) is one of the two main parts of the nervous system, the other part is the central nervous system (CNS). The PNS consists of the nerves and ganglia outside of the brain and spinal cord.[1] The main function of the PNS is to connect the CNS to the limbs and organs, essentially serving as a relay between the brain and spinal cord and the rest of the body.[2] Unlike the CNS, the PNS is not protected by the vertebral column and skull, or by the blood–brain barrier, which leaves it exposed to toxins and mechanical injuries. The peripheral nervous system is divided into the somatic nervous system and the autonomic nervous system. Artemis Deity in ancient Greek religion and myth Artemis is the daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo. She was the patron and protector of young girls, and was believed to bring disease upon women and relieve them of it. Artemis was worshipped as one of the primary goddesses of childbirth and midwifery along with Eileithyia. Much like Athena and Hestia, Artemis preferred to remain a maiden and is sworn never to marry. Artemis was one of the most widely venerated of the Ancient Greek deities and her temple at Ephesus was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

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