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Alejandro Jodorowsky

Alejandro Jodorowsky
Alejandro Jodorowsky (Spanish: [aleˈxandɾo xoðoˈɾofski]; born 17 February 1929)[1][2][3] is a Chilean[4][5] filmmaker, playwright, play director, actor, author, poet, musician, comics writer and spiritual guru. Best known for his avant-garde films, he has been "venerated by cult cinema enthusiasts" for his work which "is filled with violently surreal images and a hybrid blend of mysticism and religious provocation".[6] Born to Jewish-Ukrainian parents in Chile, Jodorowsky experienced an unhappy and alienated childhood, and so immersed himself in reading and writing poetry. Dropping out of college, he became involved in theater and in particular mime, working as a clown before founding his own theater troupe, the Teatro Mimico, in 1947. Moving to Paris in the early 1950s, Jodorowsky studied mime under Étienne Decroux before turning to cinema, directing the short film Les têtes interverties in 1957. Biography[edit] Early years (1929–1952)[edit] Dune and Tusk (1975–1980)[edit] Comics[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alejandro_Jodorowsky

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The Best Documentaries of 2011 Note: This chart was updated in February 2012. View the updated post » What was the best documentary of 2011? That depends on who you ask, of course. John Huston Huston was known to direct with the vision of an artist, having studied and worked as a fine art painter in Paris in his early years. He continued to explore the visual aspects of his films throughout his career: sketching each scene on paper beforehand, then carefully framing his characters during the shooting[citation needed]. While most directors rely on post-production editing to shape their final work, Huston instead created his films while they were being shot, making them both more economical and cerebral, with little editing needed[citation needed].

Suppressed Technology 'Lost Lightning: The Missing Secrets of Nikola Tesla' - Full Film Home | About Us | Contact | Subscribe 'Lost Lightning: The Missing Secrets ofNikola Tesla' - Full Film Phenomenon: The Lost Archives We Sting U ForbiddenKnowledgeTV Alexandra Bruce August 6, 2013 Walter Hill (director) Hill said in an interview that "every film I've done has been a Western", and elaborated in another that "the Western is ultimately a stripped down moral universe that is, whatever the dramatic problems are, beyond the normal avenues of social control and social alleviation of the problem, and I like to do that even within contemporary stories".[1] Hill was born in Long Beach, California, the younger of two sons. His paternal grandfather was a wildcat oil driller; his father worked at Douglas Aircraft as a supervisor on the assembly line.[2] Hill said that his father and grandfather were "smart, physical men who worked with their heads and their hands" and had "great mechanical ability".[3] Hill's family had originally come from Tennessee and Mississippi, "one of those fallen Southern families, shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations".[4]

Norman Holland on Marcel Carné's Children of Paradise A poll of 600 French critics and professionals in 1995 voted this film “Best French Film Ever,” and many surveys since then have dittoed that. Oddly though, this masterpiece of film is almost an anti-movie. It announces itself as theater. Watch WE THE ECONOMY Online Free – Viewster Everyone is talking about the economy, but who can explain it? From that morning cup of coffee to your monthly mortgage payment, the economy affects every aspect of our lives, yet many Americans don’t understand the basic drivers of our economic system. We’re caught between bubbles and recessions, rising costs and dwindling paychecks, Main Street and Wall Street – a whirl of dollars and not much sense. With WE THE ECONOMY, award­-winning directors and leading economic experts team up for a surprising and thought­-provoking short­ film series that tackles 20 essential questions about the U.S. economy. Told through animation, comedy, musical, nonfiction, and scripted films, WE THE ECONOMY seeks to demystify a complicated topic while empowering the public to take control of the nation’s economic present – and their own economic futures. 1) CAVE-O-NOMICS (Dir. Morgan Spurlock): How did the economy get started?

Jean-Luc Godard Jean-Luc Godard (French: [ʒɑ̃lyk ɡɔdaʁ]; born 3 December 1930) is a French-Swiss film director, screenwriter and film critic. He is often identified with the 1960s French film movement La Nouvelle Vague, or "New Wave". Like his New Wave contemporaries, Godard criticized mainstream French cinema's "Tradition of Quality", which "emphasized craft over innovation, privileged established directors over new directors, and preferred the great works of the past to experimentation." To challenge this tradition, he and like-minded critics started to make their own films.

300+ Mind Expanding Documentaries I watch a lot of documentaries. I think they are incredible tools for learning and increasing our awareness of important issues. The power of an interesting documentary is that it can open our minds to new possibilities and deepen our understanding of the world. On this list of mind expanding documentaries you will find different viewpoints, controversial opinions and even contradictory ideas. Critical thinking is recommended. Michael Haneke In 2013 Haneke won the Prince of Asturias Award for the arts. Life and career[edit] Haneke was born in Munich, Germany, the son of the German actor and director Fritz Haneke and the Austrian actress Beatrix von Degenschild. 10 Movies That Could Change Your Understanding Of Life Every movie has the ability to affect its viewer differently. Some films evoke wonder and excitement, while others provoke fear or sorrow, but a commonality among all films is a prevailing message or theme. Some films can summon such profound questions, that it changes the way you perceive life as you once knew it. The following list contains 10 unique movies that do just that.

Werner Herzog Werner Herzog Stipetić (German: [ˈʋɛɐ̯nɐ ˈhɛɐ̯tsoːk ˈstɪpɛtɪt͡ʃ]; born 5 September 1942), known as Werner Herzog, is a German film director, producer, screenwriter, author, actor and opera director. Herzog is considered one of the greatest figures of the New German Cinema, along with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Margarethe von Trotta, Volker Schlöndorff, Werner Schröter, and Wim Wenders. Herzog's films often feature heroes with impossible dreams,[1] people with unique talents in obscure fields, or individuals who are in conflict with nature.[2] French filmmaker François Truffaut once called Herzog "the most important film director alive."[3] American film critic Roger Ebert said that Herzog "has never created a single film that is compromised, shameful, made for pragmatic reasons or uninteresting.

Heidegger: Thinking the Unthinkable German philosopher Martin Heidegger addressed the central question of human existence full on, by examining how human self-awareness depends on concepts of time and death. His preoccupation with ontology - the form of metaphysical inquiry concerned with the study of existence itself - dominated his work. The central idea of his complex Sein und Zeit (Being and Time) (1927) could be summed up in the phrase 'being is'. Man had to ask himself 'what is it to be?' and only by doing this, and standing back from absorption into objects and other distractions, could he actually exist.

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