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List of Germanic deities

List of Germanic deities
In Germanic paganism, the indigenous religion of the ancient Germanic peoples that inhabited Germanic Europe, there were a number of different gods and goddesses. Germanic deities are attested from numerous sources, including works of literature, various chronicles, runic inscriptions, personal names, place names, and other sources. This article presents a comprehensive list of these deities. Gods[edit] Goddesses[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] Bellows, Henry Adams (Trans.) (1936).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Germanic_deities

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List of deities This is an index to polytheistic deities of the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world, listed by type and by region. This is not a list of names or epithets of gods in modern monotheistic religions, for which see "Names of God". For deified individuals see "List of people who have been considered deities", "Apotheosis" and "Imperial cult". For deities whose cult is fictional see "List of deities in fiction". Adwaita A zookeeper tends to Adwaita (2005) Adwaita (meaning "the only one" in Bengali)[1] was a male Aldabra giant tortoise that lived in the Alipore Zoological Gardens of Kolkata, India. At the time of his death in 2006, Adwaita was believed to be amongst the longest-living animals in the world. History[edit] Adwaita was reportedly given to Robert Clive (1725–1774) of the East India Company by British seafarers who captured it from Aldabra, an atoll in the Seychelles. This anecdotal report has not been confirmed.[2] The animal was one of four tortoises that resided at Clive's estate at Barrackpore, in the northern suburbs of Kolkata.[1] Adwaita was transferred to the Alipore Zoo in 1875 or 1876 by Carl Louis Schwendler, the founder of the zoo.[3] Adwaita lived in his enclosure in the zoo until his death on 22 March 2006.

6 Writers Who Broke the Rules and Got Away with It Have you ever read a book and noticed the author has broken what we writers often hear of as “the rules”? My initial reaction is usually indignation: “Why can she get away with that, and I can’t??” The more I study the craft of writing, the more rules I hear about, and most of these are guidelines based on making a book reader-friendly. As much as I believe it’s good practice to avoid the common pitfalls of beginning writers, there are always exceptions to every rule. Norse cosmology The cosmology of Norse mythology has "nine homeworlds", unified by the world tree Yggdrasill. Mapping the nine worlds escapes precision because the Poetic Edda often alludes vaguely. The Norse creation myth tells how everything came into existence in the gap between fire and ice, and how the gods shaped the homeworld of humans. Yggdrasill[edit]

Irish mythology Bunworth Banshee The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity. However, much of it was preserved in medieval Irish literature, though it was shorn of its religious meanings. This literature represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. Although many of the manuscripts have not survived and much more material was probably never committed to writing, there is enough remaining to enable the identification of distinct, if overlapping, cycles: the Mythological Cycle, the Ulster Cycle, the Fenian Cycle and the Historical Cycle.

List of mythologies This is a list of mythologies of the world, by culture and region. Mythologies by region[edit] Africa[edit] List of libraries in the ancient world The great libraries of the ancient world served as archives for empires, sanctuaries for sacred writings, and depositories of literature and chronicles. Anatolia[edit] Hattusa (1900 B.C. - 1190 B.C.)

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Numbers in Norse mythology The numbers three and nine are significant numbers in Norse mythology and paganism. Both numbers (and multiplications thereof) appear throughout surviving attestations of Norse paganism, in both mythology and cultic practice.[1] While the number three appears significant in many cultures, Norse mythology appears to put special emphasis on the number nine.

Moai Moai facing inland at Ahu Tongariki, restored by Chilean archaeologist Claudio Cristino in the 1990s Moai i/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Island between the years 1250 and 1500.[1] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue. The moai are chiefly the living faces (aringa ora) of deified ancestors (aringa ora ata tepuna).[2] The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island, but most were cast down during later conflicts between clans. Description[edit]

22 fascinating details you probably never noticed on Bruegel’s ’The Tower of Babel’ Nowadays it’s much easier to see famous paintings because you can just google them, but there are some paintings that require a particular approach. ’’The Tower of Babel’’ by Pieter Bruegel the Elder is one of them. This masterpiece was painted in 1563, and now to admire the original you need to visit the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. When we look at the painting it seems to us that we can see everything, but actually it’s not that easy! Bruegel is known and loved for his fancy for detail. With the permission of blogger Anton Afanas’ev, Bright Side wants to share his post to help you discover some details that aren’t that easy to notice at first gaze. ’’The Tower of Babel’’

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