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Twitter Literacy (I refuse to make up a Twittery name for it) - City Brights: Howard Rheingold

Twitter Literacy (I refuse to make up a Twittery name for it) - City Brights: Howard Rheingold
Post-Oprah and apres-Ashton, Twittermania is definitely sliding down the backlash slope of the hype cycle. It’s not just the predictable wave of naysaying after the predictable waves of sliced-breadism and bandwagon-chasing. We’re beginning to see some data. Nielsen, the same people who do TV ratings, recently noted that more than 60% of new Twitter users fail to return the following month. To me, this represents a perfect example of a media literacy issue: Twitter is one of a growing breed of part-technological, part-social communication media that require some skills to use productively. Sure, Twitter is banal and trivial, full of self-promotion and outright spam. When I started requiring digital journalism students to learn how to use Twitter, I didn’t have the list of journalistic uses for Twitter that I have compiled by now. One of my students asked me online why I use Twitter. Immediacy – it is a rolling present. A way to meet new people – it happens every day.

http://blog.sfgate.com/rheingold/2009/05/11/twitter-literacy-i-refuse-to-make-up-a-twittery-name-for-it/

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50 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom Many critics of Twitter believe that the 140-character microblog offered by the ubiquitous social network can do little for the education industry. They are wrong. K-12 teachers have taken advantage of Twitter’s format to keep their classes engaged and up-to-date on the latest technologies. The following projects provide you and your students with 50 ways to Twitter in the classroom to create important and lasting lessons. 1. Twitter Hacking Victims Find Stolen Accounts Sold On Black Market Eric Weaver tried logging in to his Twitter account this summer, but he was locked out. A hacker had broken into his account and changed the password. But it didn't end there. With a little digging, Weaver found that his Twitter handle -- @weave -- was being sold in an online forum at HackForums.net. With more digging, he also found that software was being sold online to automate the process of quickly hacking dozens of Twitter accounts. "I was surprised this was all happening so openly," said Weaver, an advertising executive in Seattle.

Mindful Infotention: Dashboards, Radars, Filters Infotention is a word I came up with to describe the psycho-social-techno skill/tools we all need to find our way online today, a mind-machine combination of brain-powered attention skills with computer-powered information filters. The inside and outside of infotention work best together: Honing the mental ability to deploy the form of attention appropriate for each moment is an essential internal skill for people who want to find, direct, and manage streams of relevant information by using online media knowledgeably.Knowing how to put together intelligence dashboards, news radars, and information filters from online tools like persistent search and RSS is the external technical component of information literacy. Knowing what to pay attention to is a cognitive skill that steers and focuses the technical knowledge of how to find information worth your attention. The overall system I’m seeking to understand is one of mindful infotention. Infotention Filters

Should I Say Thanks for Retweets? Yes. When you feel it’s appropriate, go for it. No one likes an arrogant, self-absorbed, asshole (except people like me,oddly enough). Saying thanks is a quick, easy way to connect with new followers or people who enjoyed a post. Some people think saying thanks for retweets clutters up the Twitter stream with noise. I disagree. U Rheingold U. is a totally online learning community, offering courses that usually run for five weeks, with five live sessions and ongoing asynchronous discussions through forums, blogs, wikis, mindmaps, and social bookmarks. In my thirty years of experience online and my eight years teaching students face to face and online at University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University, I've learned that magic can happen when a skilled facilitator works collaboratively with a group of motivated students. Live sessions include streaming audio and video from me and from students, shared text chat and whiteboard, and my ability to push slides and lead tours of websites.

25 Ways to Get the Most Out of Twitter Imagine being able to connect with one hundred million people anytime you want. With that many people on Twitter each day (and that’s not counting the additional 184 million users who are on Twitter at least once each month), a great deal of knowledge, perspective, and news is accessible to you, just by clicking a few buttons. It’s no wonder educators are harnessing the power of Twitter to bring cutting edge ideas, trends, research, and best practices to use in their schools and classrooms. But just as Twitter can be a treasure trove of information, it can be overwhelming for new users to figure out how to use it effectively. We’ve compiled this list of the best ways to make Twitter a social media tool that works for you. Image from Flickr via mkh marketing

Twitter Study Reveals the Secret to Getting More Followers After analyzing the Twitter profiles of 36 million users who have generated more than 28 billion tweets (that's 794 tweets per person in three years on average), Beevolve's social analytics research reveals user follower bases directly correlate with how much they tweet. A Twitter user who has written 1 to 1000 tweets has an average of 51 to 100 followers, whereas users who have tweeted more than 10,000 times tend to be followed by 1,001 to 5000 individuals. It's estimated that a person with more than 15,000 tweets has between 100,001 to 1 million followers.

Jan05_01 Editor’s Note: This is a milestone article that deserves careful study. Connectivism should not be con fused with constructivism. George Siemens advances a theory of learning that is consistent with the needs of the twenty first century. His theory takes into account trends in learning, the use of technology and networks, and the diminishing half-life of knowledge. It combines relevant elements of many learning theories, social structures, and technology to create a powerful theoretical construct for learning in the digital age. George Siemens

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