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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map
The Aboriginal Language Map attempts to represent all of the language or tribal or nation groups of Indigenous people of Australia. It indicates general locations of larger groupings of people which may include smaller groups such as clans, dialects or individual languages in a group. David R Horton is the creator of the Indigenous Language Map. This map is based on language data gathered by Aboriginal Studies Press, AIATSIS and Auslig/Sinclair, Knight, Merz, (1996). For more information about the groups of people in a particular region contact the relevant Land Councils. Use the magnifier to zoom into a region of interest. David R Horton, creator, © Aboriginal Studies Press, AIATSIS and Auslig/Sinclair, Knight, Merz, 1996. This map is just one representation of other map sources that are available for describing Aboriginal Australia.

http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/

Related:  Importance of Country and Place to Aboriginal PeopleAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander resourcesMappe socioculturali

Why a connection to country is so important to Aboriginal communities Trying to frame this concept in modern language, is like trying to grasp a two dimensional cup out of a piece of paper, it's the layers that make the cup palpable, not the drawing of it. Connection to country is inherent, we are born to it, it is how we identify ourselves, it is our family, our laws, our responsibility, our inheritance and our legacy. To not know your country causes a painful disconnection, the impact of which is well documented in studies relating to health, wellbeing and life outcomes. Modern constructs of identification do not work for us, in fact they dismantle the fabric that holds us together. For example, it matters not that my licence says that I live in Sydney, it matters that I am guest in this place, I respect it because I am from the Arrente and Luritja lands, and it is this knowledge that enables me to identify who I am, who my family is, who my ancestors were and what my stories are. What if I told you I can travel through time and worlds?

General - Aboriginal Education - The Department of Education Aboriginal English & ESL Educational Resources Information Centre (ERIC)Free database of resources that may assist teachers with teaching ESL/D students. Details Aboriginal Parent Easy Guides Parent Easy Guides (or PEGs as they are affectionately known) bring simple, easy-to-read information on many of the issues faced by parents from birth through adolescence.

The Map Of Native American Tribes - kplu Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived. Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans. As a teenager, Carapella says he could never get his hands on a continental U.S. map like this, depicting more than 600 tribes — many now forgotten and lost to history.  Australians Together More than soil, rocks or minerals For many Indigenous people in Australia, land is much more than soil, rocks or minerals. It’s a living environment that sustains and is sustained by people and culture. Traditionally, this reciprocal relationship between people and the land underpinned all other aspects of life for Indigenous people.

Indigenous Weather Knowledge - Bureau of Meteorology Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have developed an intricate understanding of the environment over many thousands of years. Artist: Laurie Nilsen The artwork used in the design of this website represents the relationships between seasonal, meteorological and astronomical changes - and how the Mandandanji people read these changes to inform life on country. 40 maps that explain the world By Max Fisher By Max Fisher August 12, 2013 Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable.

Guide to Aboriginal sites and places - Creative Spirits You can find Aboriginal sites everywhere in Australia. Even in heavily urbanised environments like Sydney many Aboriginal places survive. This guide outlines different Aboriginal sites and explains what Aboriginal people used them for [1]. A History of Aboriginal Sydney There is good evidence of a high Aboriginal population density at contact. Australia has a naturally occurring diversity of plant resources, rather than a few specific staples as in Papua New Guinea. These are easier to exploit if not planted. That is to say, Koori people are Polyculturists. The population may have been increasing at the time of the invasion. Butlin has calculated that the population certainly did not survive on kangaroos alone as a meat source.

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. A few are important to know, some interpret and display data in a beautiful or creative way, and a few may even make you chuckle or shake your head. If you enjoy this collection of maps, the Sifter highly recommends the r/MapPorn sub reddit.

Meaning of land to Aboriginal people - Creative Spirits What does land mean to Aboriginal people? Non-Indigenous people and land owners might consider land as something they own, a commodity to be bought and sold, an asset to make profit from, but also a means to make a living off it or simply 'home' . They 'develop' land, as if it was unfinished or raw.

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