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Nihon Shoki

Nihon Shoki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nihon_Shoki

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Japan, South Korea settle wartime sex slave dispute By Associated Press December 28 at 7:46 AM TOKYO — Japan and South Korea have reached an agreement to resolve their decades-long dispute over Korean victims of Japan’s World War II-era military prostitution system, with an apology by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and a pledge to set up a 1 billion yen ($8 million) fund for the victims, euphemistically called “comfort women.” Here are statements Monday by Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and his South Korean counterpart, Yun Byung-se, released by Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs: “Announcement by Foreign Ministers of Japan and the Republic of Korea at the Joint Press Occasion “1. Foreign Minister Kishida

Kojiki Kojiki (古事記?, "Record of Ancient Matters") is the oldest extant chronicle in Japan, dating from the early 8th century (711–712) and composed by Ō no Yasumaro at the request of Empress Gemmei.[1] The Kojiki is a collection of myths concerning the origin of the four home islands of Japan, and the Kami. Along with the Nihon Shoki, the myths contained in the Kojiki are part of the inspiration behind Shinto practices and myths, including the misogi purification ritual.[2][3][4][5] Shintoshu The Shintōshū (神道集?) is a Japanese story book in ten volumes believed to date from the Nanboku-chō period (1336–1392).[1] It illustrates with tales about various shrines the Buddhist honji suijaku theory, according to which Japanese kami were simply local manifestations of the Indian gods of Buddhism. This theory, created and developed mostly by Tendai monks, was never systematized, but was nonetheless very pervasive and very influential.[2] The book had thereafter great influence over literature and the arts.[1] History[edit] The book is believed to have been written during the late Nanboku-chō period, either during the Bunna or the Enbun era.[3] It carries the note Agui-saku (安居院作?, made by Agui) but who exactly wrote it is unclear.

11 Beautiful Japanese Words That Don't Exist In English Once, when I asked my friend from a small tribe in Burma how they would say “breakfast” there, she told me that they didn’t have a word for it because they only ate twice a day--lunch and dinner. I happen to have a lot of friends who speak English as their second language and that made me realize that a language has a lot to do with its culture’s uniqueness. Because of that there are some untranslatable words. In Japanese culture, people have a lot of appreciation towards nature and it is very important to be polite towards others. That politeness and the nature appreciation reflected on to its language and created some beautiful words that are not translatable to English.

Kami Amaterasu, one of the central kami in the Shinto faith Kami (Japanese: 神?) are the spirits or phenomena that are worshipped in the religion of Shinto. They are elements in nature, animals, creationary forces in the universe, as well as spirits of the revered deceased. Buddhism Two major extant branches of Buddhism are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada ("The School of the Elders") and Mahayana ("The Great Vehicle"). Vajrayana, a body of teachings attributed to Indian siddhas, may be viewed as a third branch or merely a part of Mahayana. Theravada has a widespread following in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. Mahayana which includes the traditions of Pure Land, Zen, Nichiren Buddhism, Shingon, and Tiantai (Tendai) is found throughout East Asia. Tibetan Buddhism, which preserves the Vajrayana teachings of eighth century India,[4] is practiced in regions surrounding the Himalayas, Mongolia[5] and Kalmykia.[6] Buddhists number between an estimated 488 million[web 1] and 535 million, making it one of the world's major religions.

Umami Tomatoes are rich in umami components A loanword from the Japanese (うま味?), umami can be translated as "pleasant savory taste".[4] This particular writing was chosen by Professor Kikunae Ikeda from umai (うまい) "delicious" and mi (味) "taste". The kanji 旨味 are used for a more general sense of a food as delicious. Japanese mythology Japanese myths, as generally recognized in the mainstream today, are based on the Kojiki, the Nihon Shoki, and some complementary books. The Kojiki, or "Record of Ancient Matters", is the oldest surviving account of Japan's myths, legends and history. The Shintōshū describes the origins of Japanese deities from a Buddhist perspective, while the Hotsuma Tsutae records a substantially different version of the mythology. One notable feature of Japanese mythology is its explanation of the origin of the imperial family which has been used historically to assign godhood to the imperial line.

Shinto Shinto priest and priestess. Shinto (神道, Shintō?), also kami-no-michi,[note 1] is the indigenous religion of Japan and the people of Japan.[2] It is defined as an action-centered religion,[3] focused on ritual practices to be carried out diligently, to establish a connection between present-day Japan and its ancient past.[4] Founded in 660 BC according to Japanese mythology,[5] Shinto practices were first recorded and codified in the written historical records of the Kojiki and Nihon Shoki in the 8th century. Still, these earliest Japanese writings do not refer to a unified "Shinto religion", but rather to a collection of native beliefs and mythology.[6] Shinto today is a term that applies to the religion of public shrines devoted to the worship of a multitude of gods (kami),[7] suited to various purposes such as war memorials and harvest festivals, and applies as well to various sectarian organizations.

japanese artist brings ukiyo-e woodblock prints to life through animated gifs aug 18, 2015 japanese artist brings ukiyo-e woodblock prints to life through animated gifs japanese artist brings ukiyo-e woodblock prints to life through animated gifs(above) katsushika hokusai’s ‘yoshida at tokaido’ animated all gifs courtesy of segawa thirty-seven from the 17th through 19th centuries, ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings populated the japanese art and cultural movement. artist katsushika hokusai popularized the trend with his series of ’36 views of mount fuji’, depicting scenes of the renowned mountain captured in different seasons and weather conditions, from a variety of different places and perspectives. these compositions were created through a cooperative effort of craftsman, who each adopted traditional techniques to sketch, carve and colorize the works.

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