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12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins

12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins
12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins Article by Steph, filed under Abandoned Places in the Architecture category. Around the world, in places as diverse as Homestead, Florida and Yonaguni, Japan stand monuments and ruins whose origins are shrouded in mystery. Nobody knows exactly why Stonehenge was built, how a set of manmade ruins came to be submerged deep in the ocean or who commissioned a giant carved granite set of post-apocalyptic instructions for rebuilding society on a remote hill in Georgia. Monumental Instructions for the Post-Apocalypse (images via: Wired) On a barren knoll in northeastern Georgia stands one of the world’s most bizarre and mysterious monuments. Lake Michigan Stonehenge (image via: io9) A group of researchers using sonar to look for shipwrecks at the bottom of Lake Michigan got quite a surprise when they found what appears to be an ancient Stonehenge-like structure 40 feet beneath the surface of the water. Underwater Ruins in Japan (images via: Hottnez) Related:  Foreign Places We want to Gopmw

The Mysterious Dancing Forest of Kaliningrad Located on the thin Curonian Spit that splits the Curonian Lagoon from the Baltic Sea, lies one of the strangest natural phenomena on Earth. Known as the Dancing Forest by caretakers of Curonian Spit National Park and as the Drunken Forest, by locals, this unusual pine forest is made of trees of various shapes, most of them twisted in circles and spirals, along the ground. According to tourists, the Dancing Forest looks more like a site near Chernobyl, with 20-year-old pines tied into natural knots and loops, like lumpy contortionists. A few years ago, the park manager invited students from local universities to conduct studies, and get to the bottom of the mystery. Since then, several theories emerged, including one suggested by a psychic who said the forest is located on a spot where massive amounts of positive and negative energies collide. Others say the causes are geological, that it must have something to do with the unstable sandy soil. [Photo Credits] [Photo Credits] [Photo Credits]

Most Extreme Landscapes on Earth Our globe is home to some truly breathtaking and extraordinary sights. Be it strangely-shaped rock formations, alien-looking sulfur springs or unique chocolate hills, the world is full of such beautiful phenomena that no words can describe it. Pictures may help... Sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles, and spires are the main features of Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA. The park is also the largest protected mixed grass prairie in the country. Beside the unique rock formations, this bizarre land of extreme temperatures (-40F to 116F), high winds and dramatic weather changes is also home to the bison, bighorn sheep, endangered black-footed ferrets, and the swift fox. Incredible basalt columns can be found on the northeast coast of the Northern Ireland and on Staffa, a small island in Scotland. Apparently, the Chocolate Hills are not covered in the cocoa trees, and their name derives from the grass turning brown during the dry season. Penitentes in Death Valley. Penitenes in Andes.

Peruvian tomb discovery deemed 'as important as Machu Picchu' The discovery of nine ancient tombs in the Peruvian jungle is being called the most important find since Machu Picchu. The tombs belong to the Wari, a pre-Incan civilisation, and were unearthed in the highland province of Cuzco (pictured above). Experts expect to also unearth a city in the area, possibly that of the legendary lost city of riches, Paititi. "It opens a new chapter on archaeological research and forces us to re-write history," Juan Garcia from Peru's ministry of culture said. The site, known as Vilcabamba, was the Inca's last foothold of resistance against the Spanish before their nearly 400-year reign over the region came to an end in 1572AD. The find -- the first evidence of the Wari inhabiting Peru's jungles -- suggests the civilisation may have dominated other areas later taken over by the Incas, and indicates that the Incas will have inherited much of the Wari culture. Nazca culture appears to have been passed on to the Wari, and likewise the Wari to the Incan.

Our animated maps in free access - The map as history The first Christian communities (1st century) This map is part of a series of 17 animated maps showing History of Christianity. 4 are currently available online Independence for India and Pakistan Clement Attlee, the Labour Prime Minister who replaced Winston Churchill in July 1945, soon realised that independence for India was inevitable, but disagreements among the Indian politicians made the negotiations very difficult. This map is part of a series of 14 animated maps showing Decolonization after 1945 The circumference of the Earth and the Route towards the West In the 3rd century BCE, Eratosthenes calculated the circumference of the Earth with remarkable precision. In later centuries, other Greek geographers, including the most famous of them all Ptolemy, suggested a much lower figure for the circumference for our planet. This under-estimation was adopted by 15th century map-makers. This map is part of a series of 16 animated maps showing The Age of Discovery (Part I) Europe Plunges into War

This free online encyclopedia has achieved what Wikipedia can only dream of The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy may be the most interesting website on the internet. Not because of the content—which includes fascinating entries on everything from ambiguity to zombies—but because of the site itself. Its creators have solved one of the internet’s fundamental problems: How to provide authoritative, rigorously accurate knowledge, at no cost to readers. It’s something the encyclopedia, or SEP, has managed to do for two decades. The internet is an information landfill. Somewhere in it—buried under piles of opinion, speculation, and misinformation—is virtually all of human knowledge. The story of how the SEP is run, and how it came to be, shows that it is possible to create a less trashy internet—or at least a less trashy corner of it. The impossible trinity of information The online SEP has humble beginnings. That makes it positively ancient in internet years. The SEP is neither pre-internet, nor is it ossified. Where other encyclopedias fall short Landfill no more

The Other Mystery of Easter Island Moai statues Easter Island is branded into popular consciousness as the home of the mysterious and towering moai statues, but these are not the only curiosity the South Pacific island holds. Where the moai are fascinating for their unknown purpose and mysterious craftsmen, the island's lost language of Rongorongo is equally perplexing. The unique written language seems to have appeared suddenly in the 1700s, but within just two centuries it was exiled to obscurity. Known as Rapa Nui to the island's inhabitants, Rongorongo is a writing system comprised of pictographs. It has been found carved into many oblong wooden tablets and other artifacts from the island's history. In 1864, Father Joseph Eyraud became the first non-islander to record Rongorongo. Some time later, Bishop Florentin Jaussen of Tahiti attempted to translate the texts. Thompson was determined, however, and decided that Ure Va'e Iko might be more forthcoming under the influence of alcohol. An Indus valley connection?

10 Most Fascinating Holes on Earth Great Blue Hole (Belize) Located in Belize's Barrier Reef Reserve System, the "Great Blue Hole" is about 60 miles away from Belize City and is believed to be the world's largest sea-hole. It's 125 meters deep and 300 meters wide. It was created as a cause of sea level increase about 65,000 years ago. Its almost perfect circular shape made it very popular among tourists who often visit this place, being the most attractive for scuba divers who are exploring its depths. Divers are also attracted with plenty of rare animal species and forms of life which can be found only in this place. Diavik Mine (Canada) The Diavik Diamond Mine is about 300 kilometers (186 miles) north of Yellowknife in Canada. The Burning Gates (Turkmenistan) In the heart of the Karakum desert of Turkmenistan, the Darvaza Gas Crater or The Burning Gates give off a glow that can be seen from miles away during the dark night. Glory Hole, Monticello Dam (California – US) Bingham Canyon Mine (Utah – US)

10 Most Fascinating Castles and Palaces The Potala Palace: Tibet's greatest monumental structure Perched upon Marpo Ri hill, 130 meters above the Lhasa valley, the Potala Palace rises a further 170 meters and is the greatest monumental structure in all of Tibet. In 637 Emperor Songtsen Gampo decided to build this palace on a hill, and the structure stood until the seventeenth century, when it was incorporated into the foundations of the greater buildings still standing today. Mont Saint-Michel: a Medieval Castle on a Small Island Mont St Michel France is situated on a quasi-island on the Normandy coast, near Brittany, which at high tide is almost entirely separated from the mainland. Predjamski Castle: Integrated in a Cave Every castle in the world is unique in some way, no two are the same, but this one --even though it's rather small and humble compared to some-- is probably the only one in the world who is integrated in a cave, precisely the second largest cave system in Slovenia.

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