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12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins

12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins
12 of the World’s Most Mysterious Monuments & Ruins Article by Steph, filed under Abandoned Places in the Architecture category. Around the world, in places as diverse as Homestead, Florida and Yonaguni, Japan stand monuments and ruins whose origins are shrouded in mystery. Nobody knows exactly why Stonehenge was built, how a set of manmade ruins came to be submerged deep in the ocean or who commissioned a giant carved granite set of post-apocalyptic instructions for rebuilding society on a remote hill in Georgia. Monumental Instructions for the Post-Apocalypse (images via: Wired) On a barren knoll in northeastern Georgia stands one of the world’s most bizarre and mysterious monuments. Lake Michigan Stonehenge (image via: io9) A group of researchers using sonar to look for shipwrecks at the bottom of Lake Michigan got quite a surprise when they found what appears to be an ancient Stonehenge-like structure 40 feet beneath the surface of the water. Underwater Ruins in Japan (images via: Hottnez)

http://weburbanist.com/2009/05/12/12-of-the-worlds-most-mysterious-monuments-ruins/

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The Mysterious Dancing Forest of Kaliningrad Located on the thin Curonian Spit that splits the Curonian Lagoon from the Baltic Sea, lies one of the strangest natural phenomena on Earth. Known as the Dancing Forest by caretakers of Curonian Spit National Park and as the Drunken Forest, by locals, this unusual pine forest is made of trees of various shapes, most of them twisted in circles and spirals, along the ground. According to tourists, the Dancing Forest looks more like a site near Chernobyl, with 20-year-old pines tied into natural knots and loops, like lumpy contortionists. A few years ago, the park manager invited students from local universities to conduct studies, and get to the bottom of the mystery. This free online encyclopedia has achieved what Wikipedia can only dream of The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy may be the most interesting website on the internet. Not because of the content—which includes fascinating entries on everything from ambiguity to zombies—but because of the site itself. Its creators have solved one of the internet’s fundamental problems: How to provide authoritative, rigorously accurate knowledge, at no cost to readers. It’s something the encyclopedia, or SEP, has managed to do for two decades.

Everything Ages Fast (Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, and Skype) — Illusion 360 - The World's most amazing Art, Design, Technology and Video These posters are part of an ad campaign entitled “Everything Ages Fast,” designed by Moma Propaganda and created for client Maximidia Seminars Link via Laughing Squid

Without borders... The 100 most beautiful places in the world The 100 most beautiful places in the world (click a screenshot to enlarge it) - 1 - The inca city of Machu Picchu country : Peru place : near Cuzco - 2 - The Iguazu waterfalls country : Argentina - Brazil place : borders between the two countries - 3 - The Tadj Mahall country : India place : Agra, south-west of Delhi - 4 - The pyramids and the sphinx country : Egypt place : Giseh, south-west of Cairo - 5 - The great canyon of Colorado country : United States of America place : south-west of the country, Arizona state

The Other Mystery of Easter Island Moai statues Easter Island is branded into popular consciousness as the home of the mysterious and towering moai statues, but these are not the only curiosity the South Pacific island holds. Where the moai are fascinating for their unknown purpose and mysterious craftsmen, the island's lost language of Rongorongo is equally perplexing. The unique written language seems to have appeared suddenly in the 1700s, but within just two centuries it was exiled to obscurity.

Everything You Need to Know About “Click and Drag” If you’re a regular reader of the brilliant xkcd, then you probably got lost in today’s comic, “Click and Drag.” It features three short panels sitting above a seemingly larger, finite panel. However, when you perform the comic’s titular action, click and drag, the larger, bottom panels seems to sprawl on forever in various directions, revealing amusing quips, sad stories, and what is essentially an entire world.

OLED Display, Low Energy Light, Revolutionary ‘light Emitting Wallpaper’ Could Start To Replace Light Bulbs In 2012 Carbon Trust backs organic LED lighting technology that promises major carbon cuts A company developing ultra-efficient organic LED (OLED) lighting technology has been awarded a £454k grant by the Carbon Trust. The OLED materials, being pioneered by LOMOX Ltd, have a wide variety of potential applications and when coated onto a film could be used to cover walls creating a light-emitting wallpaper which replaces the need for traditional light bulbs. As well as being flexible, OLED film will require a very low operating voltage (between 3 to 5 volts) so it can be powered by solar panels and batteries making it ideal for applications where mains power is not available such as roadside traffic warning signs.

Jabuticaba The Jabuticaba (Portuguese pronunciation: [ʒabutiˈkabɐ or ʒabutʃiˈkabɐ]) (Plinia cauliflora) is a fruit-bearing tree in the family Myrtaceae native to Minas Gerais and São Paulo states in southeastern Brazil. Related species in the genus Myrciaria, often referred to by the same common name, are native to Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, and Bolivia. The tree is grown for its purplish-black, white-pulped fruits; they can be eaten raw or be used to make jellies and drinks (plain juice or wine). Other common names include Brazilian Grape Tree, Jaboticaba, Jabotica, Jabuticabeira, Guaperu, Guapuru, Hivapuru, Sabará and Ybapuru (Guarani).

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