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How to Apply Design Thinking in Class, Step By Step

By Anne Stevens For educators ready to try the idea of design thinking, you’ll be glad to know it does not require extensive transformation of your classroom. That said, it can be a transformative experience for all involved. Here, we try to answer your questions about integrating different components of a design learning experience into familiar, pre-existing scenarios that play out in every school. Can my classroom become a space of possibility? For students, the best classroom experience is a space of possibility. It can be challenging to transition a traditional classroom into a space of possibility. But in a classroom that is a space of possibility, the students have agency, and the products and processes can be moving targets. Can I run a design thinking classroom on Tuesdays from 1-3pm? You can run a flexible studio space in your classroom for a certain part of the day. I am not a designer. The first place to seek the curriculum is in your classroom’s daily activities. Related:  Creativity & Service DesignLieux

Design Thinking Comes of Age Executive Summary In large organizations, design is moving closer to the center of the enterprise. This shift isn’t about aesthetics and product development, however. It’s about imparting the principles of design—collectively known as design thinking—throughout the organization. The approach is in large part a response to the complexity of many products, services, and processes. Design thinking is an essential tool for simplifying and humanizing. Creating a design-centric culture requires understanding that the returns on an investment in design are difficult to quantify, allowing people to take chances, and appreciating what design can and cannot achieve. HBR Reprint R1509D There’s a shift under way in large organizations, one that puts design much closer to the center of the enterprise. A version of this article appeared in the September 2015 issue (pp.66–71) of Harvard Business Review.

What Does ‘Design Thinking’ Look Like in School? Getty Images Design thinking can seem a bit abstract to teachers. It’s not part of traditional teacher training programs and has only recently entered the teachers’ vernacular. Design thinking is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, conceiving original ideas, lots of experimentation, and sometimes building things by hand. But at the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., a small, private school for grades K-8, design thinking is part of every class and subject, and has been integrated throughout the curriculum with support from a dedicated Innovation Lab or the iLab. “It’s really a way to make people more effective and to supercharge their innate capabilities,” said Kim Saxe, director of Nueva’s iLab, and one of the champions of design thinking. At Nueva, students are asked to bring the principles of design to every problem, no matter what age or grade. [RELATED: What Do Wii Remotes Have to Do With Science?]

Why Human-Centered Design Matters In 1894, W.K. Kellogg made a discovery that would forever change what we eat in the morning. Seeking a more digestible breakfast alternative to baked bread for his brother’s hospital patients, the bespectacled former broom salesman accidentally left a pot of boiled wheat out overnight. The wheat became softened and when he rolled it out and baked it, each grain became a crispy flake. Kellogg tried the technique on corn. But Kellogg didn’t stop there. Kellogg’s genius came not just in his flair for food product invention, but also in his customer-centric approach, iterative prototyping process and careful consideration of the entire product experience — from the cereal itself to its packaging, marketing and distribution. One misconception that I am still surprised to hear around Silicon Valley is that design is about making a product pretty — that it’s about designing the cereal box. Get out From Behind Your Desk To stay innovative you need to stay inspired. Make User Feedback Routine

LIFE IS A SERIOUS GAME | 10 conseils pour concevoir sa salle de créativité idéale | Blog facilitation, créativité, méthodes collaboratives, travail collaboratif, innovation, animation réunion Recevez un extrait de notre guide de survie aux réunions pour transformer vos réunions en moments funs et productifs ! Voilà notre nouveau cheval de bataille, les salles de créativité… nous travaillons dur avec Sacha pour mettre sur pied une offre de conseil dans le design de salle de créativité, et nous vous en reparlerons probablement plus en détail très prochainement pour vous demander votre avis. Mais avant cela, laissez nous vous partager notre veille sur ce sujet et les quelques conseils que vous déjà appliquer pour transformer vos salles de réunions classiques. Nous sommes convaincus que le prolongement naturel de nos méthodes collaboratives et en particulier celle qui touche à la créativité se situe dans l’environnement dans lequel elles se pratiquent. Certains disent qu’en soi, une salle de créativité dédiée traduit une certaine anomalie argumentant le fait que la créativité est l’affaire de tous et que celle-ci s’incarne dans tous les espaces de travail de l’entreprise.

100 User Experience Design & Evaluation Methods for Your Toolkit OK, we’re only at number 19 so far, there’s still a way to go. Still, what’s there so far suggests it’ll be an amazing series. As the site doesn’t make it easy to see all of the methods so far, here’s a list of what’s there to date: Each method comes with discussion of the strengths and weaknesses, as well as other resources. The list was started in January 2011, so we’ve probably got a while to go until we get the full list (6 months, eh?), but it’s certainly worth keeping an eye on. Vicky Teinaki An England-based Kiwi, Vicky is doing a PhD at Northumbria University into how designers can better talk about touch and products.

Can Design Thinking Help Schools Find New Solutions to Old Problems? Principal Kamar Samuels had a problem: how to reach the most disaffected students at Bronx Writing Academy, a middle school serving mostly low-income students. The usual discipline methods weren’t working and Samuels knew that if he could figure out how to engage his toughest students, he’d have a playbook to reach them all. So, he decided to make those students his focus group, asking them what they liked about school, and really listened to the answers. That technique is part of a user-centered design approach he’s trying out in order to tackle some of the age-old problems in education, like low achievement for Latino and African-American boys, with a new lens. “In education we do not typically engage our users — our students — to find what is causing them to be disengaged,” Samuels said. The kids weren’t accustomed to adults listening to them seriously. “Kids were spending the shortest period of time in the things they like the most,” Samuels said. iZONE DESIGN THINKING TOOLKIT

Can Design Thinking Help Schools Find New Solutions to Old Problems? Principal Kamar Samuels had a problem: how to reach the most disaffected students at Bronx Writing Academy, a middle school serving mostly low-income students. The usual discipline methods weren’t working and Samuels knew that if he could figure out how to engage his toughest students, he’d have a playbook to reach them all. So, he decided to make those students his focus group, asking them what they liked about school, and really listened to the answers. That technique is part of a user-centered design approach he’s trying out in order to tackle some of the age-old problems in education, like low achievement for Latino and African-American boys, with a new lens. “In education we do not typically engage our users — our students — to find what is causing them to be disengaged,” Samuels said. The kids weren’t accustomed to adults listening to them seriously. “Kids were spending the shortest period of time in the things they like the most,” Samuels said. iZONE DESIGN THINKING TOOLKIT

Remake Your Class: 6 Steps to Get Started At my design consultancy, TheThirdTeacher+, we believe that, whether it is a large-scale transformation or a small-scale hack, redesigning your classroom is a fun and empowering adventure. When you involve your students, colleagues and community, you can create a powerful conversation about the role of the environment in the student learning experience. We worked with Edutopia, a collection of creative collaborators and volunteers to help Steve Mattice, a math teacher at Roosevelt Middle School, reimagine his classroom. Here are the steps that can help you get started today. 1. Remaking your physical environment is an exciting way to transform your teaching practice and your students' learning experience. 2. After giving yourself the permission to playfully begin, it's time to discover. Reflect on the status quo: Grab a pen and post-its. 3. Remaking your class can happen at any scale. 4. 5. With clear priorities identified, your next step is making it all happen. 6.

6 pasos para resolver problemas en el aula con la metodología Design Thinking Cuando hablamos de “Design Thinking” nos referimos a un proceso que busca la innovación en cualquier proceso (ya sea en el marco de una empresa, de un colegio, o en cualquier otro entorno), cuya finalidad es responder a las necesidades de las personas que conviven en ese entorno y que utiliza la tecnología y el diseño como base para conseguir lograr sus objetivos. Para ponerlo en práctica podemos identificar en él seis pasos fundamentales. Son los siguientes: Observación. En este primer momento se busca identificar las necesidades de los usuarios mediante la observación directa. Comprensión. Definición. Ideación. Prototipación. Probar. El Design Thinking implica una serie de valores que a su vez tienen un gran valor dentro de la escuela. Ser visual frente a ser teórico. y además hacerlo con una mayor intensidad y motivación, frente a la simple presentación de un texto escrito. Iterar. Ser multidisciplinar. Aplaza las decisiones críticas. Enséñales a crear de manera conjunta.

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