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The Story of Us: Intro — Wait But Why This is society. Now let’s zoom in on the left arm. Further. Okay see those skin flaps on the elbow? Let’s zoom in on the bottom one. Immigration Timeline - The Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island By the 1880's, steam power had shortened the journey to America dramatically. Immigrants poured in from around the world: from the Middle East, the Mediterranean, Southern and Eastern Europe, and down from Canada. The door was wide open for Europeans. The Man Who Documented Native American Cultures Edward Sheriff Curtis The Man Who Documented Native American Cultures by Chris Nelson

Why we hate Complexity Natural and social systems are complex — that is, not entirely knowable, unpredictable, resistant to cause-and-effect analysis, in a word, mysterious. For our first three million years on Earth we humans, like every other species on the planet, accepted that mystery. We adapted rather than trying to change our environment. Image and Data Resources Open Access Policy The Metropolitan Museum of Art creates, organizes, and disseminates a broad range of digital images and data that document the rich history of the Museum, its collection, exhibitions, events, people, and activities. Images of artworks in the Museum's collection fall into two categories: 'As happy as a clam' - the meaning and origin of this phrase What's the meaning of the phrase 'As happy as a clam'? Very happy and content. What's the origin of the phrase 'As happy as a clam'?

SoJust.net: Social Justice and Civil Rights Speeches Bella AbzugPlenary Address, Fourth World Congress on Women (1995) John AdamsInaugural Address (1797) Jane AddamsThe Subjective Necessity for Social Settlements (1892)The Modern Lear (1896) Susan B. Bringing PEACE to the Classroom One of the most intriguing, and perhaps intimidating, aspects of walking into a class for the first time and introducing yourself is deciding who you will be. The teaching persona you present to your students on that first day of class will set the tone for the rest of the semester. As teachers, we get to consciously decide who we will be in the classroom. The creation of our teaching personas deserves careful consideration and is something I frequently discuss with my graduate students prior to their first teaching opportunity. In reflecting on the evolution of my teaching persona over the last two decades, and in discussing how my colleagues have developed and refined their own teaching personas, I offer an overarching recommendation for the basic elements of a teaching persona that will enhance the engagement of the teachers and students and contribute to a vibrant community of teachers and learners in the classroom. Preparation.

Simone de Beauvoir Simone-Lucie-Ernestine-Marie Bertrand de Beauvoir, commonly known as Simone de Beauvoir (French: [simɔn də bovwaʁ]; 9 January 1908 – 14 April 1986), was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist and social theorist. She did not consider herself a philosopher but she had a significant influence on both feminist existentialism and feminist theory.[1] Beauvoir wrote novels, essays, biographies, an autobiography and monographs on philosophy, politics and social issues. She is best known for her novels, including She Came to Stay and The Mandarins, as well as her 1949 treatise The Second Sex, a detailed analysis of women's oppression and a foundational tract of contemporary feminism.

Home: Art Images for College Teaching Art Images for College Teaching (AICT) began as a personal project dedicated to the principle of free exchange of image resources for and among members of the educational community. The University of Michigan Library provides access to this collection for educational and research purposes. Allan T. Kohl, the creator of this collection, has dedicated any copyright he might hold in the collection to the public domain, via the CC0 1.0 Public Domain Dedication. While the images in this collection are believed to be of public domain works, there is a remote possibility that secondary works still in copyright may have been incidentally documented as well.

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