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5 Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News : NPR Ed

5 Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News : NPR Ed
Students in Scott Bedley's fifth-grade class at Plaza Vista School in Irvine, Calif., play a version of "Simon Says" with fake news. Courtesy of Scott Bedley hide caption toggle caption Courtesy of Scott Bedley Students in Scott Bedley's fifth-grade class at Plaza Vista School in Irvine, Calif., play a version of "Simon Says" with fake news. As the national attention to fake news and the debate over what to do about it continue, one place many are looking for solutions is in the classroom. Since a recent Stanford study showed that students at practically all grade levels can't determine fake news from the real stuff, the push to teach media literacy has gained new momentum. Teachers are taking up the challenge to change that. Fake news "Simon Says" In Scott Bedley's version of Simon Says, it's not those two magic words that keep you in the game, but deciding correctly whether a news story is real or not. 1. Subtle changes Let them eat fake (news) Thing is, it never happened. Extra layers

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/02/16/514364210/5-ways-teachers-are-fighting-fake-news

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Episode 63: Late-Night Icon David Letterman and Songwriter Jason Isbell Our privacy promise The New Yorker's Strongbox is designed to let you communicate with our writers and editors with greater anonymity and security than afforded by conventional e-mail. When you visit or use our public Strongbox server at The New Yorker and our parent company, Condé Nast, will not record your I.P. address or information about your browser, computer, or operating system, nor will we embed third-party content or deliver cookies to your browser. Strongbox servers are under the physical control of The New Yorker and Condé Nast. Strongbox is designed to be accessed only through a “hidden service” on the Tor anonymity network, which is set up to conceal both your online and physical location from us and to offer full end-to-end encryption for your communications with us. This provides a higher level of security and anonymity in your communication with us than afforded by standard e-mail or unencrypted Web forms.

Dissent is Patriotic – The Codex Yesterday was the Day of Remembrance, the 75th anniversary of the Japanese American internment during World War II. In remembrance, artists commemorated the experience, communities gathered in solidarity, and families shared their stories. Earlier on January 30, 2017, Google Doodle honored the 98th birthday of Fred Korematsu—a civil rights icon and face of the Korematsu v. United States (1944) Supreme Court case that questioned the constitutionality of the WWII Japanese American internment.

Identifying Fake News: An Infographic and Educator Resources - EasyBib Blog We recently posted, “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article,” which highlighted key items to look for on a website when determining its credibility. The infographic found here summarizes the content from the blog post and students can use it as a guide when using news sources in research. Post, print, or share it with your students or others! Covering the White House: “Who Ya Gonna Believe?” - The New Yorker Radio Hour The media’s relationship with a President has never been more contentious than in this Administration. Journalists are struggling to keep up with hard-to-believe news and what Kellyanne Conway described as the “alternative facts,” also called lies, by official sources. Ben Smith, the editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed, walks David Remnick through his decision to publish an unverified dossier that alleges Donald Trump’s secret ties to Russia. Critics argued that BuzzFeed’s “decide for yourself” attitude toward publication undermines the public’s trust in the media at this precarious moment.

Fake news. It's complicated. - First Draft News This article is available also in Deutsch, Español, Français and العربية By now we’ve all agreed the term “fake news” is unhelpful, but without an alternative, we’re left awkwardly using air quotes whenever we utter the phrase. The reason we’re struggling with a replacement is because this is about more than news, it’s about the entire information ecosystem. And the term fake doesn’t begin to describe the complexity of the different types of misinformation (the inadvertent sharing of false information) and disinformation (the deliberate creation and sharing of information known to be false).

UW class on how to spot fake data goes viral within hours Two University of Washington professors are taking aim at BS in a provocatively named new course they hope to teach this spring. The professors would like to push the course materials online — teaching it as a MOOC, for example, a freely available course taught over the web. When it came to picking a title for the course they will teach this spring, University of Washington professors Carl Bergstrom and Jevin West decided to abandon academic stodginess and get edgy.

Commentary: It’s Facebook’s algorithm vs. democracy, and so far the algorithm is winning — NOVA Next Over the last several years, Facebook has been participating—unintentionally—in the erosion of democracy. The social network may feel like a modern town square, but thanks to its tangle of algorithms, it’s nothing like the public forums of the past. The company determines, according to its interests and those of its shareholders, what we see and learn on its social network. The result has been a loss of focus on critical national issues, an erosion of civil disagreement, and a threat to democracy itself. Facebook is just one part—though a large part—of the Big Data economy, one built on math-powered applications that are based on choices made by fallible human beings. Why Spatial Reasoning Is Crucial For Early Math Education When Nicole Thomson first heard about the importance of teaching spatial reasoning and geometry in her kindergarten math curriculum she had already been teaching for several years. Her teacher training program hadn’t mentioned these skills, and yet at a professional development session for math teachers a group of researchers from the University of Toronto explained the large body of research that ties spatial reasoning skills to future success in math and reading. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) recommends that spatial reasoning should be a large focus of preK – 8th grade math education.

10 Ways to Search Google for Information That 96% of People Don’t Know About In our era of advanced technology and high-speed Internet connections, you can find information on virtually anything. In the space of just a few minutes, we can find recipes for the tastiest pie or learn all about the theory of wave-particle duality. But more often than not, we have to sift through a vast body of knowledge to get the information we need, and this can take hours rather than minutes. This is why Bright Side has put together a list of the most effective methods for searching Google to help you find the precious material you’re looking for in just a couple of clicks. 1. Either this or that

Fake News Skip to main content Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda This guide offers a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it, and reading the news with a more informed eye A Visual Take Library Resources Donald Trump Cuts Library Funding - Institute of Museums and Library Services FundingCut When you introduce yourself as a librarian at a dinner party — as I have been doing for my whole adult life — you usually receive one of two responses: either the dreaded “But wait … aren’t libraries, like … dying? Because of Google?” or the well-intentioned, but gently incorrect “You must love books, huh?”

Trustworthy advice for a post-truth world - University of Alberta How do you tell fact from fiction in an online world where fake news often seems like the real thing? When the Oxford English Dictionary picked “post-truth” as word of the year for 2016, it seemed to signal a shift in the way we perceive the world—the triumph of emotional response over rational thought. But our susceptibility to “fake news” is not a new problem. It goes back at least as far as the 1890s, when the term “yellow journalism” emerged in the New York newspaper wars to denote a brand of sensational reporting more interested in circulation than accuracy.

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