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Hyperborea

Hyperborea
Area north of Thrace in Greek mythology In Greek mythology the Hyperboreans (Ancient Greek: Ὑπερβόρε(ι)οι, pronounced [hyperbóre(ː)ɔi̯]; Latin: Hyperborei) were a race of giants who lived "beyond the North Wind". The Greeks thought that Boreas, the god of the North Wind (one of the Anemoi, or "Winds") lived in Thrace, and therefore Hyperborea indicates that it is a region beyond Thrace. This land was supposed to be perfect, with the sun shining twenty-four hours a day, which to modern ears suggests a possible location within the Arctic Circle during the midnight sun-time of year. However, it is also possible that Hyperborea had no real physical location at all, for according to the classical Greek poet Pindar, neither by ship nor on foot would you find the marvellous road to the assembly of the Hyperboreans. Pindar also described the otherworldly perfection of the Hyperboreans: Never the Muse is absent from their ways: lyres clash and flutes cry and everywhere maiden choruses whirling. John G.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperborea

Related:  Geografia fantastica e dello spiritoMythology

Thule In classical and medieval literature, ultima Thule (Latin "farthermost Thule") acquired a metaphorical meaning of any distant place located beyond the "borders of the known world".[5] By the Late Middle Ages and early modern period, the Greco-Roman Thule was often identified with the real Iceland or Greenland. Sometimes Ultima Thule was a Latin name for Greenland, when Thule was used for Iceland.[6] By the late 19th century, however, Thule was frequently identified with Norway.[7][8]

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