background preloader

Danny Dorling: Maps that show us who we are (not just where we are)

Danny Dorling: Maps that show us who we are (not just where we are)
Related:  11 & 12 GEOGRAPHYTEDx - 4Maps

World Migration Map - Data Visualization by Metrocosm This map shows the estimated net immigration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015. Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people. Hover over a circle to see that country’s total net migration between 2010 and 2015. Country-to-country net migration (2010-2015) The data for this map comes from the U.N. Full screen version / Youtube video Immigration: the new Godwin’s Law If you’re not familiar with Godwin’s law, it is an old internet adage that states, “As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazism or Hitler approaches 1.” Lately, I’ve found a similar principle applies to immigration. Immigration has always been an important and frequently debated issue. Why is immigration suddenly the cause / result / solution of everything? Who is migrating from where to where? Syria The United Kingdom / Brexit Australia Credit

What are you revealing online? Much more than you think What can be guessed about you from your online behavior? Two computer privacy experts — economist Alessandro Acquisti and computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck — on how little we know about how much others know. The best indicator of high intelligence on Facebook is apparently liking a page for curly fries. At least, that’s according to computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck (TED Talk: The curly fry conundrum), whose job is to figure out what we reveal about ourselves through what we say — and don’t say — online. Of course, the lines between online and “real” are increasingly blurred, but as Golbeck and privacy economist Alessandro Acquisti (TED Talk: Why privacy matters) both agree, that’s no reason to stop paying attention. I hear so much conflicting information about what I should and shouldn’t be posting online. Alessandro Acquisti: My personal view is that individual responsibility is important, but we are at a stage where it is not sufficient. Jennifer Golbeck: I agree with that.

World Population Cube - Views of the World Last November’s theme of the Super Science Saturday at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History was Planet Earth. As part of the activities I contributed a map cube which I created a few years ago.Cubic globes are not a new idea. They put a nice twist to showing just a simple map, and more importantly, they allow for some activity which get the kids involved just as much as adults. A cube is much less work than creating a spheric version of Earth, and (as said by Carlos Furuti on his online cube globe collection) the cube is an ideal introduction to folding one’s own pseudoglobes. (view larger image – download as pdf) Now go, print out this template, craft your own cube, take a photo of it and post it on Twitter, Instagram and/or Facebook with the hashtag #mapcube. Meanwhile, here are some more impressions from the Super Science Saturday event (courtesy of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History): The content on this page has been created by Benjamin D.

Four Corners 50 Years - Home Welcome to a celebration of 50 years of ABC Television’s premier News and Current Affairs program, Four Corners. This website is a celebration of our history, which is not only TV programs, it is the successful collaboration of people: executive producers, reporters, researchers, editors, producers, crews and administrators, all of whom have played a significant role in the program’s history, identity and success, from 1961 to the present day. Four Corners’ reports have explored cultural and social change, political upheaval, conflicts, disasters and terrorism, with an eye on national and international events. This website will showcase the key stories, people and events we have covered over the past 50 years, and will stand as a living archive to five decades of vigorous reporting on ABC TV. You can explore our vast archive of programs by decade or by theme. The website also presents extended interviews with reporters, executive reporters, researchers and cameramen.

7 lessons about finding the work you were meant to do Emily Pidgeon Whether it was during a career aptitude test or in a heart-to-heart chat after getting laid off, chances are someone has talked to you about how to “find your calling.” It’s one of those phrases people toss about. But StoryCorps founder Dave Isay takes issue with it … specifically, the verb. “Finding your calling — it’s not passive,” he says. In other words, you don’t just “find” your calling — you have to fight for it. Over a decade of listening to StoryCorps interviews, Isay noticed that people often share the story of how they discovered their calling — and now, he’s collected dozens of great stories on the subject into a new book, Callings: The Purpose and Passion of Work. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

This map of Earth is the most accurate ever produced, and it looks completely different | indy100 Japanese architect Hajime Narukawa claims to have tackled a centuries-old problem - how to draw an oblate spheroid Earth on a flat plane. He claims the above map, called the AuthaGraph World Map, achieves this task. The projection, first created in 1999, frames the world's physical components in a 2D rectangle, attempting to represent their relative sizes as accurately as possible. It does so by dividing the world into 96 triangles, making it a tetrahedron, then unfolding it to become a rectangle. Picture: Authograph/Hajime Narukawa Unlike the traditional Mercator map, made in the 16th century, which overstates the size of northern areas like Greenland and minimizes that of central areas like Africa, the AuthaGraph World Map retains parity of area to a 3D projection. The projection recently won the 2016 good design grand award in Japan, an awards evening founded in 1957 by the Japanese ministry of international trade and industry. Narukawa also gave a Ted talk on his projection in 2011:

2015 Gates Annual Letter There is overwhelming evidence that people care about others who are suffering—when they can see the suffering. Just think of the global outpouring of support whenever a devastating tsunami or earthquake makes the news. The problem is that ongoing tragedies like deadly diseases and poverty don’t make the news. We hope to help change that. It is called Global Citizen, and you can sign up at globalcitizen.org. Global citizens have an especially important role to play this year. We hope the goals adopted this year continue that work.

This is your brain on communication Imagine that a device was invented which could record all of my memories, dreams and ideas, and then transmit the entire contents to your brain. Sounds like a game-changing invention, right? In fact, we already possess such a technology — it’s called effective storytelling. Human lives revolve around our ability to share information and experiences, and as a scientist, I’m fascinated by how our brains process interpersonal communication. Through the work in my lab, we believe we’ve uncovered two of the hidden neural mechanisms that enable us the exchange : 1) during communication, soundwaves uttered by the speaker couple the listener’s brain responses with the speaker’s brain responses; 2) our brains have developed a common neural protocol that allows us to use such brain coupling to share information. In one experiment, we brought people to the fMRI scanner and scanned their brains while they were either telling or listening to real-life stories. So, we experimented.

More Accurate World Map Wins Prestigious Design Award The most accurate map you'll ever see. You probably won't like it. Authagraph You probably don’t realize it, but virtually every world map you’ve ever seen is wrong. The world maps we’re all used to operate off of the Mercator projection, a cartographic technique developed by Flemish geographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. To correct these distortions, Tokyo-based architect and artist Hajime Narukawa created the AuthaGraph map over the course of several years using a complex process that essentially amounts to taking the globe (more accurate than any Mercator map) and flattening it out: Narukawa’s process indeed succeeded in creating a map that no longer shrinks Africa, enlarges Antarctica, or minimizes the vastness of the Pacific — and the list goes on. In recognition of Narukawa’s success, he’s now beaten out thousands of other contestants to receive this year’s Grand Award from Japan’s Good Design Awards, and his map is featured in textbooks for Japanese schoolchildren.

Related: