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Why Understanding These Four Types of Mistakes Can Help Us Learn

Why Understanding These Four Types of Mistakes Can Help Us Learn
by Eduardo Briceño This article was first published in the Mindset Works newsletter. We can deepen our own and our students’ understanding of mistakes, which are not all created equal, and are not always desirable. After all, our ability to manage and learn from mistakes is not fixed. We can improve it. Here are two quotes about mistakes that I like and use, but that can also lead to confusion if we don’t further clarify what we mean: “A life spent making mistakes is not only most honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing” – George Bernard Shaw “It is well to cultivate a friendly feeling towards error, to treat it as a companion inseparable from our lives, as something having a purpose which it truly has.” – Maria Montessori These constructive quotes communicate that mistakes are desirable, which is a positive message and part of what we want students to learn. Types of mistakes The stretch mistakes Stretch mistakes happen when we’re working to expand our current abilities.

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/11/23/why-understanding-these-four-types-of-mistakes-can-help-us-learn/

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We Are All Confident Idiots – Pacific Standard The trouble with ignorance is that it feels so much like expertise. A leading researcher on the psychology of human wrongness sets us straight. By David Dunning Last March, during the enormous South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas, the late-night talk show Jimmy Kimmel Live! sent a camera crew out into the streets to catch hipsters bluffing. “People who go to music festivals pride themselves on knowing who the next acts are,” Kimmel said to his studio audience, “even if they don’t actually know who the new acts are.” Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: The Do’s and Don’ts of Giving an Effective Presentation April 8, 2017 When it comes to presentations, no matter what industry you’re in, creating that first impression and providing a presentation that will win over your audience comes with its pressures. Standing in front of that audience and involving them in what you’re saying is important in the success of any presentation. If you have great content, your presentation has a great starting point for success and will help to give you confidence as a presenter. The content of your slides will set the scene of your presentation, where the words used really do matter.

Dunning–Kruger effect - Wikipedia The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which low-ability individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability as much higher than it really is. Psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger attributed this bias to a metacognitive incapacity, on the part of those with low ability, to recognize their ineptitude and evaluate their competence accurately. Their research also suggests corollaries: high-ability individuals may underestimate their relative competence and may erroneously assume that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others.[1] Dunning and Kruger have postulated that the effect is the result of internal illusion in those of low ability and external misperception in those of high ability: "The miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others."[1]

Enliven Class Discussions With Gallery Walks Students routinely talking with each other should be a staple in classrooms. We know this as teachers. Social development theory (and I’m sure plenty of your own observational data) backs up the benefits of it. Regardless of age, we know students need time with their peers to share, discuss, grab new ideas, build on ones they already have, and reflect. They can do this in pairs or triads, and it only takes a few minutes.

How to Make a Quiz Work Harder for You When you give a test or quiz, do you basically just grade it, give it back to students, go over the answers, then move on? If you don’t do anything else with the information, if you don’t look carefully at how students answer your test questions, you’re missing a BIG opportunity. Assessments should give us loads of information about what our students understand, what they don’t understand, and how well we’ve taught them. It took me years of teaching before I realized I was using my tests and quizzes to sort out, reward and punish my students, rather than measure and inform my teaching. I needed to make my assessments work harder for me.

How To Ensure Students Are Actively Engaged and Not Just Compliant Engagement is a crucial part of learning, but ensuring students are actively engaged is more complex than whether a student is paying attention or not. As technology has made its way into the classroom many educators describe how attentive students are when on devices, but a quiet, outwardly behaved student is not the same thing as one that is truly engaged. The kind of engagement that leads to learning is three dimensional.

Art Assessment Idea: Visualizing Growth My students, like all artists, face hurdles when it comes to drawing. When they envision something in their head, they are automatically disappointed when the image on their paper doesn’t reflect their vision perfectly. This disappointment can turn to frustration and can become more defeating the older a student gets. The engaged student vs. the compliant student The engaged student knows exactly why they are doing what they are doing while the compliant student is unable to connect the learning to anything meaningful. The engaged student is asking questions while the compliant student is simply receiving instructions and direction from the teacher. The engaged student is focused on learning while the compliant student wants to know how many points the activity is worth. The engaged student is able to track, monitor, and self-evaluate their learning while the compliant student is reliant upon the teacher to know where he/she is with their learning. The engaged student is making connections to the material and information beyond the four walls of the classroom while the compliant student is unable to see beyond the actual task itself.

Social media tips and tools FutureLearn is a social learning environment at its heart. To get the most out of it we recommend that you fill out your learner profile and add a photo so that other learners can get to know you a bit better. And did you know you can ‘follow’ other learners that you find interesting so you can find their comments more easily? What Does Student Engagement Look Like? Engagement. . .it’s another one of those words that’s regularly bandied about in higher education. We talk about it like we know what it means and we do, sort of. It’s just that when a word or idea is so widely used, thinking about it often stops and that’s what I think has happened with engagement.

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