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R.L. Stine

R.L. Stine
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Scott Westerfeld The Subtle Knife Plot summary[edit] Lyra revisits Dr. Malone the next day, but after accepting a ride from the well-dressed Sir Charles Latrom, she discovers that Sir Charles has stolen her alethiometer and she asks Will to help her retrieve it. Lyra and Will plan to steal back the alethiometer by using the knife. Mrs. Serafina goes to aid Scoresby, having heard his last plea for help, and Will encounters Grumman, who staunches the bleeding in his hand and instructs him in his task. This concludes the second novel, with the trilogy concluding in the next book, The Amber Spyglass. Critical reception[edit] Parents' Choice Gold Book Award; American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults; Booklist Editors' Choice; Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year; Horn Book Fanfare Honor Book; Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book; Book Links Best Book of the Year; American Bookseller Pick of the Lists Adaptations[edit] An audiobook adaptation, featuring a full cast and narration by the author, was released in 2002. [edit]

Shel Silverstein The Amber Spyglass The Amber Spyglass is the third and final novel in the His Dark Materials series, written by English author Philip Pullman, and published in 2000. The Amber Spyglass won the 2001 Whitbread Book of the Year award, a British literature award, making it the first children's novel to receive the honour.[1] It was named Children's Book of the Year at the 2001 British Book Awards, and was also longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, again the first time this had happened to a children's book.[2] Plot[edit] At the end of The Subtle Knife, Marisa Coulter captured Lyra. In Cittàgazze, two angels, Balthamos and Baruch, tell Will, the bearer of the Subtle Knife, that they are taking him to Lord Asriel. Three forces – Will, Iorek, and Balthamos; Lord Asriel's army; and the army of the Magisterium – converge on Mrs. "Lyra+Will" carved in the bench in the Oxford Botanic Garden. Lyra returns to Jordan College. Changes to U.S. edition[edit] The changed lines are italicized below: Chapter headings[edit]

Rick Riordan Nineteen Eighty-Four History and title[edit] A 1947 draft manuscript of the first page of Nineteen Eighty-Four, showing the editorial development. The Last Man in Europe was an early title for the novel but in a letter dated 22 October 1948 to his publisher Fredric Warburg, eight months before publication, Orwell wrote about hesitating between The Last Man in Europe and Nineteen Eighty-Four.[14] Warburg suggested changing the main title to a more commercial one.[15] Copyright status[edit] The novel will be in the public domain in the European Union and Russia in 2021 and in the United States in 2044.[21] It is already in the public domain in Canada;[22] South Africa,[23] Argentina[24] Australia,[25] and Oman.[26] Background[edit] The banner of the Party in the 1984 film adaptation of the book (I) the upper-class Inner Party, the elite ruling minority, who make up 2% of the population. As the government, the Party controls the population with four ministries: Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Principal characters[edit]

Terry Pratchett Larry Finlay, MD at Transworld Publishers: “I was deeply saddened to learn that Sir Terry Pratchett has died. The world has lost one of its brightest, sharpest minds. In over 70 books, Terry enriched the planet like few before him. As all who read him know, Discworld was his vehicle to satirize this world: he did so brilliantly, with great skill, enormous humour and constant invention. Terry faced his Alzheimer’s disease (an ‘embuggerance’, as he called it) publicly and bravely. My sympathies go out to Terry’s wife Lyn, their daughter Rhianna, to his close friend Rob Wilkins, and to all closest to him.” Terry passed away in his home, with his cat sleeping on his bed surrounded by his family on 12th March 2015. A Just Giving page donating to the Research Institute for the Care of Older People (RICE) has been set up in his memory:

Supernatural Fiction Supernatural fiction (properly, "supernaturalist fiction"[1]) is a literary genre exploiting or requiring as plot devices or themes some contradictions of the commonplace natural world and materialist assumptions about it. In its broadest definition, supernatural fiction includes examples of weird fiction, horror fiction, fantasy fiction, and such sub-genres as vampire literature and the ghost story. Elements of supernatural fiction can be found in writing from genres such as science fiction. Amongst academics, readers and collectors, however, supernatural fiction is often classed as a discrete genre defined by the elimination of "horror", "fantasy" and elements important to other genres.[1] The one genre supernatural fiction appears to embrace in its entirety is the traditional ghost story.[2] In the twentieth century, supernatural fiction became associated with psychological fiction. The result is that the supernatural is only one possible explanation for what has been described.

Darren Shan - Author of the Darren Shan Saga and The Demonata Artemis Fowl - Eoin Colfer This site uses some unobtrusive cookies to store information on your computer. Some cookies on this site are essential, and the site won't work as expected without them. These cookies are set when you submit a form, login or interact with the site by doing something that goes beyond clicking on simple links. We also use some non-essential cookies to anonymously track visitors or enhance your experience of the site. We also use some non-essential cookies to anonymously track visitors or enhance your experience of the site. To control third party cookies, you can also adjust your browser settings. By using our site you accept the terms of our Privacy Policy. (One cookie will be set to store your preference) (Ticking this sets a cookie to hide this popup if you then hit close. about this tool About Cookie Control

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