background preloader

Butterfly - The Secret Life of Chaos - BBC 4 Preview

Butterfly - The Secret Life of Chaos - BBC 4 Preview
Related:  Complexity TheoryComplexity

Zachman Framework The Zachman Framework of enterprise architecture The Zachman Framework is not a methodology in that it does not imply any specific method or process for collecting, managing, or using the information that it describes.;[2] rather, it is an Ontology whereby a schema for organizing architectural artifacts (in other words, design documents, specifications, and models) is used to take into account both whom the artifact targets (for example, business owner and builder) and what particular issue (for example, data and functionality) is being addressed.[3] The framework is named after its creator John Zachman, who first developed the concept in the 1980s at IBM. It has been updated several times since.[4] Overview[edit] The term "Zachman Framework" has multiple meanings. Collage of Zachman Frameworks as presented in several books on Enterprise Architecture from 1997 to 2005. The framework is a logical structure for classifying and organizing the descriptive representations of an enterprise.

What is Emergent Thinking? | David Brooks With rendition switcher David Brooks: Carl Popper, the great philosopher said, “All problems are either clouds or clocks.” A clock is a… to understand a clock, you can take it apart, it’s individual pieces and you study the pieces and then you can understand how a clock works. So an emergent system is something you only can study as a whole. So we’re surrounded by these patterns of interaction, these emergent systems. And so when you talk about a corporate culture or a marketplace or anything, it’s about the complex interplay of all these different things.

Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan - Microbial Microcosm Just how interconnected are we? The work of biologist Lynn Margulis and writer Dorion Sagan indicates we’re interconnected in ways few of us have probably ever considered. In fact, instead of viewing ourselves as the pinnacle of evolution, it may be more accurate to think of ourselves as a colony of closely associated bacteria. Carla Cole based the following on the work of Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan, including an article of theirs, The Parts: Power to the Protoctists, which appeared in the September/October 1992 issue of Earthwatch. All life on Earth today derived from common ancestors. Far from leaving microorganisms behind on an evolutionary ladder, we more complex creatures are both surrounded by them and composed of them. In the first two billion years of life on Earth, bacteria – the only inhabitants – continuously transformed the planet’s surface and atmosphere and invented all life’s essential, miniaturized chemical systems.

Underground ant city in Brazil that 'rivals the Great Wall of China' with a labyrinth of highways By Julian Gavaghan Updated: 16:51 GMT, 2 February 2012 A sophisticated underground ant city once populated by millions of insects has been discovered by a team of scientists. The abandoned megalopolis, which features vast subterranean highways, paths and gardens, was found buried beneath the earth in Brazil. It is thought to have housed one of the biggest ant colonies in the world. But no one is sure when the leafcutter species left and what caused their demise. Scroll down to watch the amazing video Underground city: The network of tunnels and dens built by millions of Leaf Cutter ants in Brazil Experts poured ten tonnes of concrete into holes on the surface – which served as air conditioning ducts for the ants – to expose the tunnels by solidifying in the space. It took ten days to pour the material down the labyrinth of channels, which covered an area of 500sq ft and extended to 26ft below the surface.. Vast: The Leaf Cutters are said to form the second most complex society after our own

Mimivirus Mimivirus is a viral genus containing a single identified species named Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV). It also refers to a group of phylogenetically related large viruses, designated usually "MimiN."[1] In colloquial speech, APMV is more commonly referred to as just "mimivirus." Mimivirus has a large and complex genome compared with most other viruses. Discovery[edit] The same team that discovered the mimivirus later discovered a slightly larger virus, dubbed the mamavirus, and the Sputnik virophage that infects it.[5] Classification[edit] Mimivirus has been placed into a viral family by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses as a member of the Mimiviridae,[6] and has been placed into Group I of the Baltimore classification system.[7] Although not strictly a method of classification, Mimivirus joins a group of large viruses known as nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV). Structure[edit] Genome[edit] Replication[edit] Pathogenicity[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

iecps       Institute of Studies of Complexity and Systems Thinking Vladimir Dimitrov IntroductionChaos and Complexity theory studies nonlinear processes: Chaos explores how complexly interwoven patterns of behaviour can emerge out of relatively simply-to-describe nonlinear dynamics, while Complexity tries to understand how relatively simply-to-describe patterns can emerge out of complexly interwoven dynamics. Both Chaos and Complexity build the core of Complexity Science actively promoted in the research publications of the Santa Fe Institute in USA established in 1984. A Historical OutlookChaos and Complexity emerge from non-linear mathematics. With their pioneering works on local stability (instability) of dynamical systems in the last decade of the 19 century, the Russian mathematicians Andrey Lyapunov and Sophia Kovalevskaya are viewed as the founders of the single and most creative and prolific stand of thought in the analysis of dynamic discontinuities and non-linearities up to the present day, the Russian School. I. II. III. IV. 1.

Babel | Sito bibliografico sull’opera di Edgar Morin Edgar Morin è uno dei maggiori filosofi contemporanei. Direttore emerito di ricerca al CNRS (Francia). Presidente dell'Associazione per il pensiero complesso (Parigi, Francia). Il progetto Babel intende raccogliere e presentare il vasto insieme delle sue pubblicazioni. Questo sito è realizzato e mantenuto da: CE.R.CO - Centro di ricerca sull'antropologia e l'epistemologia della complessitàUniversità degli studi di Bergamo Piazzale Sant'Agostino , 224129 – Bergamo - ItaliaDirettore: Mauro CerutiPresidente onorario: Edgar Morin

NetLogo Home Page NetLogo is a multi-agent programmable modeling environment. It is used by tens of thousands of students, teachers and researchers worldwide. It also powers HubNet participatory simulations. What can you do with NetLogo? Join mailing lists here. Download NetLogo Go to NetLogo Web NetLogo comes with a large library of sample models. Networks, Crowds, and Markets: A Book by David Easley and Jon Kleinberg In recent years there has been a growing public fascination with the complex "connectedness" of modern society. This connectedness is found in many incarnations: in the rapid growth of the Internet and the Web, in the ease with which global communication now takes place, and in the ability of news and information as well as epidemics and financial crises to spread around the world with surprising speed and intensity. These are phenomena that involve networks, incentives, and the aggregate behavior of groups of people; they are based on the links that connect us and the ways in which each of our decisions can have subtle consequences for the outcomes of everyone else. Networks, Crowds, and Markets combines different scientific perspectives in its approach to understanding networks and behavior. The book is based on an inter-disciplinary course that we teach at Cornell. You can download a complete pre-publication draft of Networks, Crowds, and Markets here.

On Early Warning Signs At a closed meeting held in Boston in October 2009, the room was packed with high-flyers in foreign policy and finance: Henry Kissinger, Paul Volcker, Andy Haldane, and Joseph Stiglitz, among others, as well as representatives of sovereign wealth funds, pensions, and endowments worth more than a trillion dollars—a significant slice of the world’s wealth. The session opened with the following telling question: “Have the last couple of years shown that our traditional finance/risk models are irretrievably broken and that models and approaches from other fields (for example, ecology) may offer a better understanding of the interconnectedness and fragility of complex financial systems?” Science is a creative human enterprise. Discoveries are made in the context of our creations: our models and hypotheses about how the world works. Examples of catastrophic and systemic changes have been gathering in a variety of fields, typically in specialized contexts with little cross-connection.

ISSS paper - 1999 This paper brought together a number of subjects, in an early, almost extended outline. The sections of this paper provide starting positions for several subjects that will be further explored in enterprisography. Full paper can be downloaded from here. This paper explores the subject of enterprise-wide information systems in terms of how they support business organizations as living, cognitive human social systems. It questions whether the autopoietic definition of living systems truly applies to human social systems, and it proposes a formal definition of the human social system, incorporating the notion of the meme. Keywords: information systems, enterprise cognition, autopoiesis, meme, human social system, business design This paper is an abbreviated, exploratory discussion of a conceptual framework for considering enterprise information systems. This paper can only begin to introduce the concepts that support a model of living enterprise information systems. Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

Holism Holism: Holism as an idea or philosophical concept is diametrically opposed to atomism. Where the atomist believes that any whole can be broken down or analyzed into its separate parts and the relationships between them, the holist maintains that the whole is primary and often greater than the sum of its parts. The atomist divides things up in order to know them better; the holist looks at things or systems in aggregate and argues that we can know more about them viewed as such, and better understand their nature and their purpose. The early Greek atomism of Leucippus and Democritus (fifth century B.C.) was a forerunner of classical physics. In the seventeenth century, at the same time that classical physics gave renewed emphasis to atomism and reductionism, Spinoza developed a holistic philosophy reminiscent of Parmenides. Hegel, too, had mystical visions of the unity of all things, on which he based his own holistic philosophy of nature and the state.

Related: