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How interpreters juggle two languages at once

How interpreters juggle two languages at once

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXNTArhA0Jg

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The amazing brains of the real-time interpreters One morning this summer I paid a visit to the sole United Nations agency in London. The headquarters of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) sits on the southern bank of the Thames, a short distance upstream from the Houses of Parliament. As I approached, I saw that a ship’s prow, sculpted in metal, was grafted like a nose to the ground floor of this otherwise bland building. Inside I met a dozen or so mostly female IMO translators.

FeedBack from the Field ... the Interpreter Speaks ... by Anastasia Antoniou MBA Welcome! FeedBack from the Field ... the Interpreter Speaks ... will be a collection of real stories from interpreters - an interpreter is someone who understands at least two languages and acts as a conduit between two or more people in order to facilitate communication. This clarification of the message, from language A to language B, is interpretation. An interpretation can take place in many settings and set of circumstances - anywhere where there are at least two people who want to communicate and need a third individual to skillfully utilize their command of both present languages in order to facilitate clear and accurate communication.

Language Blog Translation Times: Watch This: 4 Essential Interpreter Skills What does it take to be an interpreter? Well, we won't really have space to list everything here, so for the sake of brevity we'd like to point out a few key skills that, in our humble opinion, interpreters should have to be successful. These skills go beyond the obvious language skills, memory skills, etc. Glossary on Trade Financing Terms Glossary on Trade Financing Terms of the International Trade Centre (ITC) [a] [b] [c] [d] [e] [f] [g] [h] [i] [j] [k] [l] [m] [n] [o] [p] [q] [r] [s] [t] [u] [v] [w] [x] [y] [z] Glossaire des termes financiers et commerciaux du Centre du Commerce International (CCI) How To Make Your Own L.U.C.K. As A Translator And/Or Interpreter Have you ever wondered why some people always seem to be lucky? Whatever they do, they succeed. Sometimes without even trying.

¿Cómo comportarse en la cabina? Mutual assistance, team cohesiveness and convivialité are essential for the smooth running of any conference. Here's a checklist of booth manners for beginners. In the booth Remember that an interpreting booth is a confined space. Act accordingly;Keep the documents neat and orderly;Do not smoke; Switch off your mobile phone; Take care not to wear jewellery that can make a noise, like wrist bangles; Agree preferred seating and lighting arrangements with colleague(s); Turn volume right down on your headset if you leave the booth; Keep quiet when not working (microphones pick up all background noise so do not shuffle papers, be careful when pouring water, do not eat or make other unpleasant noises); Talk into the microphone (some colleagues who regularly work for TV can offer precious advice).

The role of interpreter is lost in translation The big picture (5 April) was good and the numbered captions helpful. It was a boost for our profession to have the man below the late King Abdullah’s portrait described as “perhaps the most important person in the room”. However, translators are not normally people who listen and speak (sometimes simultaneously) in meetings: that is the job of interpreters. Why consecutive learning is important? “Although I’m retired from the Commission now I still do a bit of training now and again and I sometimes get asked why students of conference interpreting on university interpretation courses spend so much of their time learning how to do consecutive interpreting when practically all the work they’ll do later as a conference interpreter- assuming they get that far- will consist of simultaneous interpreting..the difference as I’m sure most of you know being that consecutive (as the name suggests) is done after the speech, using among other things your memory and the notes you have taken during the speech to be interpreted whereas simultaneous is done in a soundproofed booth wearing head-phones while the speaker is talking..which is probably how most laymen see interpreters and also how most professional interpreters might see themselves. Should students learn CONS before SIM? Dick Fleming is a former staff conference interpreter and trainer at the European Commission, Brussels. Like this:

How we work You may already have seen or heard interpreters at work whispering for heads of state or interpreting in sound-proof booths at large international conferences. The ability to interpret is a skill many claim but few truly possess. Consider the process of interpretation: the interpreter listens to the speaker, understands the message and converts it into another language, speaks to the delegates and all the while monitors his output to ensure elegant delivery. And while this is happening the interpreter is absorbing the next part of the speech. What are the processes involved? It is essential to grasp that interpreting is first and foremost understanding the intended message perfectly.

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