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Brainstorm: Engelska – Kooperativt Lärande

https://kooperativt.com/2016/05/20/brainstorm-engelska/

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Collective Nouns Sheet 1 Nouns name people, places, or things. A collective noun refers to the names a group of people, places or things. Examples of collective nouns are as follows: hive, herd, fleet, nest, host, class, crew The subject of each sentence below is a collective noun. Underline the collective noun. Laying vs. Lying How many times have you looked up the difference between laying and lying? The fact is, it’s pretty difficult to remember how to use them. Here’s your chance to master it once and for all with some simple rules and helpful mnemonics. PBL on HUMAN RIGHTS Students’ final works! It was December 12th when I published the first post of our PBL on Human Rights and after 4 months of class and individual work we have now finished researching, selecting and collecting materials and it’s about time to see the students’ groups’ final works and oral presentations. I’m very proud of my students when watching and listening to them presenting their Prezis and Emazes I realize how much they have improved in these 4 (or 2 in the case of 3M) years together. It’s amazing the quality of some of their works that show a great deal of creativity and that was exactly what I aimed at.

10 Illustrated English Idioms That Will Make Your Life Easier For many people learning English for the first time it can be daunting and complex language to master. Lots of silent letters, complex spellings and odd expressions which often go over the heads of most non-English speakers. To make learning English a little easier, Irish illustrator Roisin Hahessy has created some wonderfully simple yet funny pictures to help make things a little clearer. She's also a part-time English teacher in Brazil so she uses the series to aid her students as well. Now whenever you hear any of these English idioms, thanks to Hahessy at least now you'll have a better idea of where the conversation is heading! Via Roisin Hahessy

Top 5 Most Frustrating Writing Mistakes (and How to Avoid Them) - Grammarly Blog Recently Grammarly asked its social media communities which writing mistakes were the worst kinds of errors. Our fans tend to find substantive grammatical trip-ups, like verb errors, far more frustrating than typographical errors and “stylistic” errors, such as homophone misspelling and preposition placement. Embed code for infographic at end of post.

Six ‘useless’ things foreign language teachers do Recasts Recasts are the most frequent form of feedback that teachers give students in the course of oral interactions. They consists of utterances by the teacher that repeat the student’s erroneous utterance but ‘fix’ the mistake(s) without changing the meaning in any way. 14 Expressions with Crazy Origins that You Would Never Have Guessed Guest post by Anais John You probably use tons of expressions, idioms, and slang phrases every day that don’t make literal sense. If you ever thought long and hard about why you say something a certain way, you could probably make a guess. However, some English expressions are so crazy and unusual that it is impossible to guess where on earth it originated from — unless you know the history. In case you didn’t know, historical events, legends, important figures, religion, and even advertisements form the basis of many expressions used today.

Activities for correcting writing in the language classroom How can teachers encourage learners to correct their own writing? Second-time winner of TeachingEnglish blog award, Cristina Cabal, offers a few tried and tested error-correction activities. Does every single writing error need to be corrected? In the learning of a second language, this is a question that stirs up great controversy.

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