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Russian mink farms where thousands are slaughtered and left to rot to make $1m coats

Russian mink farms where thousands are slaughtered and left to rot to make $1m coats
These disturbing pictures expose the macabre truth about the fur farms in Russia and China which supply the fashion market in the world's leading cities, including London, Paris and New York. Across ten time zones, the images show the reality of mink and sable gulags - many set up during the harsh Communist past - where prized animals are bred for slaughter, bringing in millions of pounds to the Russian economy every single year. An investigation by MailOnline also reveals the appalling conditions in which wild animals, including different types of fox, are captured and killed, from being skinned alive to being poisoned by the faeces in the air, and reveals the heartless farm owners who can't see beyond their profits. And there are certainly profits to be made: a sable 'blanket' sold for a record-breaking $900,000 to a royal just a few years ago, while a coat at last year's Fendi show was rumoured to have a price tag of $1.2million. Animals forced to suffer and starve in Russian fur farm

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3572756/Barbarity-Russian-mink-farms-thousands-slaughtered-make-1m-sable-coats-blankets-left-rot-stinking-corpse-mountain.html

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