background preloader

World War I - Trenches on the Web

World War I - Trenches on the Web
Related:  Primera Guerra MundialEurope

World War I - The History of World War I What Was World War I? World War I was an extremely bloody war that engulfed Europe from 1914 to 1919, with huge losses of life and little ground lost or won. Fought mostly by soldiers in trenches, World War I saw an estimated 10 million military deaths and another 20 million wounded. While many hoped that World War I would be "the war to end all wars," in actuality, the concluding peace treaty set the stage for World War II. Dates: 1914-1919 Also Known As: The Great War, WWI, the First World War The Start of World War I The spark that started World War I was the assassination of Austria's Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie. Although Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the nephew of Austria's emperor and heir-apparent to the throne, was not very well liked by most, his assassination by a Serb nationalist was viewed as a great excuse to attack Austria-Hungary's troublesome neighbor, Serbia. The calls for back-up didn't end there. Schlieffen Plan vs. A War of Attrition U.S.

A Guide to World War I Materials (Virtual Programs & Services, Library of Congress) Compiled by Kenneth Drexler, Digital Reference Specialist The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide variety of material related to World War I, including photographs, documents, newspapers, films, sheet music, and sound recordings. This guide compiles links to World War I resources throughout the Library of Congress Web site. Furthermore, as part of our commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the U.S. involvement in World War I, the Library of Congress has created a World War I portal to its extensive holdings on the subject of the war. Library of Congress Web Site | External Web Sites | Selected Bibliography American Leaders Speak: Recordings from World War I The Nation's Forum recordings were made between 1918 and 1920 in an effort to preserve the voices of prominent Americans; in most cases, they are the only surviving recordings of a speaker. American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936 to 1940 George S. John J. Finding Aids

Newspaper Pictorials: World War I Rotogravures, 1914-1919 This online collection is drawn from three primary sources: The War of the Nations: Portfolio in Rotogravure Etchings, a volume published by the New York Times shortly after the armistice that compiled selected images from their "Mid-Week Pictorial" supplements of 1914-19; Sunday rotogravure sections from the New York Times for 1914-19; and Sunday rotogravure sections from the New York Tribune for 1916-19. The War of Nations is particularly rich. This volume contains 1,398 rotogravure images with brief descriptive captions, broad organizational headings, and a table of contents; 32 maps that describe military engagements throughout the war; and a 3-page appendix that provides a chronology, statistics, treaty excerpts, and highlights of wartime events. Rotogravure collections were chosen for digitization since few quality originals exist in newspaper format due to paper deterioration.

Publicidad de Primera y Segunda Guerra Mundial Teaching European History With Star Trek | Milk and Cookies This post is the 2nd in a series written by my guest, Susan. Read part one: Teaching Ancient History With Star Trek. To Boldly Go…Into European History Of the three episodes that lend themselves well to approaching events in European history, two are among my very favorites. All Our Yesterdays Summary: Kirk, Spock, and McCoy are sent back in time. When to Watch: When studying 17th Century Witch Trials in Europe or America Vocabulary HenchmanAccomplice Questions and Activities The man called Kirk a slave. Wolf in the Fold Note for Parents: Just like the topic itself, this episode is not suitable for young children. Summary: Scotty is accused of multiples murders. When to Watch: When studying 1880′s England. HedonisticExpediteRegressive How does the environment on the planet mimic that of Victorian London? Trivia: Jack the Ripper was never arrest or convicted; the murders just stopped. Patterns of Force Summary: The Enterprise encounters a planet that has adopted the society of Nazi Germany. Subcutaneous

BBC News | World War I | The Great War: 80 years on Monday, November 2, 1998 Published at 14:42 GMT The Great War: 80 years on It is 80 years since the armistice silenced the guns of World War I. The war lasted from 1914-18, claimed 10 million lives and forever changed the political map of Europe. Using personal accounts and historical analysis BBC News Online looks back at what became known as "the war to end all wars". Archive radio interviews "There was nothing but brown earth, shell holes and death" Images and newsreelFootage and photographs from the battlefields. Letters home Soldiers revealed their hopes and fears in letters sent from the front. My grandfather's warBBC reporter Andrew Bell retraces his grandfather's movements on the western front.Your stories Email BBC News Online with your family stories or memories of World War I. Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage | ©

Ejercito Frances 1918 Castle Architecture Although castle architecture developed over the centuries in line with weapons technology, the principles remained much the same. A good castle provided a secure base that could be easily defended. It needed defenses against frontal attack (thick, high walls and secure entry gates) and from undermining (rock foundations or a moat). It furnished means of repelling attackers while minimising exposure of the defenders (arrow loops, crenellation, machicolations, murder holes). Further, it needed facilities to withstand a siege - a fresh water supply or large cistern and vast supplies of food. A good castle had no dead-spaces - ie external areas that defenders could not fire on, but did provide multiple locations from which vulnerable points could be defended. The best castles provided rings of defence so that defenders could hold out from a citadel even if the outer defences failed. Castles also needed facilities for a garison and living quarters.

A Multimedia History of World War One

Related: