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The Advanced Google Searches Every Student Should Know - November Learning

The Advanced Google Searches Every Student Should Know - November Learning
“Did he seriously just ask that? How old is this guy?” Well yes, I recently seriously just asked a group of students if they knew how to search Google. And yes, the students got a good laugh from my question. “Of course I know how to use Google,” I have been told by every student to whom I have asked the question. “Really? The truth is that every student can use Google on some level. If you watch your students use Google you will probably observe that most begin their search by simply typing the title of the assignment verbatim into Google (i.e., Iranian Hostage Crisis). After their results pop up, most students will look only at the first screen of results, believing that those top hits contain everything they will need to complete their assignment. But what happens when a meaningful search requires more thinking than simply typing in the assignment? Expert Google search strategies In today’s global economy, global empathy is one of the most critical skills we must teach our students. Related:  Week 6: Google: A Deeper Dive (*=Key reading)Research

How Does Google Work? Learn How Google Works: Search Engine + AdWords The following infographic was created years ago when Google had a content-first focus on search. In the years since then, the rise of mobile devices has caused Google to shift to a user-first approach to search. We created a newer infographic to reflect the modern search landscape here. Vote on Hacker News, or Bookmark this on Delicious 600 Pixel Wide Version <p><a href=" src=" border="0" alt="How Google Works." Large Version <p><a href=" src=" border="0" alt="How Does Google Work?"

Lesson Plans – Search Education – Google Picking the right search terms Beginner Pick the best words to use in academic searching, whether students are beginning with a full question or a topic of just a few words. View lesson Advanced Explore "firm" and "soft" search terms, and practice using context terms to locate subject-specific collections of information on the web. Understanding search results Learn about the different parts of the results page, and about how to evaluate individual results based on cues like web addresses and snippets. Engage additional search strategies, such as generalization and specialization. Narrowing a search to get the best results Apply filtering tools and basic "operators" to narrow search results. Compare results for basic searches with ones that use operators to discover the impact the right operator has at the right time. Searching for evidence for research tasks Evaluating credibility of sources Consider, tone, style, audience, and purpose to determine the credibility of a source. Culture Culture

Flipping the classroom when home access is a problem A lack of reliable internet access at home can make flipping a challenge, but by no means an impossibility Ed. note: Jess Peterson will co-present a related session, “Flipping the Classroom in Low-Socioeconomic Schools,” at this year’s FETC conference in Orlando, on Friday Jan. 15. Ask any educator, and they’ve probably at least heard of flipping the classroom. There are articles for days about the benefits and rewards to be reaped from flipping. Plenty of teachers have given it a go, or at least considered it. Too many teachers have ruled it out on account of their students’ lack of access. It’s true that our students come from all walks of life. Believe it or not, flipping the classroom can actually help close this gap. The Barriers of Flipping the Classroom Life is full of barriers. Students don’t have consistent access to devicesStudents don’t have consistent access to InternetStudents don’t have skills to use the technology Understand the benefits Find out what access students have

Refine web searches - Google Search Help You can use symbols or words in your search to make your search results more precise. Google Search usually ignores punctuation that isn’t part of a search operator. Don’t put spaces between the symbol or word and your search term. Refine image searches Overall Advanced Search Go to Advanced Image Search. Search for an exact image size Right after the word you're looking for, add the text imagesize:widthxheight. Example: imagesize:500x400 Common search techniques Search social media Put @ in front of a word to search social media. Search for a price Put $ in front of a number. Search hashtags Put # in front of a word. Exclude words from your search Put - in front of a word you want to leave out. Search for an exact match Put a word or phrase inside quotes. Search within a range of numbers Put .. between two numbers. Combine searches Put "OR" between each search query. Search for a specific site Put "site:" in front of a site or domain. Search for related sites See Google’s cached version of a site

11 Ways to Teach Savvy Search Skills 3. Use the “three-source rule.” When students are doing online research in her class, Je Hen enforces the three-source rule. Students must confirm information they find on three different websites to make sure it’s valid. Try doing that with the tree octopus! 4. 5. Musings about librarianship: 6 common misconceptions when doing advanced Google Searching As librarians we are often called upon to teach not just library databases but also Google and Google Scholar. Unlike teaching other search tools, teaching Google is often tricky because unlike library databases where we can have insider access through our friendly product support representative as librarians we have no more or no less insight into Google which is legendary for being secretive. Still, given that Google has become synonymous with search we should be decently good at teaching it. I've noticed though, often when people teach Google, particularly advanced searching of Google, they fall prey to 2 main types of errors. The first type of error involved not keeping up to date and given the rapid speed that Google changes, we often end up teaching things that no longer work. The second type of error is perhaps more common to us librarians. Also the typical Google Scholar brings back estimated count of results. eg. The 6 are 1. About tilde (~) About plus operator (+) 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Searching the Web by Moira Allen Remember how long it used to take to find an obscure bit of information? First you drove to the library. Then you spent an hour combing the card catalog for likely books on the topic. Then you searched for the books themselves-- which were usually checked out or missing. If you did find them, you then spent more hours searching the table of contents and indices for that elusive nugget of data. Now you can achieve the same results in less than a minute, with the touch of a button. Defining Effective Search Terms The key is defining an effective search term (or set of terms). To accomplish this, your terms should be as specific as possible. Another approach is to determine what terminology an expert in the subject area would use. If you want to search on a specific term or phrase (more than one word in a specific order), put that phrase in quotation marks. One "Boolean operator," as those old "ands" are referred to, can still be used in your search, however: "Not."

Privacy issues related to online social networking sites To begin exploring issues around using online social spaces for learning and teaching, we sometimes move outside the virtual learning environment (VLE), perhaps to Google Drive, Twitter or Facebook, and in open online courses (such as MOOCs) everything in the VLE might already be public and open to any passing web user. So it is important to remember that the nature of online social spaces, the size of their memberships and their terms of use have implications for privacy and disclosure. The conclusions to the research byGross and Acquisti (2005), indicate how users of social networking spaces, such as Facebook, provide often highly personal and sensitive information with little concern for privacy risks (page 79). Many social software applications require registration with a real name and a verifiable email address (though it is quick and easy to set up a free gmail account for these purposes). Gross, R. and Acquisti, A. (2005).

Google advanced search: A comprehensive list of Google search operators - Beyond Common Google Search Operators by Roger Warner “Search Term” This operator searches for the exact phrase within speech marks only. This is ideal when the phrase you are using to search is ambiguous and could be easily confused with something else, or when you’re not quite getting relevant enough results back. For example: “Tinned Sandwiches” This will search for only the finer tinned variety of the bread based snack, at the exclusion of all others. OR This self explanatory operator searches for a given search term OR an equivalent term. “Martin Sheen” OR “Charlie Sheen” Then immediately seek psychiatric help. – (and +) The – operator removes pages that mention a given term from search results. Manchester -united This would return results for “Manchester”, while removing any that feature the word “united”. Peanut Butter +and Jam ~ Adding a tilde to a search word tells Google that you want it to bring back synonyms for the term as well. link: Use this operator to find links to a domain. ..

A Teacher’s Guide to Wikipedia Wikipedia is often vilified in educational circles. The site’s loudest critics think that it offers biased, non-credible information. Many teachers specifically ban students from using the site from as a reference in research papers. As educators, we know that controversial topics are rarely simply a case of “good” versus “bad.” The name of the site, “Wikipedia,” is a portmanteau of the Hawaiian word “wikiwiki” meaning quick and the English word “encyclopedia.” Through the collaborative process of writing and editing on Wikipedia, users add, delete, and refine information in encyclopedia-like entries. Wikipedia has long been criticized for the lack of reliability, especially because entries get “vandalized,” Wikipedia’s term for the addition of purposely-false information, with graphic and potentially offensive content. It’s good for teachers to note that Wikipedia does not censor language and images. Here are a few good things that teachers should know about the site:

Lesson Plans – Search Education – Google Picking the right search terms Beginner Pick the best words to use in academic searching, whether students are beginning with a full question or a topic of just a few words. View lesson Advanced Explore "firm" and "soft" search terms, and practice using context terms to locate subject-specific collections of information on the web. Understanding search results Learn about the different parts of the results page, and about how to evaluate individual results based on cues like web addresses and snippets. Engage additional search strategies, such as generalization and specialization. Narrowing a search to get the best results Apply filtering tools and basic "operators" to narrow search results. Compare results for basic searches with ones that use operators to discover the impact the right operator has at the right time. Searching for evidence for research tasks Evaluating credibility of sources Consider, tone, style, audience, and purpose to determine the credibility of a source. Culture Culture

Google Search Operators The following table lists the search operators that work with each Google search service. Click on an operator to jump to its description — or, to read about all of the operators, simply scroll down and read all of this page. The following is an alphabetical list of the search operators. This list includes operators that are not officially supported by Google and not listed in Google’s online help. Each entry typically includes the syntax, the capabilities, and an example. Some of the search operators won’t work as intended if you put a space between the colon (:) and the subsequent query word. allinanchor: If you start your query with allinanchor:, Google restricts results to pages containing all query terms you specify in the anchor text on links to the page. Anchor text is the text on a page that is linked to another web page or a different place on the current page. allintext: allintitle: allinurl: In URLs, words are often run together. author: cache: define: ext: filetype: group: id: inanchor:

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