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Atlas of the World's Languages in danger

http://www.unesco.org/languages-atlas/

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World Atlas World Map Atlas of the World including Geography Facts and Flags - worldatlas.com Find Any Address on a map Find Any City on a map Find any Latitude and Longitude and much more Oceans all the details Flags All countries, provinces, states, and territories World Map, Online Maps, Satellite Maps - National Geographic Skip to this page's content National Geographic Society P.O. Map Reading Activities Advertisement. EnchantedLearning.com is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.Click here to learn more. (Already a member? Click here.)

Extinct language An extinct language is a language that no longer has any speakers,[1] or that is no longer in current use. Extinct languages are sometimes contrasted with dead languages, which are still known and used in special contexts in written form, but not as ordinary spoken languages for everyday communication. However, language extinction and language death are often equated.

Map Skills - Worksheets STW Filing Cabinet Logged in members can use the Super Teacher Worksheets filing cabinet to save their favorite worksheets. Quickly access your most commonly used files AND your custom generated worksheets! Please login to your account or become a member today to utilize this helpful new feature. :) [x] close Lists of endangered languages In order to be listed, a language must be classified as "endangered" in an academic source quoted. SIL Ethnologue (2005) lists 473 out of 6,909 living languages inventorized (6.8%) as "nearly extinct", indicating cases where "only a few elderly speakers are still living"; this figure dropped to 6.1% as of 2013.[1] In order to judge if a language is endangered, the number of speakers is less important than the age distribution; There are languages in Indonesia reported with as many as two million native speakers alive now, but all of advancing age, with little or no transmission to the young. On the other hand, while there are 30,000 Ladin speakers left, almost all children still learn it as their mother tongue, thus Ladin is not endangered in the 21st century. UNESCO distinguishes four levels of endangerment in languages, based on intergenerational transfer:[2]

How to use a Compass - Compass alone Kjetil Kjernsmo's illustrated guide on Using the compass alone This is a very easy lesson, and I would say, not sufficient for those who would like to travel safely in unfamiliar terrain. The first thing you need to learn, are the directions. North, South, East and West.

List of map projections This list/table provides an overview of the most significant map projections, including those listed on Wikipedia. It is sortable by the main fields. Inclusion in the table is subjective, as there is no definitive list of map projections. Table of projections[edit] Key[edit] The designation "deployed" means popularisers/users rather than necessarily creators.

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