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The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration

The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration
Bring TeachThought Professional Development To Your School! The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration by TeachThought Staff Using technology for learning makes sense. Technology creates access, transparency, and opportunity. Any smartphone or tablet is media incarnate–video, animation, eBooks, essays, blog posts, messages, music, games. But there is a difference, claims this graphic from teachbytes, between using technology and integrating it deeply into the learning experiences of students. This is not a new idea, but what makes this graphic useful is the indicators offered that clarify Dos and Don’ts–kind of like an educator’s Goofus and Gallant. Goofus gives iPad to students so that they can Google topics for a “research paper.” Gallant helps students design their own open-ended and collaborative learning experiences, and uses apps like Behance or Storehouse to share them with the world. Technology usage is random, arbitrary, and often an afterthought.

http://www.teachthought.com/the-future-of-learning/technology/difference-technology-use-technology-integration/

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The Physics Of Productivity: Newton’s Laws Of Getting Stuff Done In 1687, Sir Isaac Newton published his groundbreaking book, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, which described his three laws of motion. In the process, Newton laid the foundation for classical mechanics and redefined the way the world looked at physics and science. What most people don’t know, however, is that Newton’s three laws of motion can be used as an interesting analogy for increasing your productivity, simplifying your work, and improving your life. Allow me to present this analogy as Newton’s Laws of Productivity.

Fake News Antidote: Teaching Kids To Discern Fact From Fiction : NPR Ed By now, you've probably heard about one very real consequence of fake news — the infamous "pizzagate" conspiracy theory that ended with Edgar Welch, 28, firing a real gun inside a real Washington, D.C., pizzeria filled with real people. When The New York Times later asked Welch what he thought when he realized there were no child slaves inside the restaurant, as one fake news story had led him to believe, he responded: "The intel on this wasn't 100 percent." Welch isn't the only one struggling to tell fact from fiction in this digital age. A recent Stanford study found that America's middle, high school and college students are shockingly bad at it, too. It's clear that something has to change in the nation's classrooms. That something, according to Professor Sam Wineburg, one of those Stanford researchers, is "practice."

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done - 5 Expert Tips Some days the to-do list seems bottomless. Just looking at it is exhausting. We all want to know how to stop being lazy and get more done. I certainly want the answer. 10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog For many of us, 2016 is going down as a year to forget. Election upsets, Zika, the Syrian crisis, and unfortunately tons of fake news about all of the above and everything in between. Denzel Washington was recently quoted as saying, “If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you’re misinformed.” So what should you do? The Duckworth Lab NEW! Measurement matters: Assessing personal qualities other than cognitive ability for educational purposes. If grit and self-control are so important, should schools and policymakers measure them? The answer to this simple question is a little complicated. See this article, co-authored with David Yeager for our perspective (pdf). (Please see these links as well for the press release and video created by the American Educational Research Association).

Library Lovers' Day Get involved | Resources | Wrap up Take a look at some ideas on how to celebrate Library Lovers' Day and be inspired! #librarylove Ideas for your communication channels The Best of Free Technology for Teachers in January Good evening from Maine where the sun is setting on the first month of 2017. It has been a busy month here at the Byrne Instructional Media, LLC World Headquarters. Besides the usual blogging activities that you see here, I hosted a series of Wednesday afternoon webinars, taught a course, spoke at a conference, and made arrangements for this summer's Practical Ed Tech Summer Camps. And, of course, I tried to answer your email requests for ed tech help. You can always email me at richardbyrne (at) freetech4teachers.com

Five Reasons to Stop Saying "Good Job!" (**) - Alfie Kohn September 2001 By Alfie Kohn NOTE: An abridged version of this article was published in Parents magazine in May 2000 with the title “Hooked on Praise.” For a more detailed look at the issues discussed here — as well as a comprehensive list of citations to relevant research — please see the books Punished by Rewards and Unconditional Parenting. Para leer este artículo en Español, haga clic aquí. Hang out at a playground, visit a school, or show up at a child’s birthday party, and there’s one phrase you can count on hearing repeatedly: “Good job!”

Brain-Based Learning Techniques to Try in Your Classroom Brain-based learning isn’t a new concept, but it’s enjoying renewed attention thanks to the teacher accountability movement begun by President George W. Bush and continued by President Barack Obama. In a nutshell, teachers who use brain-based techniques don their “neuroscientist” hats and focus on creating experiences that cater to the inner workings of their students’ brains. The result: better learning experiences and better retention. Hundreds of different variables affect how well your students digest information. Neuroscientific research suggests that some of the most important variables that impact learning include physical activity, social health, and the pace at which information is presented.

12 Principles Of Modern Learning 12 Principles Of Modern Learning by TeachThought Staff What are the principles of modern learning? Well, that depends on how you define ‘learning’ and what you’d consider ‘modern.’ Three Free Collaborative Whiteboard Tools Online whiteboards that let students communicate in realtime either by voice or text can be powerful tools to create a mathematics tutorial, create a diagram, or to brainstorm ideas for a project. The following three whiteboard tools can all be used by students for free. NoteBookCast is a free whiteboard tool that will work in the web browser on a laptop, iPad, Android tablet, and Windows tablet. NoteBookCast is a collaborative whiteboard tool. You can invite others to join your whiteboard by entering the code assigned to your whiteboard. 7 Habits Of Highly-Effective Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology 7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology by TeachThought Staff Ed note: This post has been updated with an updated visual from Sylvia Duckworth, who took our graphic from alwaysprepped.com (now getalma) post and created the above visual. It is also sporting a new title, as the “habits of” is a trademarked term. As such, the new graphic and phrasing appears below. You can also see Sylvia’s tutorial on sketchnotes here.

5 Ways Schools Can Make Learning Relevant for Students By Tanya Roscorla on November 10, 2014 Eric Sheninger talks about how to make learning work for students at TedxBurnsvilleED. Screenshot of the talk by Tanya Roscorla

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