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If the World were 100 PEOPLE

If the World were 100 PEOPLE
50 would be female 50 would be male 26 would be children There would be 74 adults, 8 of whom would be 65 and olderThere would be: 60 Asians 15 Africans 14 people from the Americas 11 Europeans33 Christians 22 Muslims 14 Hindus 7 Buddhists 12 people who practice other religions 12 people who would not be aligned with a religion12 would speak Chinese 5 would speak Spanish 5 would speak English 3 would speak Arabic 3 would speak Hindi 3 would speak Bengali 3 would speak Portuguese 2 would speak Russian 2 would speak Japanese 62 would speak other languages83 would be able to read and write; 17 would not 7 would have a college degree 22 would own or share a computer77 people would have a place to shelter themfrom the wind and the rain, but 23 would not 1 would be dying of starvation 15 would be undernourished 21 would be overweight 87 would have access to safe drinking water 13 people would have no clean, safe water to drink

http://www.100people.org/statistics_100stats.php?section=statistics

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40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School By the time we graduate high school, we learn that they never taught us the most interesting things in there. Sure, you might be able to name the European countries or point New York on the map, but does that give a you real understanding of how the world functions? To fill this gap, we have gathered a great and informative selection of infographical maps that they should’ve shown us at school: every single one of these maps reveals different fun and interesting facts, which can actually help you draw some pretty interesting conclusions. [Read more...] What makes infographical maps so engaging is how easy it becomes to conceive graphically presented information. The best part, there are brilliant services like Target Map that “allow everyone (from individuals to large organizations) to represent their data on maps of any country in the world and to share their knowledge with the whole Internet Community.”

Facebook status updates reveal low self-esteem and narcissism People who post Facebook status updates about their romantic partner are more likely to have low self-esteem, while those who brag about diets, exercise, and accomplishments are typically narcissists, according to new research. Psychologists at Brunel University London surveyed Facebook users to examine the personality traits and motives that influence the topics they choose to write about in their status updates — something that few previous studies have explored. The data was collected from 555 Facebook users who completed online surveys measuring the ‘Big Five’ personality traits — extroversion, neuroticism, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness — as well as self-esteem and narcissism. The research found: People with low self-esteem more frequently posted status updates about their current romantic partner.Narcissists more frequently updated about their achievements, which was motivated by their need for attention and validation from the Facebook community.

Six maps that will make you rethink the world We don’t often question the typical world map that hangs on the walls of classrooms — a patchwork of yellow, pink and green that separates the world into more than 200 nations. But Parag Khanna, a global strategist, says that this map is, essentially, obsolete. Khanna is the author of the new book “Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization,” in which he argues that the arc of global history is undeniably bending toward integration. 8513 25Share1 Click to enlarge Get rich quick schemes rarely go according to plan, so unfortunately you're going to have to do some work if you want to make it big. Still, if you want to get the most bang for your buck, you might want to check out what state is going to pay you the most for the same job. Business Insider found the jobs that make the most money in each state versus the national average.

The Web Is Not a Post-Racial Utopia Rust, a 2013 indie survival game from Facepunch Studios, plays like a cross between Minecraft and Grand Theft Auto. Players find themselves “born” into a mysterious wilderness, naked and alone, forced to forage for resources and to craft clothing, supplies and shelter for themselves. They must contend with starvation, hypothermia and animal attacks, but by far the most dangerous threat comes from other players who roam the island. When the game was first opened up, all players were given the same default avatar: a bald white man. With the most recent update, Rust’s lead developer, Garry Newman, introduced different avatars of different racial origins into the mix. However, they did so with a twist — unlike typical massively multiplayer online role-playing games, Rust does not allow players to choose the race of their avatar.

5 Time-Saving Ways Teachers Can Use Google Forms One of my favorite features of Google Drive is Google Forms. If you’re unfamiliar with this, think of it as a way to create quick surveys that can be used for a number of applications. Google automatically aggregates this data into a Google Spreadsheet, making forms a great way to quickly collect and share information. Origin of crops by Colin K. Khoury, Harold A. Achicanoy, Carlos Navarro-Racines, Steven Sotelo, and Andy Jarvis at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT). Version 1.0 (May 2016). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). This work is associated with the publication:

​I Grew Up in a Polyamorous Household Few cultural symbols have as much heft as the "traditional" nuclear family. You know the one: two heterosexual parents, two kids, one dog, two tablespoons of white picket fence, whisk gently. Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with that—it's just not how I was raised. My parents are polyamorous, a Greek/Latin mishmash word meaning romantic non-monogamy with the consent of everyone involved. Animated interactive of the history of the Atlantic slave trade. Source: slavevoyages.org For the full interactive version, use a larger device. Interactive by Andrew Kahn. Background image by Tim Jones. Usually, when we say “American slavery” or the “American slave trade,” we mean the American colonies or, later, the United States. But as we discussed in Episode 2 of Slate’s History of American Slavery Academy, relative to the entire slave trade, North America was a bit player.

Mongolia Adopts An Innovative System of 3-Word Locations The idea is simple enough. Wouldn’t locations be easier to remember if we traded in complicated GPS coordinates for simple and memorable three-word phrases? That’s the idea behind what3words, a new system that—in the words of Big Think’s Frank Jacobs in his entertaining article on the system—is “doing for geolocation what domain names did for IP addresses.” That is, make them easier to share and to remember. (Read Frank’s article—it’s fun.) what3words has divided up the earth into 57 trillion three-by-three-meter squares and created an algorithm to assign each one a three-word name.

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages. 1. Some continents have more languages than others 7 Maps to Help Make Sense of the Middle East - Metrocosm This amazing tangled knot of a diagram, made by U.K. data journalist David McCandless, displays the key players and notable relationships in the Middle East. However what it communicates clearest of all is something you no doubt already know: The Middle East is a confusing place. While the seven maps below don’t provide an exhaustive list of the facts, figures, rivalries, or conflicts in the Middle East, they do give some insight into the trends and forces that drive them. And hopefully, they are helpful in making sense of the region.

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