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Ivy League Schools Are Overrated. Send Your Kids Elsewhere.

Ivy League Schools Are Overrated. Send Your Kids Elsewhere.
These enviable youngsters appear to be the winners in the race we have made of childhood. But the reality is very different, as I have witnessed in many of my own students and heard from the hundreds of young people whom I have spoken with on campuses or who have written to me over the last few years. Our system of elite education manufactures young people who are smart and talented and driven, yes, but also anxious, timid, and lost, with little intellectual curiosity and a stunted sense of purpose: trapped in a bubble of privilege, heading meekly in the same direction, great at what they’re doing but with no idea why they’re doing it. I should say that this subject is very personal for me. Like so many kids today, I went off to college like a sleepwalker. You chose the most prestigious place that let you in; up ahead were vaguely understood objectives: status, wealth—“success.” A young woman from another school wrote me this about her boyfriend at Yale: U.S.

https://newrepublic.com/article/118747/ivy-league-schools-are-overrated-send-your-kids-elsewhere

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