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The advanced Google searches every student should know

The advanced Google searches every student should know
Google has amazing tools for finding school-worthy sources. Too bad most kids don’t know they exist “Did he seriously just ask that? How old is this guy?” Well yes, I recently seriously just asked a group of students if they knew how to search Google. And yes, the students got a good laugh from my question. “Of course I know how to use Google,” I have been told by every student to whom I have asked the question. “Really? The truth is that every student can use Google on some level. If you watch your students use Google you will probably observe that most begin their search by simply typing the title of the assignment verbatim into Google (i.e., Iranian Hostage Crisis). After their results pop up, most students will look only at the first screen of results, believing that those top hits contain everything they will need to complete their assignment. But what happens when a meaningful search requires more thinking than simply typing in the assignment?

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/11/23/how-search-google-592/

Related:  Google Suite / All Things GoogleGOOGLESearching/Finding SourcesTechnology in the Classroom

Make This the Year You Launch Genius Hour By Gallit Zvi and Denise Krebs Have you heard of Genius Hour? It’s inquiry-based and passion-based learning all rolled into one and students love it! We are firm believers in this kind of student-centered classroom experience. If you haven’t given this learning idea a shot in your class yet, we think you should consider making this the year you launch Genius Hour. 5 cool Google Drive features you probably aren't using—yet Google Drive’s austere interface can trick you into thinking what you see is all you get. But it’s actually packed with powerful productivity features that aren’t immediately apparent. And we’ve gone back to uncover even more. Here are five you probably aren’t using, but should be. Drag-and-drop files Normally when you want to upload a file to Google Drive, you go hit the big red New button, select File upload, and then navigate the folders on your computer to grab the file you need.

Teach your students the right way to Google Kelly Maher November 24th, 2014 In the age of the split-second Google search, it’s more critical than ever to train students to distinguish between primary and secondary sources As in decades past, proper research methods are an essential skill for today’s students. At a time when most students (and adults, for that matter) are accustomed to heading straight to Google to answer all of their questions, being able to sagely sift through the good, the bad, and the ugly of search results is key to creating independent 21st century thinkers. However, even when used properly, Google is not always the right resource. Teachers want larger role in ed-tech decisions “Nobody is better situated than classroom teachers when it comes to observing which education technologies are driving meaningful improvements to student learning outcomes,” says Bob Pianta, Dean of the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, and Chairman of the Jefferson Education Accelerator. “Decisions about which ed-tech products and services should be in our classrooms should be heavily influenced by teachers who have access to evidence of their impact.” Forty-eight percent of respondents believe that cost is the number one influence on ed-tech selection, more so than student outcomes (22 percent) and teacher buy-in (9 percent). Just 12 percent of respondents say school-based technology experts currently make decisions, but 33 percent of respondents say they should play an important role (second only to teachers).

10 tips to use Google Classroom effectively and efficiently Google Classroom can be even more powerful with a few tips and strategies to make it efficient and effective. Google Classroom streamlines the management of student work — announcing, assigning, collecting, grading, giving feedback and returning. It has certainly saved many teachers hours of work. Without a solid workflow and some strategy, grading digital work can be cumbersome.

How to Search in Google: 31 Advanced Google Search Tips If you’re like me, you probably use Google many times a day. But chances are, unless you're a technology geek, you probably still use Google in its simplest form. If your current use of Google is limited to typing in a few words and changing your query until you find what you’re looking for, then I’m here to tell you that there’s a better way -- and it’s not hard to learn. On the other hand, even if you are a technology geek and can use Google like the best of them already, I still suggest you bookmark this article of advanced Google search tips. Then, you’ll then have the tips on hand when you're ready to pull your hair out in frustration watching a neophyte repeatedly type in basic queries in a desperate attempt to find something.

Research Tips: Primary, secondary and tertiary sources Using Primary, secondary and Tertiary Sources in Research Let’s say you are writing a research paper on the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) of 1972, but you are unfamiliar with it. A good place to gather a general idea or understanding of the ERA would be a tertiary source, such as Wikipedia or the Encyclopedia Brittanica. There, you can read a summary of events on its history, key people involved, and legislation. To find more in-depth analysis on the Equal Rights Amendment, you consult a secondary source: the nonfiction book Why We Lost the ERA by Jane Mansbridge and a newspaper article from the 1970s that discuss and review the legislation.

The advanced Google searches every student should know The internet presents our students with the significant challenge of learning how to access and synthesize massive amounts of information from all over the world. To manage overwhelming amounts of information, it is critical to learn how to design searches that take you past the first page of results. The quality of information can lead to a over simplification of an issue or lead to a much deeper understanding of the nuances of a topic. In today’s global economy, global empathy is one of the most critical skills we must teach our students. To this end, utilizing the internet strategically can lead students to understand other cultures and viewpoints and spark authentic learning experiences. Just Google it - sandmountainreporter.com: Home The Albertville City School System is one of the “Googliest” in the state. Technology Coordinator Terry Freeman and a team from the Albertville City School System recently returned from a Google technology coordinators conference in Perdido Beach. Freeman said Albertville has integrated Google Classroom system-wide and the team was asked to speak at the conference about their experience with Google technology. “This is our third year to use Google Classroom,” Freeman said. “We started using it as soon as they rolled it out.

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