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The Story of Human Rights

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Celebrate Black History Month 2016 Skip to main content <div id="nojs-warning">WARNING: Javascript must be enabled for the correct page display</div> Sign InRegister ReadWorks.org The Solution to Reading Comprehension Search form ReadWorks Celebrate Black History Month 2016 Share now! Print Videos These videos are used with the generous permission of HISTORY® Kindergarten "Who Was Jackie Robinson?" 1st Grade "Martin Luther King, Jr." "Covers" Poetry by Nikki Giovanni 2nd Grade "A Hero in Disguise" with Paired Video: "Mini Bio: Harriet Tubman" Passage Lexile: 710 Video used with the generous permission of HISTORY® "American Heroes" with Paired Video: "Mini Bio: Jackie Robinson" Passage Lexile: 650 Video used with the generous permission of HISTORY® "Great Americans" Lexile: 560 3rd Grade "Maya Angelou" Passage Lexile: 590 "Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad" with Paired Video "Mini Bio: Harriet Tubman" Passage Lexile: 660 Video used with the generous permission of HISTORY® 4th Grade "Walking Tall" Lexile: 770 5th Grade 6th Grade

Standing With Malala: Meet the Teenagers Who Survived the Taliban and Kept Going to School by Jing Fong and Araz Hachadourian On a Tuesday in October 2012, a bus carrying the students of Khushal Girls High School and College in Pakistan’s Swat Valley came to a stop. The girls inside were on their way home from a day of exams. “I was looking outside daydreaming,” recalls Shazia Ramzan, who was 14 years old at the time. “I was talking with my best friend, Sana,” says Ramzan's friend, Kainat Riaz, who was 16. Moments later, Taliban gunmen boarded the bus looking for the girls’ classmate Malala Yousafzai, a 15-year-old advocate for girls’ education who wrote about the Taliban and education on her blog. In 2007, the Taliban arrived in the Swat Valley—known by locals as the “Switzerland of Pakistan” for its natural beauty—and began ordering the closure of schools, particularly for girls. The October 2012 shooting was just one act of terror used to enforce the ban. After the shooting, Malala was moved to Britain for months of medical treatment. At first, Ramzan and Riaz remained in Swat. YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES!

What are human rights? Human rights are like armour: they protect you; they are like rules, because they tell you how you can behave; and they are like judges, because you can appeal to them. They are abstract – like emotions; and like emotions, they belong to everyone and they exist no matter what happens. They are like nature because they can be violated; and like the spirit because they cannot be destroyed. Like time, they treat us all in the same way – rich and poor, old and young, white and black, tall and short. They offer us respect, and they charge us to treat others with respect. Like goodness, truth and justice, we may sometimes disagree about their definition, but we recognise them when we see them. Question: How do you define human rights? A right is a claim that we are justified in making. An acceptance of human rights means accepting that everyone is entitled to make these claims: I have these rights, no matter what you say or do, because I am a human being, just like you. Key values Notes

I, Too, Sing America Patriotism's a pretty complicated concept. It can mean standing up for your country or criticizing it. If you want to sum up patriotism, you can simply call it "love for one's country." Langston Hughes certainly doesn't think so. Hughes was often considered the poet laureate of the Harlem Renaissance. Hughes published "I, Too, Sing America" in 1945, a good ten years or so before the start of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States. We started this party talking about patriotism. Patriotism's all about loving your country and being proud to be its citizen, right? In Langston Hughes's case, he knows that by birth he's an American citizen. So Hughes pens this poem, in which he envisions a greater America, a more inclusive America. Freedom and equality.

English Conversation – Human Rights This is the preparation material for an English conversation lesson about human rights. Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. Universal human rights are often guaranteed by the law of a country, general principles and other sources of international law. International human rights laws give down obligations of Governments to act in certain ways or to refrain from certain acts, in order to promote and protect human rights and freedoms of individuals or groups. Video about Human Rights How did you feel when you watched the video on human rights? Vocabulary Phrasal Verbs & Expressions Conversation Questions What human rights do you know about?

New Report of U.S.-Made Cluster Bomb Use by Saudis in Yemen Photo released a report Sunday providing new indications that has fired American-made cluster munitions, banned by international treaty, in civilian areas of , and said their use may also violate United States law. The report included photographs from Yemen purporting to show unexploded but potentially lethal remnants of American cluster weapons, suggesting that they had failed legally required reliability standards. If confirmed, the report could put new pressure on the United States over support for its ally Saudi Arabia in the Yemen conflict. The Americans have sold arms and furnished training and expertise to a Saudi-led coalition that has faced widespread criticism for what rights groups call an indiscriminate bombing campaign against Yemen’s Houthi rebels in nearly a year of fighting. John Kirby, the State Department spokesman, said in a statement Sunday night: “We have seen the Human Rights Watch report, and are reviewing it.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Articles & Videos Skip to main content <div id="nojs-warning">WARNING: Javascript must be enabled for the correct page display</div> Sign InRegister ReadWorks.org The Solution to Reading Comprehension Search form ReadWorks Dr. Share now! Print This video is used with the generous permission of HISTORY® Articles & Question Sets Note: For read-aloud, it is appropriate to use passages at higher levels than your students' independent reading levels. Kindergarten - 1st Grade "Martin Luther King Jr." 2nd - 4th Grade "An American Leader" Lexile: 810 "A Great Leader" Lexile: 900 5th - 8th Grade "Excerpt from Martin Luther King Jr.' "The King Holiday" Lexile: 1300Primary Source 9th - 12th Grade "Oct. 14, 1964: King Wins Nobel Peace Prize" Lexile: 1320 This article is used with the generous permission of HISTORY® "Martin Luther King Jr. "10 Things You May Not Know About Martin Luther King Jr." "Selma to Montgomery March"Lexile: 1530This article is used with the generous permission of HISTORY® About ReadWorks

Book Excerpt: My Forbidden Face, by Latifa — When the Taliban took over the Afghan capital, Kabul, in 1997, Latifa was a 16-year-old teenager, listening to Elvis and dreaming of going to college. The Taliban's harsh rule transformed her life for the next four years. Following is an excerpt from her book, My Forbidden Face: Growing Up Under the Taliban — A Young Woman's Story, which she wrote in exile after fleeing the Taliban regime in 2001. Chapter One The White Flag Over the Mosque 9 A.M., September 27, 1996. Someone knocks violently on our door. Until this morning. Papa returns to the kitchen, followed by Farad, our young cousin, who is pale and breathless. "I came...to find out how you were. "No, no one's been here, but we saw the white flag waving over the mosque-Daoud spotted it a few hours ago. This morning, around five o'clock, my young brother Daoud went downstairs as usual to fetch some water from the tap in the courtyard of our building, but came hurrying back up with the basin still empty. "Can you imagine?

Nigerian suicide bomber gets cold feet, refuses to kill © Jossy Ola/AP Photo In this Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016 file photo, rescue workers transport a victim of a suicide bomb attack at a refugee for treatment at a hospital, in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Strapped with a booby-trapped vest and sent by Boko Haram to kill as many people as possible, the young teenage girl tore off the explosives and fled as soon as she was out of sight of her handlers. Her two companions, however, completed their grisly mission and walked into a crowd of hundreds at Dikwa refugee camp in northeast Nigeria and blew themselves up, killing 58 people. ABUJA, Nigeria — Strapped with a booby-trapped vest and sent by Boko Haram to kill as many people as possible, the young teenage girl tore off the explosives and fled as soon as she was out of sight of her handlers. Her two companions, however, completed their grisly mission and walked into a crowd of hundreds at Dikwa refugee camp in northeast Nigeria and blew themselves up, killing 58 people.

Celebrating MLK Day Updated: Jan., 2014 In recognition of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, here is a collection of New York Times, Learning Network and other materials for teaching and learning about Dr. King, the civil rights movement he led and his legacy. Selected Times Resources Historical Front Pages and Articles “Martin Luther King Wins The Nobel Prize for Peace” Oct. 15, 1962Front Page | Article (PDF)“200,000 March for Civil Rights in Orderly Washington Rally” Aug. 29, 1963Front Page | Article (PDF) “The Big Parade: On the Way to Montgomery” March 21, 1965Front Page“25,000 Go to Alabama’s Capitol” March 25, 1965Front Page“Martin Luther King is Slain in Memphis” April 4, 1968Front Page | Article (PDF) Multimedia Video Articles and Opinion Pieces Slide Show Important Moments in Black History Times Topics Learning Network Lesson Plans and Resources Text to Text | ‘I Have a Dream’ and ‘The Lasting Power of Dr. Student Crossword Puzzles Other Resources Nobelprize.org The official Nobel Prize biography of Dr.

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