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Ten Simple Rules for the Care and Feeding of Scientific Data Citation: Goodman A, Pepe A, Blocker AW, Borgman CL, Cranmer K, Crosas M, et al. (2014) Ten Simple Rules for the Care and Feeding of Scientific Data. PLoS Comput Biol 10(4): e1003542. Editor: Philip E. CIRSS Digital Humanities Data Curation What is this? The DH Curation Guide is a compilation of articles that address aspects of data curation in the digital humanities. The goal of the DH Curation Guide is to direct readers to trusted resources with enough context from expert editors and the other members of the research community to indicate to how these resources might help them with their own data curation challenges. Each article provides a short introduction to a topic and a list of linked resources. Structuring articles in this way acknowledges the many excellent resources that already exist to provide guidance on subjects relevant to curation such as data formats, legal policies, description, and more.

Our Lessons Availability All of our lessons are freely available under the Creative Commons - Attribution License. You may re-use and re-mix the material in any way you wish, without asking permission, provided you cite us as the original source (e.g., provide a link back to this website). Contributing If you have questions about contributing to particular lessons, please contact their maintainers (listed below). Rundata - Wikipedia History[edit] The origin of the Rundata project was a 1986 database of Swedish inscriptions at Uppsala University for use in the Scandinavian Languages Department.[2] At a seminar in 1990 it was proposed to expand the database to cover all Nordic runic inscriptions, but funding for the project was not available until a grant was received in 1992 from the Axel och Margaret Ax:son Johnsons foundation.[2] The project officially started on January 1, 1993 at Uppsala University. After 1997, the project was no longer funded and work continued on a voluntary basis outside of normal work-hours.[2] In the current edition, published on December 3, 2008, there are over 6500 inscriptions in the database.[2] Work is currently underway for the next edition of the database.

The Fermi Paradox PDF: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. Buy it here. (Or see a preview.) ANDS Discovery Services / Australian Research Data Commons Who needs to know this? This is a general introduction that is likely to be of interest to all users of ANDS, including researchers, their support staff, data centre and repository staff and the general public. ANDS' Vision ANDS has as its vision ‘more researchers reusing more data more often'. There are many reasons why the sharing and re-use of data can contribute to the effectiveness of research in all disciplines: Data Science Seminars - BD2K Training Coordinating Center The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science Series Every Friday beginning September 9, 2016 12pm - 1pm Eastern Time / 9am - 10am Pacific Time

About the History Data Service Collection About the History Data Service Collection The History Data Service data collection brings together over 650 separate studies transcribed, scanned or compiled from historical sources. The studies cover a wide range of historical topics, from the seventh century to the twentieth century. Although the primary focus of the collection is on the United Kingdom, it also includes a significant body of cross-national and international data collections. Examples of topics covered include: nineteenth and twentieth century statistics, manuscript census records, state finance data, demographic data, mortality data, community histories, electoral history and economic indicators.

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle When the 2011 earthquake and tsunami struck Tohoku, Japan, Chris Goldfinger was two hundred miles away, in the city of Kashiwa, at an international meeting on seismology. As the shaking started, everyone in the room began to laugh. Earthquakes are common in Japan—that one was the third of the week—and the participants were, after all, at a seismology conference. Then everyone in the room checked the time. Seismologists know that how long an earthquake lasts is a decent proxy for its magnitude. McMaster Library Some open access journals charge authors a publishing fee. Many non-open access journals also make page or author charges in addition to subscription charges to readers. The Tri-Agency Open Access Policy identifies the cost of publishing as an eligible expense under the Use of Grant Funds Use SHERPA/JULIET to find more info about research funders’ open access policies McMaster University does not offer grants for Article/Author Processing Charges (APCs).

Research Data MANTRA - Library Training Introduction During autumn and winter 2012-13, data librarians at the University of Edinburgh (Robin Rice and Anne Donnelly) led a pilot course for four University academic service librarians on Research Data Management (RDM) covering five topics involving reading assigments from the MANTRA course, reflective writing, and 2-hour face-to-face training sessions, including group exercises from the UK Data Archive (UKDA). The course was deemed successful by participants and Information Services managers, and was delivered to all the University's academic service librarians. Here we share our training for small groups of librarians anywhere who wish to gain confidence and understanding of research data management. The DIY Training Kit is designed to contain everything needed to complete a similar training course on your own (in small groups) and is based on open educational materials.

DBpedia datasets The DBpedia data set uses a large multi-domain ontology which has been derived from Wikipedia as well as localized versions of DBpedia in more than 100 languages. 1 Background Wikipedia has grown into one of the central knowledge sources of mankind and is maintained by thousands of contributors. Wikipedia articles consist mostly of free text, but also contain different types of structured information, such as infobox templates, categorisation information, images, geo-coordinates, and links to external Web pages. For instance, the figure below shows the source code and the visualisation of an infobox template containing structured information about the town of Innsbruck. Public-Friendly Open Science Previous “A “Modern Scientist” Manifesto” In the 21st century science is growing more technical and complex, as we gaze further and further while standing on the shoulders of many generations of giants. The public has often a hard time understanding research and its relevance to society. One of the reasons for this is that scientists do not spend enough time communicating their findings outside their own scientific community.

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