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Greenpeace UK

Greenpeace UK
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Why are we a nation of tree-huggers? 3 February 2011Last updated at 15:44 By Jon Kelly BBC News Magazine Plans to transfer ownership of many public forests in England have provoked a huge row. But why are we so protective of our woodlands? It's about the rustling of the leaves and the crunch of twigs underfoot. Above all, it's a place where nature takes priority over humans. For the vast majority of us, living in towns and cities, visiting a forest is the easiest way to escape our mechanised, wipe-clean, ring-roaded civilisation and properly get back to nature. As the government is finding out, a forest unleashes something deeply primordial in otherwise domesticated, suburban Britons. Plans to radically change the ownership of some of England's forests have provoked a furious backlash. A YouGov poll suggested that 84% of people were opposed. to the government's plans, with one pressure group saying it had collected 400,000 signatures on a petition. Continue reading the main story Why trees are a force for good

SXSW 2011: The internet is over If my grandchildren ever ask me where I was when I realised the internet was over – they won't, of course, because they'll be too busy playing with the teleportation console – I'll be able to be quite specific: I was in a Mexican restaurant opposite a cemetery in Austin, Texas, halfway through eating a taco. It was the end of day two of South by Southwest Interactive, the world's highest-profile gathering of geeks and the venture capitalists who love them, and I'd been pursuing a policy of asking those I met, perhaps a little too aggressively, what it was exactly that they did. What is "user experience", really? The content strategist across the table took a sip of his orange-coloured cocktail. This, for outsiders, is the fundamental obstacle to understanding where technology culture is heading: increasingly, it's about everything. Web 3.0 Alarming ones, too, of course, if you don't know exactly what's being shared with whom. The game layer The dictator's dilemma Biomimicry comes of age

AECB Home Page - Rainforest - mongabay.com Discover the doomsday seed vault's secrets (NaturalNews) Are you aware of the Arctic Circle Doomsday Seed Vault? Technically it's the Svalbard International Seed Vault. The media has hailed it as an attempt to create a doomsday ark containing a wide variety of seeds to ensure the future of agriculture in the event of widespread crop disasters. A closer look behind the curtains finds some suspicious characters heavily vested in the vault's activity.The doomsday seed vault is situated on the island of Spitzbergen, Norway, located in the Svalbard island group within the Arctic Circle. It exists in an old copper mine, which is connected by a long steel tunnel from outside of the mine's mountain. It is steel and concrete fortified with all the latest technological innovations for supplying power and maintaining seed security. It is considered a safety deposit box back up for all other seed banks located throughout the world, of which there are many. Engdahl suspects something is rotten in Svalbard. Sources for this article include:

Bioneers - Revolution From the Heart of Nature Wildlife Webcams - Live from the Rainforest Enjoying this page? If everyone watching World Land Trust's webcams made a donation of £1, it would cover the cost of keeping the cameras running and enable us to add more to the network! For example, text WEBC13 £3 ($5) to 70070 to donate £3 ($5) to World Land Trust's webcam fund. Donate with Live webcams by the World Land Trust (WLT) stream rainforest life from across South America Discover tropical birds and charismatic animals that you have never seen before - from greedy families of coatis to vibrant fluttering hummingbirds. Share your passion for the natural world with people from across the globe with the Webcam Chat and get your wildlife questions answered by an expert. Our three webcams show live footage from the breath-taking and remote tropical forests of Ecuador, Brazil and Argentina, where WLT is supporting conservation projects to protect some of the most threatened habitats and wildlife on Earth. Find out more about WLT's conservation projects » Sir David Attenborough, WLT Patron

Vidéo Mouvement perpetuel de fidjie (Musique - fidjie Chief Seattle's Speech of 1854 - Version 1 Version 1 (below) appeared in the Seattle Sunday Star on Oct. 29, 1887, in a column by Dr. Henry A. Smith. "CHIEF SEATTLE'S 1854 ORATION" - ver . 1 Yonder sky that has wept tears of compassion upon my people for centuries untold, and which to us appears changeless and eternal, may change. There was a time when our people covered the land as the waves of a wind-ruffled sea cover its shell-paved floor, but that time long since passed away with the greatness of tribes that are now but a mournful memory. Youth is impulsive. Our good father in Washington--for I presume he is now our father as well as yours, since King George has moved his boundaries further north--our great and good father, I say, sends us word that if we do as he desires he will protect us. To us the ashes of our ancestors are sacred and their resting place is hallowed ground. Your dead cease to love you and the land of their nativity as soon as they pass the portals of the tomb and wander away beyond the stars.

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